6

This MWE shows the use of tokio::spawn in for in loop. The commented code sleepy_futures.push(sleepy.sleep_n(2)); works fine, but does not run/poll the async function.

Basically, I would like to run a bunch of async functions at the same time. I am happy to change the implementation of Sleepy or use another library/technique.

pub struct Sleepy;
impl Sleepy {
    pub async fn sleep_n(self: &Self, n: u64) -> String {
        sleep(Duration::from_secs(n));
        "test".to_string()
    }
}

#[tokio::main(core_threads = 4)]
async fn main() {
    let sleepy = Sleepy{};

    let mut sleepy_futures = vec::Vec::new();
    for _ in 0..5 {
        // sleepy_futures.push(sleepy.sleep_n(2));
        sleepy_futures.push(tokio::task::spawn(sleepy.sleep_n(2)));
    }

    let results = futures::future::join_all(sleepy_futures).await;
    for result in results {
        println!("{}", result.unwrap())
    }
}
6
  • This is a great suggestion, yes I can. But in the actual project, Sleepy has a connection pool so I would like to share it.
    – chmoder
    Aug 10, 2020 at 20:26
  • 2
    It looks like since sleep_n references &self then it needs to have access to sleepy even once kicked off. If you get rid of that it should be fine. Otherwise it will need to have access to it. You can wrap it in an Rc<_> if you need to give access to multiple tasks.
    – tadman
    Aug 10, 2020 at 20:27
  • Why aren't you declaring it conventionally like pub async fn sleep_n(&self, ...)?
    – tadman
    Aug 10, 2020 at 20:28
  • 1
    Thanks for all these suggestions, join_all seems to run them synchronously, that is when I found task::spawn.
    – chmoder
    Aug 10, 2020 at 20:33
  • 2
    If you're using a hard sleep you're going to jam the reactor so it will appear to run them sequentially. Use Tokio sleep tools like delay_for. Rule #1 in asynchronous code: Never block the event loop. This is an easy thing to forget as Rust won't warn you about it, even though it should.
    – tadman
    Aug 10, 2020 at 20:34

1 Answer 1

2

Here's a rough stab at fixing it:

use tokio::time::delay_for;

pub struct Sleepy;
impl Sleepy {
    pub async fn sleep_n(n: u64) -> String {
        delay_for(Duration::from_secs(n)).await;
        "test".to_string()
    }
}

Where now it's no longer anchored to any particular Sleepy instance, eliminating the lifetime issue. You'd call it like Sleepy::sleep_n.

It takes a little more work if that &self is required:

use std::sync::Arc;
use std::time::Duration;
use std::vec;
use tokio;
use tokio::time::delay_for;

pub struct Sleepy;
impl Sleepy {
    pub async fn sleep_n(&self, n: u64) -> String {
        // Call .await here to delay properly
        delay_for(Duration::from_secs(n)).await;
        "test".to_string()
    }
}

#[tokio::main(core_threads = 4)]
async fn main() {
    env_logger::init();

    let sleepy = Arc::new(Sleepy {});

    let mut sleepy_futures = vec::Vec::new();
    for _ in 0..5 {
        let sleepy = sleepy.clone();

        // Dictate that values are moved into the task instead of 
        // being borrowed and dropped.  
        sleepy_futures.push(tokio::task::spawn(async move {
            sleepy.sleep_n(2).await
        }));
    }

    let results = futures::future::join_all(sleepy_futures).await;
    for result in results {
        println!("{}", result.unwrap())
    }
}

Here Arc is used to wrap the object since task may use threads, so Rc isn't sufficient.

3
  • This is a tough one. Here is a rust playground with the code sample. sleepy does not live long enough
    – chmoder
    Aug 10, 2020 at 20:48
  • I've updated the code with a working version. Thanks for making the sample.
    – tadman
    Aug 10, 2020 at 20:59
  • 1
    Thank you, well done! I even verified it works with the actual project.
    – chmoder
    Aug 10, 2020 at 21:05

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