10

I'm trying to clean up a database by matching a messy list of site names with an approved list.

As an example, the preferred site name might be 'Cotswold Water Park Pit 28' but the site has been entered into the database as: 'Pit 28', '28', 'CWP Pit 28', and 'Cotswold 28'.

The data looks something like this:

approved <- c("Cotswold Water Park Pit 28", "Cotswold Water Park Pit 14", "Robinswood Hill")

messy <- c("Pit 28", "28", "CWP Pit 28", "Cotswold 28", "14", "Robinswood")

I'm looking for a way to match the words/numbers (clusters of non-space characters) in each element in messy with the words/numbers in each element in approved. Ideally I'd end up with something like this:

     Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 14 Robinswood Hill
[1,] "Pit 28"                   "Pit 28"                   "Robinswood"   
[2,] "28"                       "CWP Pit 28"               NA             
[3,] "CWP Pit 28"               "14"                       NA             
[4,] "Cotswold 28"              NA                         NA   

The approved elements form the column names and any elements from messy which containg matching words/numbers appear in the cells of that column. I recognise there will be some false matches. This is fine, I can filter them manually later and might exclude common words like 'forest' and 'hill' from the pattern matching.

I've been able to get the result I want with the above sample data by splitting each element in messy using regex but then I'm dealing with lists of words/numbers from a list of site names and I've been having to use nested loops or sapply to match them to the elements in approved because functions like grep, grepl and str_detect only allow for one pattern. As the database is big this has been taking a long time when I apply it to the whole thing. What I'd really like is a function which does:

match(any word in approved[1], any word in messy[1])

Either giving me a TRUE FALSE output or extracting messy[1] if it matches would be great!

1
  • 1
    Why "Cotswold 28" does not match with "Cotswold Water Park Pit 14"? "Cotswold" is common between them. – Ronak Shah Sep 2 '20 at 2:39
5
+50

and here is a highly flexible regex_join solution

library( fuzzyjoin )
library( data.table )
#make data.frames
messy.df <- data.frame( messy ); approved.df <- data.frame( approved )
#create regexes
messy.df$regex <- gsub( " ", "|", messy.df$messy )
#regex join
ans <- regex_full_join( approved.df, messy.df, by = c("approved" = "regex") )
#cast to wide
dcast( setDT(ans), messy~approved, value.var = "messy")[, -1]

#      Cotswold Water Park Pit 14 Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 Robinswood Hill
#   1:                         14                       <NA>            <NA>
#   2:                       <NA>                         28            <NA>
#   3:                 CWP Pit 28                 CWP Pit 28            <NA>
#   4:                Cotswold 28                Cotswold 28            <NA>
#   5:                     Pit 28                     Pit 28            <NA>
#   6:                       <NA>                       <NA>      Robinswood
6

Maybe you are looking for adist:

x <- adist(messy, approved, fixed=FALSE, ignore.case = TRUE)
y <- t(adist(approved, messy, fixed=FALSE, ignore.case = TRUE))
i <- x == apply(x, 1, min)
y[!i]  <- NA
colnames(y) <- approved
i <- apply(y == apply(y, 1, min, na.rm=TRUE), 2, function(i) messy[i & !is.na(i)])
do.call(cbind, lapply(i, function(x) x[seq_len(max(lengths(i)))]))
#     Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 14 Robinswood Hill
#[1,] "Pit 28"                   "14"                       "Robinswood"   
#[2,] "28"                       NA                         NA             
#[3,] "CWP Pit 28"               NA                         NA             
#[4,] "Cotswold 28"              NA                         NA             
6

A base R option would be :

result <- sapply(approved, function(x) grep(gsub('\\s+', '|', x), messy, value = TRUE))
result
#$`Cotswold Water Park Pit 28`
#[1] "Pit 28"      "28"          "CWP Pit 28"  "Cotswold 28"

#$`Cotswold Water Park Pit 14`
#[1] "Pit 28"      "CWP Pit 28"  "Cotswold 28" "14"         

#$`Robinswood Hill`
#[1] "Robinswood"

The logic here is that we insert pipe (|) symbol at every whitespace in approved and return the word in messy if any word matches.

To get output in the same format as shown we can do :

sapply(result, `[`, 1:max(lengths(result)))

#     Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 14 Robinswood Hill
#[1,] "Pit 28"                   "Pit 28"                   "Robinswood"   
#[2,] "28"                       "CWP Pit 28"               NA             
#[3,] "CWP Pit 28"               "Cotswold 28"              NA             
#[4,] "Cotswold 28"              "14"                       NA   
5

A tidyverse/tidytext solution

First turn them into data frames

require(tidyverse) 
require(tidytext)


## create dataframe for approved 

approved <- c("Cotswold Water Park Pit 28", "Cotswold Water Park Pit 14", "Robinswood Hill")


## create dataframe for messy 

messy <- c("Pit 28", "28", "CWP Pit 28", "Cotswold 28", "14", "Robinswood")

Then use tidytext to split them into 1 word = 1 row, I like to add ID's whenever the number of rows changes ...

## split into words 

approved_df <- 
tibble(approved = approved) %>%  
  rownames_to_column('approved_id') %>% 
  unnest_tokens(words, approved, 'words', drop = FALSE)

approved_df %>%  head 

# A tibble: 6 x 3
# approved_id approved                   words   
# <chr>       <chr>                      <chr>   
# 1 1           Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 cotswold
# 2 1           Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 water   
# 3 1           Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 park    
# 4 1           Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 pit     
# 5 1           Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 28      
# 6 2           Cotswold Water Park Pit 14 cotswold
    
messy_df <- 
tibble(messy = messy) %>%  
  rownames_to_column('messy_id') %>% 
  unnest_tokens(words, messy, 'words', drop = FALSE)

messy_df %>%  head          
# # A tibble: 6 x 3
# messy_id messy      words
# <chr>    <chr>      <chr>
# 1 1        Pit 28     pit  
# 2 1        Pit 28     28   
# 3 2        28         28   
# 4 3        CWP Pit 28 cwp  
# 5 3        CWP Pit 28 pit  
# 6 3        CWP Pit 28 28   

Finally, join the two dataframes at the word level, count how many words in the overlap, then assign each "messy" string an "approved one

     ## join the data sets and rank by the number of words in the overlap
  
  messy_df %>%  left_join(approved_df) %>%  
    group_by(messy, messy_id, approved, approved_id) %>%  
    summarise(n_row = n()) %>%  
    ungroup %>%  
    group_by(messy, messy_id) %>%  
    mutate(approved_rank = rank(desc(n_row))) %>%  
    ungroup %>%  
    filter(approved_rank == 1) %>%  
    arrange(messy_id)



  # Joining, by = "words"
  # # A tibble: 6 x 6
  # messy       messy_id approved                   approved_id n_row approved_rank
  # <chr>       <chr>    <chr>                      <chr>       <int>         <dbl>
  # 1 Pit 28      1        Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 1               2             1
  # 2 28          2        Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 1               1             1
  # 3 CWP Pit 28  3        Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 1               2             1
  # 4 Cotswold 28 4        Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 1               2             1
  # 5 14          5        Cotswold Water Park Pit 14 2               1             1
  # 6 Robinswood  6        Robinswood Hill            3               1             1
4
  • Thanks Mouad_Seridi! I get two errors when using your example: 1) when I run 'approved_df %>% head' I get 'Error in check_dots_used(action = warn) : unused argument (action = warn)' – James Sep 1 '20 at 10:19
  • 2) when I try and join and rank the data sets I get 'Error: n() should only be called in a data context Run rlang::last_error() to see where the error occurred.' When I run 'rlang::last_error(): <error/rlang_error> n() should only be called in a data context Backtrace: 1. dplyr::left_join(., approved_df) 1. dplyr::group_by(., messy, messy_id, approved, approved_id) 8. plyr::summarise(., n_row = n()) 9. [ base::eval(...) ] with 1 more call 11. dplyr::n() 12. dplyr:::from_context("..group_size") 13. %||%(...) Run rlang::last_trace()` to see the full context. – James Sep 1 '20 at 10:19
  • This code runs exactly as written for me. Is the questioner trying to apply this to a different problem? – Adam Sampson Sep 1 '20 at 18:39
  • In my experience, this tidy method of analyzing text is also the fastest. It will be much faster than fuzzy matching or string distances. – Adam Sampson Sep 1 '20 at 18:40
4

Here is one possibility using stringi (which is faster than stringr and usually faster than base R regex operations. This solution returns a list which should be more efficient than a matrix when you have variable lengths.

library(stringi)
messy_ors <- stri_replace_all(messy, " ", "|")  
lapply(approved, function(x) messy[stri_detect(x, regex = messy_ors)]) 

$`Cotswold Water Park Pit 28`
[1] "Pit 28"      "28"          "CWP Pit 28"  "Cotswold 28"

$`Cotswold Water Park Pit 14`
[1] "Pit 28"      "CWP Pit 28"  "Cotswold 28" "14"         

$`Robinswood Hill`
[1] "Robinswood"

If you really need a matrix you can convert the output with something like:

n <- max(lengths(out))
sapply(out, function(x) x[1:n])
3

I am not sure if my attempt below fits your purpose

res <- within(
  expand.grid(messy, approved),
  matched <- do.call(
    function(...) lengths(mapply(intersect, ...)) > 0,
    unname(expand.grid(strsplit(messy, " "), strsplit(approved, " ")))
  )
)

giving

          Var1                       Var2 matched
1       Pit 28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 28    TRUE
2           28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 28    TRUE
3   CWP Pit 28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 28    TRUE
4  Cotswold 28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 28    TRUE
5           14 Cotswold Water Park Pit 28   FALSE
6   Robinswood Cotswold Water Park Pit 28   FALSE
7       Pit 28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 14    TRUE
8           28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 14   FALSE
9   CWP Pit 28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 14    TRUE
10 Cotswold 28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 14    TRUE
11          14 Cotswold Water Park Pit 14    TRUE
12  Robinswood Cotswold Water Park Pit 14   FALSE
13      Pit 28            Robinswood Hill   FALSE
14          28            Robinswood Hill   FALSE
15  CWP Pit 28            Robinswood Hill   FALSE
16 Cotswold 28            Robinswood Hill   FALSE
17          14            Robinswood Hill   FALSE
18  Robinswood            Robinswood Hill    TRUE

If you want to get an output shown in your post, you can play some tricks further on res, e.g.,

res2 <- do.call(
  cbind,
  lapply(
    u <- with(subset(res, matched), split(Var1, Var2)),
    function(x) `length<-`(as.vector(x), max(lengths(u)))
  )
)

such that

> res2
     Cotswold Water Park Pit 28 Cotswold Water Park Pit 14 Robinswood Hill
[1,] "Pit 28"                   "Pit 28"                   "Robinswood"
[2,] "28"                       "CWP Pit 28"               NA
[3,] "CWP Pit 28"               "Cotswold 28"              NA
[4,] "Cotswold 28"              "14"                       NA

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