1

I write a simple Program Like this:

SEC("tc_redirect")
int _egress_redirect(struct __sk_buff *skb){
    return bpf_redirect(5,0); // redirect all egress packets to interface 5
}
# tc filter add dev (4) egress prio 1 handle 1 bpf da obj x.o sec tc_redirect

Sender redirects packet to interface 5 and receiver receives packet in peer interface but program like iperf dont receive it, why?

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  • 1
    Simple note for future readers: the tc command provided here is used to load the program as a TC filter, not as a XDP program as the title and tags suggest. – Qeole Aug 11 '20 at 7:53
1

If you can observe the packet arrive at the receiver's interface (ex. with tcpdump) but not in your userspace process, then the packet is probably dropped by the kernel in between.

You should check that the destination IP, the destination MAC address, and the destination port are correct. You can also use the following bcc script to see which kernel function dropped the packets. Searching for that function on e.g. bootlin can then give you some indication as to what is happening.

#!/usr/bin/python
#
# packetdrop  Prints the kernel functions responsible for packet drops. Similar
#             to dropwatch.
#
# REQUIRES: Linux 4.7+ (BPF_PROG_TYPE_TRACEPOINT support).
#
# Copyright 2018 Orange.
# Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License")
from __future__ import print_function
from bcc import BPF
from time import sleep

# load BPF program
b = BPF(text="""
struct key_t {
    u64 location;
};
BPF_HASH(drops, struct key_t);
TRACEPOINT_PROBE(skb, kfree_skb) {
    u64 zero = 0, *count;
    struct key_t key = {};
    // args is from /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/events/skb/kfree_skb/format
    key.location = (u64)args->location;
    count = drops.lookup_or_init(&key, &zero);
    (*count)++;
    return 0;
};
""")

# header
print("Tracing... Ctrl-C to end.")

# format output
try:
    sleep(99999999)
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    pass

print("\n%-16s %-26s %8s" % ("ADDR", "FUNC", "COUNT"))
drops = b.get_table("drops")
print(drops.items()[0][1].value)
for k, v in sorted(drops.items(),
                   key=lambda elem: elem[1].value):
    print("%-16x %-26s %8d"
          % (k.location, b.ksym(k.location), v.value))
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  • For the record, I think dropwatch might help too, although I've never used it. – Qeole Aug 11 '20 at 7:40

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