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I'm trying to figure out the best way to handle indexing object literals with TypeScript.

Ideally here is the information I'd like to pass on to the type checker... If a known key is given, expect for the value to be one that is known otherwise expect undefined.

Here is a concrete example:

const MAPPING = { "A": 1, "B": 2 }

function lookup1(key: string) {
   return MAPPING[key] || 0
}

Here we reasonably get the following error:

Element implicitly has an 'any' type because expression of type 'string' can't be used to index type '{ A: number; B: number; }'.

I thought the following function might work, but TypeScript doesn't seem to be able to infer the types properly:

function lookup2(key: string) {
    if (key in MAPPING) return MAPPING[key]
    return 0
}

First hacky solution

function lookup3(key: string): number {
    return MAPPING[key as keyof typeof MAPPING] || 0
}

Problems: It's verbose and it lies to the type checker. If you forget || 0, everything looks fine.

Second hacky solution

I could change the type on the mapping:

const MAPPING: { [i: string]: number | undefined } = { "A": 1, "B": 2 }

However, now I can't use keyof typeof MAPPING if I need to guarantee the keys are correct.

3 Answers 3

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TypeScript's type system isn't perfectly sound and has (largely intentional) holes where you can sneak through unsafe things. Conversely there are places where soudness is enforced, but in a way that is often unhelpful to developers who then need to use type assertions or other loopholes to work around them. Idiomatic TypeScript can often be unsafe; safety is often regained only at the expense of jumping through seemingly unnecessary hoops; and the safety is sometimes illusory.

My point: your "hacky" solutions are essentially fine as long as you're aware of their limitations. You can sometimes rewrite these assertions so that they are not lies, but you are not really prevented from lying. As long as you can limit the scope of any potential lies so that they don't easily spread to other code, you're probably doing something reasonable.


Let's look at some other possible solutions. The following is probably as safe as I can imagine:

function lookup1(key: string) {
    return (key === "A" || key === "B") ? MAPPING[key] : 0; // no lies, but redundant
}

Here you are explicitly comparing key to the literal strings "A" and "B". It does involves duplication at runtime, which might be worse than using a type assertion, but there's no obvious way I can think of to fool the compiler here. So you get safety in exchange for some not-very-scalable hoop jumping.


So why can't you just check key in MAPPING? It's because object types in TypeScript are open and not exact. TypeScript knows that MAPPING contains A and B keys. It does not know that it lacks all other keys. As far as the compiler is concerned, it is possible that MAPPING has keys C and D keys of, say, string type:

type MappingType = { A: number, B: number };
const weirdMapping = {A: 1, B: 2, C: "three", D: "four"};
const MAPPING: MappingType = weirdMapping;

So just checking key in MAPPING does not imply that you've checked if MAPPING[key] is of type number. And for similar reasons, Object.keys(MAPPING) is considered to be type string[] and not Array<"A" | "B">. This is one of those places where the compiler enforces soundness in a way that feels unhelpful a lot of the time.

If you want to tell the compiler not to worry about this problem (and take the responsibility for preventing these edge cases yourself), you can use a type assertion like this:

function lookup2(key: string) {
    return (key in MAPPING) ? MAPPING[key as keyof typeof MAPPING] : 0;
}

or you could make a user-defined type guard which allows you to assert to the compiler that a boolean-returning function acts as a check on one of its arguments:

function lookup3(key: string) {
    // user defined type guards are not safe either, much like type assertions
    function isKeyOf<T>(obj: T, k: PropertyKey): k is keyof T {
        return k in obj; 
    }
    return isKeyOf(MAPPING, key) ? MAPPING[key] : 0;
}

Both the type assertion and the user defined type guard allow you to lie to the compiler. As long as we're sure that MAPPING only contains A and B keys, then we haven't actually lied. Whether or not this is more or less hacky than your code in the question is subjective.


The other thing you could do is along the lines of your second solution, but instead of widening MAPPING itself, create a new wider variable and assign MAPPING to it:

function lookup4(key: string) {
    const MAPPINGWIDE: { [k: string]: number | undefined } = MAPPING;
    return MAPPINGWIDE[key] || 0;
}

Here MAPPINGWIDE only exists inside the lookup function, but we've told the compiler that all its properties are either number or undefined. The compiler allows us to assign MAPPING to it without any kind of assertion or loophole. If you change MAPPING to be const MAPPING = {A: 1, B: 2, oops: "hello"} the compiler will complain in your MAPPINGWIDE assignment. So it's only a little redundant (we have to copy MAPPING), and PERFECTLY SAFE, right?

Well, maybe not. Note that if you define MAPPING via weirdMapping above, then the code still compiles with no error. You can widen weirdMapping to MappingType and then assign the MappingType to MAPPINGWIDE, even though this is unsafe. And so lookup4("C") will produce a string value at runtime that the compiler thinks is a number. The code lookup4("C").toFixed() will blow up at runtime with no compiler warning.

This is the "sometimes illusory" type safety. Is it likely to be an issue? Probably not. But it's a judgment call whether this solution is any more or less hacky than the others.


Okay, hope that gives you some direction and possibly a different perspective. Good luck!

Playground link to code

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You can define the type of MAPPING as follows

const MAPPING: { [i: string]: number }= { "A": 1, "B": 2 }

function lookup1(key: string) {
   return MAPPING[key] || 0 
}
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  • This is another hack that lies to the type checker. Mapping can return undefined. It also breaks keyof typeof
    – fny
    Aug 8, 2020 at 16:18
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You can chain keyof typeof keywords to obtain key type of MAPPING object. And utilize a type guard like below.

const MAPPING = { "A": 1, "B": 2 }

type MAPKEY = keyof typeof MAPPING;

function lookup2(key: string) {
  if(!isKeyOFMapping(key)){
      return undefined;
  }

  return MAPPING[key]; // it is safe to use here
}


function isKeyOFMapping(key:string) : key is MAPKEY {
      return key in MAPPING;
}

const a = lookup2("A");
const c = lookup2("C");

console.log(a === 1);
console.log(c === undefined);
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  • 1
    I already address this as a possibility above, and I'm looking for an alterative. The issue is that you're lying to the type checker. Say you forget to add || 0. Everything looks okay because of the assertion, but you've just created a huge bug.
    – fny
    Aug 8, 2020 at 16:05
  • @fny The difference in my example it won't allow you to pass any other argument than "A" or "B"
    – Eldar
    Aug 8, 2020 at 16:07
  • But that's not what I want... I want to be able to return undefined so that in certain cases it can be overriden with a default.
    – fny
    Aug 8, 2020 at 16:17
  • @fny i get you now. You can use typeguard to achieve what you want.
    – Eldar
    Aug 8, 2020 at 16:25

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