3

Let's start with the example (godbolt):

constexpr int len(int v) {
    if (std::is_constant_evaluated()) {
        // static_assert(v > 0); // ERR: 'v' is not a constant expression
        return v;
    } else {
        return 0;
    }
}

using A = std::array<int, len(3)>;

The problem is, that the static_assert won't compile (gcc / clang latest 10.x releases). Apparently, v isn't realized to be constexpr when std::is_constant_evaluated returns true. But clearly, by the use of len, it actually is.

Question: Is it possible to use a variable as constexpr if and only if std::is_constant_evaluated? If so, how?

  • No, arguments to a function are never constant expressions (even if the function is being constant evaluated), so you can't do this. You'll have to pass v in as a template parameter or something like that. – cigien Aug 10 at 20:38
  • I believe the if needs to be a consexpr if for it to work. – ALX23z Aug 10 at 20:40
  • 1
    @ALX23z No that's definitely wrong. If it's an if constexpr then std::is_constant_evaluated is tautologically true. – cigien Aug 10 at 20:41
  • @cigien right... but this is inherently troublesome as now it is now a "non-constexpr if". And it creates limitations to written code. Guess constexpr programming is still far off from being done. – ALX23z Aug 10 at 20:48
  • @ALX23z I'm not sure what limitations you're thinking of. These comments will get removed, so perhaps you could post a question about your confusion. – cigien Aug 10 at 20:51
4

Apparently, v isn't realized to be constexpr when std::is_constant_evaluated returns true. But clearly, by the use of len, it actually is.

No, it's actually not.

Function parameters are not constant expressions. It doesn't matter if you're in the middle of constant evaluation or not. You cannot use v as a constant expression in any context. static_assert requires a constant expression - this is why you cannot use v.

Question: Is it possible to use a variable as constexpr if and only if std::is_constant_evaluated? If so, how?

No, it is not. Because in order to use a variable as a constant expression, well, that's a template. And is_constant_evaluated can't conditionally make your function into a function template, that's just not how the compilation process can work. See P0992.

| improve this answer | |
2

Not possible, but also unnecessary.

Instead of using a static_assert, you can throw something. Since you're in a constexpr context, it will give you a compile-time error.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Oh, nice workaround for static_assert :) – cigien Aug 10 at 20:42
  • Could you elaborate, why it's not possible / allowed? – m8mble Aug 10 at 20:45
  • @m8mble No idea, but that's how things work. At least now. – HolyBlackCat Aug 10 at 20:54
  • All those workaround about the language weakness make me think about those program developed by mechanical engineers that use Visual Basic within Excel to code simulations! – Oliv Aug 11 at 9:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.