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In the Linux kernel source arch/arm64/kernel/head.S the boot requirements state it is necessary for the bootloader to enter with the D-cache off:

/*
 * Kernel startup entry point.
 * ---------------------------
 *
 * The requirements are:
 *   MMU = off, D-cache = off, I-cache = on or off,
 *   x0 = physical address to the FDT blob.
 ...
 */

Then, in the preserve_boot_args() function, there is a call to invalidate an area of the D-cache after loading arguments into the boot_args array

SYM_CODE_START_LOCAL(preserve_boot_args)
    mov x21, x0             // x21=FDT

    adr_l   x0, boot_args           // record the contents of
    stp x21, x1, [x0]           // x0 .. x3 at kernel entry
    stp x2, x3, [x0, #16]

    dmb sy              // needed before dc ivac with
                        // MMU off

    mov x1, #0x20           // 4 x 8 bytes
    b   __inval_dcache_area     // tail call
SYM_CODE_END(preserve_boot_args)

Why does the D-cache line need to be invalidated if the D-cache is off?

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    When the caches are off, they still respond to hits (i.e. if they are not invalidated and the software writes to a line already in the cache, that line is modified in the cache and never written to memory). There's an ARM doc stating this. My hypothesis is: the bootloader may have disabled but not invalidated the caches and since the address of the boot_args buffer is arbitrary, there's a small chance it's been cached by the firmware/bootloader. This happens if boot_args ends up in a previously accessed area of memory. Hence the invalidation. Aug 9, 2020 at 13:36
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    Is it possible that it is being invalidated so that it can be turned on at some point?
    – Erik Eidt
    Aug 9, 2020 at 14:54
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    @MargaretBloom then you mean if the cache is turned on later, the modified cache line is written to memory? I don't know what this 'D-cache is off' mean. From this link(developer.arm.com/documentation/ddi0344/b/level-2-memory-system/…) it sounds D-cache off means data goes directly to/from the memory.
    – Chan Kim
    Aug 19, 2020 at 4:34
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    @ChanKim When the D-cache is off, no new lines are fetched in the cache but the cache is not flushed, it still retains its data. Data bypasses the cache as long as it doesn't hit in the cache. If the cache is later turned on the lines it contains will be written to memory according to the replacement policy. If you cached a location and disabled the cache, that location will continue to be served from the cache (on the other way around, a non previously cached location will bypass it). Aug 19, 2020 at 7:54
  • @MargaretBloom "if they are not invalidated and the software writes to a line already in the cache, that line is modified in the cache and never written to memory. There's an ARM doc stating this". Could you point that doc please ? If what you said ("never written to memory") is true, it means that any writing into memory has to be accompanied by cache-flash. Otherwise some data might not reach memory ever. May 1, 2021 at 14:31

1 Answer 1

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Why does the D-cache line need to be invalidated if the D-cache is off?

These registers stp x21, x1, [x0] \ stp x2, x3, [x0, #16] are written into memory starting from boot_args address. Caches are off, so data would be written right into memory.

D-Cache is not affected by such writes. So D-Cache contains either data which it held just before it was turned off or some junk if chip was powered up.

By invalidating boot_args + 0x20 area, you guarantee that written data would be read later on from memory if D-cache is enabled.

Consider scenario:

  • written area is not invalidated
  • later on caches are enabled
  • D-Caches has line(s) that contains data from [boot_args .. boot_args + 0x20] memory area
  • [boot_args .. boot_args + 0x20] memory area is read back into registers

So in such case there would be cache hit and 'junk' from cache would go into registers, instead of 'right' data fetched from memory.

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