27

I have two tabels with a relation and I want to update a field in table A. Is it possible to combine update and join in the same query? I googled it but didnt find any working solution?

UPDATE md SET md.status = '3' 
FROM pd_mounting_details AS md 
LEFT OUTER JOIN pd_order_ecolid AS oe ON md.order_data = oe.id

I'm using MS SQL

  • The addition of that code indicates an error, what are you CROSS joining to? – JonH Jun 13 '11 at 19:55
  • @JohnH Sorry, the cross join where not ment to be there, visual studio adds that automaticly for some reason.. – Evilaid Jun 13 '11 at 20:01
  • 3
    Please accept an answer... – JonH Jan 24 '18 at 17:40
50
Update t 
SET 
       t.Column1=100
FROM 
       myTableA t 
LEFT JOIN 
       myTableB t2 
ON 
       t2.ID=t.ID

Replace myTableA with your table name and replace Column1 with your column name. After this simply LEFT JOIN to tableB. t in this case is just an alias for myTableA

  • OK, thats about what i tried: Like this: UPDATE md SET md.status = '3' FROM pd_mounting_details AS md LEFT JOIN pd_order_ecolid AS oe ON md.order_data = oe.id – Evilaid Jun 13 '11 at 19:47
  • @Evilaid - I've added this code to the question. It will help to answer it. – user532231 Jun 13 '11 at 19:50
  • @Evailaid as long as order_data is the same type of id from oe than I see no issue. – JonH Jun 13 '11 at 19:51
  • Should it be pd_mounting_details (underscore added)? Also note that if you are using '3' and not a value from pd_order_ecolid, this is the same as updating without a join. Perhaps you're either looking to use an inner join or a "WHERE oe.<non-nullable column> IS NOT NULL? – Phil Helmer Jun 13 '11 at 20:06
  • 3
    The outer joined version is pointless because every row will get updated anyway. The inner joined version is unnecessary - a EXISTS subquery achieves the same thing (and unlike the buggy join syntax, EXISTS is standard SQL.) – nvogel Jun 13 '11 at 21:40
7

If what you need is UPDATE from SELECT statement you can do something like this:

UPDATE suppliers    
SET city = (SELECT customers.city FROM customers

WHERE customers.customer_name = suppliers.supplier_name)
4

Just another example where the value of a column from table 1 is inserted into a column in table 2:

UPDATE  Address
SET     Phone1 = sp.Phone
FROM    Address ad LEFT JOIN Speaker sp
ON      sp.AddressID = ad.ID
WHERE   sp.Phone <> '' 
  • This is the most appropriate answer. – Sri Mar 27 at 21:27
2

The Left join in this query is pointless:

UPDATE md SET md.status = '3' 
FROM pd_mounting_details AS md 
LEFT OUTER JOIN pd_order_ecolid AS oe ON md.order_data = oe.id

It would update all rows of pd_mounting_details, whether or not a matching row exists in pd_order_ecolid. If you wanted to only update matching rows, it should be an inner join.

If you want to apply some condition based on the join occurring or not, you need to add a WHERE clause and/or a CASE expression in your SET clause.

0

In mysql the SET clause needs to come after the JOIN. Example:

UPDATE e
    LEFT JOIN a ON a.id = e.aid
    SET e.id = 2
    WHERE  
        e.type = 'user' AND
        a.country = 'US';

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