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I am trying to split one large user given vector into x sub vectors. Everything "seems" to work as it should but the outcome is not right.

std::vector<std::vector<std::string>> split_to_sub_vectors(std::vector<std::string> initial_vector, int thread_amount) {

    std::cout << "initial size: " << initial_vector.size() << std::endl;

    int size_for_splitting = initial_vector.size();


    std::cout << "split amount: " << thread_amount << std::endl;

    int r = size_for_splitting / thread_amount;
    std::cout << r << " need to be in each sub-vector" << std::endl;

    std::cout << "There will be: " << size_for_splitting % thread_amount << " element remaining" << std::endl;

    std::vector<std::vector<std::string>> perm_vector;



    for (int x = 0; x < thread_amount; x++) {

        std::vector<std::string> temp_vector;

        for (int a = 0; a < r; a++) {
            
            hm++;
            std::cout << hm << std::endl;
            temp_vector.push_back(initial_vector[hm]);
        }

        perm_vector.push_back(temp_vector);



    }
 
    std::cout << "Size of vector holding the sub vectors after splitting: " << perm_vector.size() << std::endl;
   
    std::cout << perm_vector[0][0];
    return perm_vector;

Running this code will give you this:

initial size: 7
split amount: 3
2 need to be in each sub-vector
There will be: 1 element remaining
1
2
3
4
5
6
Size of vector holding the sub vectors after splitting: 3
2

the vector i pass in is called test holds strings and is like so:

    test.push_back("1");
    test.push_back("2");
    test.push_back("3");
    test.push_back("4");
    test.push_back("5");
    test.push_back("6");
    test.push_back("7");

Everything up until the last print statement seems to work. So perm_vector should hold 3 sub vectors containing every element in the main user given vector. When you print perm_vector[0][0] you would expect the output to be "1", but it is 2, also 7 should not be in the vector and 6 should be the last one but since it starts at 2, 7 is in it. the counter is defined outside of the function and it starts at 0. My question is why is it starting at 2?

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    Where is hm declared and initialized? It's not present in the code you posted. – 3Dave Aug 8 '20 at 20:47
  • global scope defined like so: int hm = 0; – cli Aug 8 '20 at 20:51
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    The gremlins on line 172 stole the first element. Prove me wrong with a minimal reproducible example. – user4581301 Aug 8 '20 at 20:51
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    Rethink using a global. Every time you call split_to_sub_vectors you'll have to reset the value to zero. Local variable sounds a lot more friendly. – user4581301 Aug 8 '20 at 20:52
1

Even if hm starts at 0, you increment it before you use it. Probably if you increment at the end of the internal for loop, you might get the output you expect. It's hard to tell the problem because I don't know what's in 'initial_vector', I assume initial_vector[0] = 1?

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  • @cli this is the correct answer. You're skipping the first element of initial_vector. – 3Dave Aug 8 '20 at 20:54
  • Well then it seems that you should increment hm after 'temp_vector.push_back(initial_vector[hm]);', otherwise you will miss index 0 – smorgasborgas Aug 8 '20 at 20:55
  • Almost certainly the right answer, but without a MRE for proof I'm standing by my claim of thieving Gremlins. – user4581301 Aug 8 '20 at 20:55
  • i just tested, this is indeed the fix – cli Aug 8 '20 at 22:10
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I see two problems in your code:

  1. hm is incremented before use. Furthermore, there is no point in making it global.
  2. size_for_splitting is the result of an integer division, so the remainder is missing

I modified your code so the issues with hm are solved. I get the intended output <<1, 2>, <3, 4>, <5, 6>>, the 7 is missing as mentioned above.

#include <iostream>
#include<vector>
#include<string>

std::vector<std::vector<std::string> > split_to_sub_vectors(std::vector<std::string> initial_vector, int thread_amount) {
    std::cout << "initial size: " << initial_vector.size() << std::endl;
    int size_for_splitting = initial_vector.size();
    std::cout << "split amount: " << thread_amount << std::endl;

    int r = size_for_splitting / thread_amount;
    std::cout << r << " need to be in each sub-vector" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "There will be: " << size_for_splitting % thread_amount << " element remaining" << std::endl;

    std::vector<std::vector<std::string> > perm_vector;

    int hm = 0;
    for (int x = 0; x < thread_amount; x++) {
        std::vector<std::string> temp_vector;
        for (int a = 0; a < r; a++) {
            std::cout << hm << std::endl;
            temp_vector.push_back(initial_vector[hm]);
            hm++;
        }
        perm_vector.push_back(temp_vector);
    }

    std::cout << "Size of vector holding the sub vectors after splitting: " << perm_vector.size() << std::endl;
    return perm_vector;
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<std::string> test;
    test.push_back("1");
    test.push_back("2");
    test.push_back("3");
    test.push_back("4");
    test.push_back("5");
    test.push_back("6");
    test.push_back("7");
    std::vector<std::vector<std::string> > out = split_to_sub_vectors(test, 3);
}
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    Good answer, but we typically try to avoid doing homework for students. :) – 3Dave Aug 8 '20 at 21:08
  • just gotta get some practice :) – sevsev Aug 8 '20 at 21:12
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    :) Been there, done that, many times over. Welcome to SO! – 3Dave Aug 8 '20 at 21:12
  • im not a student, but i am new to c++ :), way too young to be a student. Im making the switch from python to c++ and i could do this using numpy. – cli Aug 8 '20 at 22:09
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If you use the range-v3 library, implementing this logic becomes much easier, and less error prone:

#include <range/v3/all.hpp>

namespace rs = ranges;
namespace rv = ranges::views;

auto split_to_sub_vectors(std::vector<std::string> initial_vector, int thread_amount) {
    
    auto res = initial_vector 
             | rv::chunk(thread_amount) 
             | rs::to<std::vector<std::vector<std::string>>>;
     
    if (res.back().size() != thread_amount)
         res.pop_back();
  
    return res;
}

Here's a demo.

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