20

If I have an Employee class with a default constructor:

private String firstName;
public Employee(){}

and a setter:

public void setFirstName(String firstName){
    this.firstName = firstName;
}

Why does this attempt fail to instantiate and call the setter in the same line?

Employee employee = new Employee().setFirstName("John");
24

You can also use this syntax:

Employee employee = new Employee() {{
    setFirstName("John");
}};

Though keep in mind that it's going to create an anonymous inner class and probably isn't what you want.

  • 1
    @whiskeysierra i mentioned it because lots of folks don't know about this syntax, and while it's easy to abuse, it also comes in handy every so often. ;) – stevevls Jun 13 '11 at 19:27
10

Because setFirstName doesn't return anything. If you want to chain methods then setFirstName would have to return Employee.

Another approach is to have a constructor that takes firstName as an argument.

3

The method serFirstName is of return type void (nothing). Try:

public Employee setFirstName(String fname) {
  this.firstName = fname;
  return this;
}
3
(employee = new Employee()).setFirstName("John");

performs instantiation and calling the setter, as you requested in the headline, but does not declare the variable as suggested in your code example.

(Employee employee = new Employee()).setFirstName("John");

will probably not work, I assume. But you can try.

Of course, you can always stuff multiple statements in one line.

Employee employee; (employee = new Employee()).setFirstName("John");

or

Employee employee = new Employee(); employee.setFirstName("John");

If I were you, I would settle for a parameterized constructor, though.

2

It should be like this:

Employee employee = new Employee();
employee.setFirstName("John");
  • 2
    The question was how to instantiate on the same line – Steve Kuo Jun 13 '11 at 19:39
  • 1
    @Steve yes but doing it on one line with a setter is poor style. The above is more idiomatic. – mR_fr0g Jun 13 '11 at 20:34
  • Just use the Builder pattern and make the setter return the whole object at the end. Problem solved. Elegantly. – Dino Prašo Aug 4 '17 at 18:45
1

Because the you want to set employee to the value of .setFirstName("John"); which does not return anything because it is a void

So you could either change your setter to:

public Employee setFirstName(String fname) {
  this.firstName = fname;
  return this;
}

OR Create a second constructor for Employee

public Employee(String fname){this.firstName = fname;}

Which would set firstname on init.

1

Although this is a bit overkill, you could try using the builder pattern

public class Employee{
    private String firstName;

    public static class Builder{
        private String firstName;

        public Builder firstName(String firstName){
            this.firstName = firstName;
            return this;
        }

        public Employee build(){
            return new Employee(this);
        }
    }

    private Employee(Builder builder){
        firstName = builder.firstName;
    }
}

Then you can do the following

Employee e = new Employee.Builder().firstName("John").build();
  • Why go though the trouble when you can just return the this at the end ov the setter? The you would get a valid Employee e = new Employee().setFirstName("John"); – Dino Prašo Aug 4 '17 at 18:46

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