81

I have created android build of my Flutter application.

Then I created an internal testing release. It is showing a warning

This App Bundle contains native code, and you've not uploaded debug symbols. We recommend you upload a symbol file to make your crashes and ANRs easier to analyze and debug.

Basically what I had to do is add following to build.gradle file according to the link they show.

android.buildTypes.release.ndk.debugSymbolLevel = { SYMBOL_TABLE | FULL }

I assume it is android/app/build.gradle they are talking about.

Not sure exactly where in that file I have to add this line.

Can someone point out where to add this line?

2
118

To use the option ndk debugSymbolLevel as written in the docs you need an android gradle plugin 4.1 or later. At the time of writing the lastest 4.1 version is 4.1.2

You will need also to install ndk and cmake for android studio.

In your android build.gradle you need the to set android gradle plugin version 4.1.2:

buildscript {
    ...
    repositories {
        google()
        jcenter()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath 'com.android.tools.build:gradle:4.1.2'
        ...
    }

Then in the android/app build.gradle add:

...
android {
    ...
    // you see the ndk version in the android studio sdk-manager
    // have a look also here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/65747847/9481613
    ndkVersion "21.3.6528147" 
    ...
    buildTypes {
        release {
            ...
            ndk {
                debugSymbolLevel 'SYMBOL_TABLE'
            }
        }   
    }
}

when you then run: flutter build appbundle it should finish after a while with an appbundle that is twice the size.

12
  • 2
    Minimum gradle-6.6.1-all.zip in gradle-wrapper.properties required for latest gradle (4.2.0-alpha12') plugin Sep 25 '20 at 5:22
  • 3
    gradle-6.5 is the minimum. Just change the plugin version: classpath 'com.android.tools.build:gradle:4.1.0' in the top level gradle file. This will prompt to fix gradle and will install 6.5. Keep in mind, this required android studio version 4.1 or higher. Oct 16 '20 at 4:25
  • 1
    Amazing, thank you! Question: why choose 'SYMBOL_TABLE' over 'FULL' ?
    – pierrea
    Oct 23 '20 at 17:35
  • 1
    Hi @pierrea, both attributes are described in the first link of the answer. Bascially its how much debug information you want to include: Note: There is a 300 MB limit for the native debug symbols file. If your debug symbols footprint is too large, use SYMBOL_TABLE instead of FULL to decrease the file size.
    – Adam
    Oct 25 '20 at 9:39
  • 1
    If the appbundle is twice the size, does the app on the play store also doubles the size?
    – kyu
    May 12 '21 at 7:13
36

There's two places in the app/build.gradle where you can specify bundling of debugging symbols with your app. If you use android.defaultConfig.ndk.debugSymbolLevel it will apply it to all build types (i.e., both debug and release builds). On the other hand, if you use android.buildTypes.release.ndk.debugSymbolLevel it will apply only to your release build.

These options have to be added into your app/build.gradle file as you correctly guessed. When you see a build property that's in this dotted notation, it actually corresponds to nested blocks in the build.gradle, which would look a bit like this:

android {
    compileSdkVersion 28
    defaultConfig {
        applicationId 'com.example.foo'
        minSdkVersion 23
        targetSdkVersion 28
        versionCode 42
        versionName "4.0.2"
        ndk {
            debugSymbolLevel 'SYMBOL_TABLE'
        }
    }
    // Rest of the file
}

HTH

5
  • 4
    Where I can find a file to upload on playstore ?
    – Web.11
    Feb 6 '21 at 12:49
  • 1
    Read here developer.android.com/studio/build/… Mar 2 '21 at 17:05
  • 2
    Native debug symbols are included in app bundle, but if you use apk they are located here: app/build/outputs/native-debug-symbols/variant-name/native-debug-symbols.zip
    – Zoran
    Jul 8 '21 at 11:03
  • 1
    Is it meaningless to add symbol files to an obfuscating bundle? On one hand I want to difficult reverse engineer, on the other hand I want to be able to read my stackTrace (I'm using firebase crashalytics) @Alberto Nov 7 '21 at 11:13
  • That's not a problem. The proguard mappings and unstripped libraries are never sent to users when they install your app so there's no reverse engineering possible. It is all securely stored in Play Console and used for the crash reporting features.
    – Alberto
    Nov 7 '21 at 15:58
2

Use Android Version 4.1 and above currently 4.1 RC 3 and 4.2 Canary 13 is available, and similarly use com.android.tools.build:gradle 4.1 and above, you can search for the suitable version from here

Then use this line in android -> defaultConfig in your app build.gradle file

    ndk { debugSymbolLevel 'FULL' }
0

If none of solutions work, you can also create a Sample JNI Application from Android Studio's project templates. Build it and check whether it got built successfully and installed on a device.

I have inspected its app build.gradle, check my Flutter's build.gradle and I added to make it work:

defaultConfig {

    // append below:
    externalNativeBuild {
            cmake {
                cppFlags "-std=c++17"
            }
        }
}

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