81

Consider a standard for loop:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) 
{
   // do something with i
}

I want to prevent the variable i from being modified in the body of the for loop.

However, I cannot declare i as const as this makes the increment statement invalid. Is there a way to make i a const variable outside of the increment statement?

  • 4
    I believe there is no way to do this – Itay Aug 13 at 16:55
  • 26
    This sounds like a solution in search of a problem. – Pete Becker Aug 13 at 17:58
  • 14
    Turn the body of your for-loop into a function with a const int i argument. The mutability of the index is only exposed where it's needed and you can use the inline keyword to make it have no effect on the compiled output. – Monty Thibault Aug 14 at 2:15
  • 4
    What (or rather, who) could possibly change the value of the index besides.... you? Do you distrust yourself? Maybe a co-worker? I agree with @PeteBecker. – Z4-tier Aug 14 at 20:51
  • 4
    @Z4-tier Yes, of course I distrust myself. I know that I make mistakes. Every good programmer knows. That's why we have things like const to begin with. – Konrad Rudolph Aug 16 at 11:29
117

From c++20, you can use ranges::views::iota like this:

for (int const i : std::views::iota(0, 10))
{
   std::cout << i << " ";  // ok
   i = 42;                 // error
}

Here's a demo.


From c++11, you can also use the following technique, which uses an IIILE (immediately invoked inline lambda expression):

int x = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) [&,i] {
    std::cout << i << " ";  // ok, i is readable
    i = 42;                 // error, i is captured by non-mutable copy
    x++;                    // ok, x is captured by mutable reference
}();     // IIILE

Here's a demo.

Note that [&,i] means that i is captured by non-mutable copy, and everything else is captured by mutable reference. The (); at the end of the loop simply means that the lambda is invoked immediately.

| improve this answer | |
  • Almost calls for a special for loop construct since what this offers is a safer alternative to a very, very common construct. – Michael Dorgan Aug 13 at 17:48
  • 2
    @MichaelDorgan Well, now that there's library support for this feature, it won't be worth adding it as a core language feature. – cigien Aug 13 at 22:05
  • 1
    Fair, though almost all my real work is still C or C++11 at most. I study just in case it matters in the future for me... – Michael Dorgan Aug 13 at 22:08
  • 9
    The C++11 trick you added with the lambda is neat, but wouldn't be practical in most workplaces I have been in. Static analysis would complain on the generalized & capture, which would force capturing each reference explicitly -- which makes this quite cumbersome. I also suspect that this could lead to easy bugs where an author forgets the (), making the code never get invoked. This is easily small enough to miss in code-review as well. – Human-Compiler Aug 14 at 15:23
  • 1
    @cigien Static analysis tools like SonarQube and cppcheck flag general captures like [&] because these conflict with coding standards like AUTOSAR (Rule A5-1-2), HIC++, and I think also MISRA (not sure). It's not that it's not correct; it's that organizations ban this type of code to be compliant with standards. As for the (), the newest gcc version does not flag this even with -Wextra. I still think the approach is neat; it just doesn't work for many organizations. – Human-Compiler Aug 18 at 19:43
44

For anyone that likes Cigien's std::views::iota answer but isn't working in C++20 or above, it's rather straightforward to implement a simplified and lightweight version of std::views::iota compatible or above.

All it requires is:

  • A basic "LegacyInputIterator" type (something that defines operator++ and operator*) that wraps an integral value (e.g. an int)
  • Some "range"-like class that has begin() and end() that returns the above iterators. This will allow it to work in range-based for loops

A simplified version of this could be:

#include <iterator>

// This is just a class that wraps an 'int' in an iterator abstraction
// Comparisons compare the underlying value, and 'operator++' just
// increments the underlying int
class counting_iterator
{
public:
    // basic iterator boilerplate
    using iterator_category = std::input_iterator_tag;
    using value_type = int;
    using reference  = int;
    using pointer    = int*;
    using difference_type = std::ptrdiff_t;

    // Constructor / assignment
    constexpr explicit counting_iterator(int x) : m_value{x}{}
    constexpr counting_iterator(const counting_iterator&) = default;
    constexpr counting_iterator& operator=(const counting_iterator&) = default;

    // "Dereference" (just returns the underlying value)
    constexpr reference operator*() const { return m_value; }
    constexpr pointer operator->() const { return &m_value; }

    // Advancing iterator (just increments the value)
    constexpr counting_iterator& operator++() {
        m_value++;
        return (*this);
    }
    constexpr counting_iterator operator++(int) {
        const auto copy = (*this);
        ++(*this);
        return copy;
    }

    // Comparison
    constexpr bool operator==(const counting_iterator& other) const noexcept {
        return m_value == other.m_value;
    }
    constexpr bool operator!=(const counting_iterator& other) const noexcept {
        return m_value != other.m_value;
    }
private:
    int m_value;
};

// Just a holder type that defines 'begin' and 'end' for
// range-based iteration. This holds the first and last element
// (start and end of the range)
// The begin iterator is made from the first value, and the
// end iterator is made from the second value.
struct iota_range
{
    int first;
    int last;
    constexpr counting_iterator begin() const { return counting_iterator{first}; }
    constexpr counting_iterator end() const { return counting_iterator{last}; }
};

// A simple helper function to return the range
// This function isn't strictly necessary, you could just construct
// the 'iota_range' directly
constexpr iota_range iota(int first, int last)
{
    return iota_range{first, last};
}

I've defined the above with constexpr where it's supported, but for earlier versions of C++ like C++11/14, you may need to remove constexpr where it is not legal in those versions to do so.

The above boilerplate enables the following code to work in pre-C++20:

for (int const i : iota(0, 10))
{
   std::cout << i << " ";  // ok
   i = 42;                 // error
}

Which will generate the same assembly as the C++20 std::views::iota solution and the classic for-loop solution when optimized.

This works with any C++11-compliant compilers (e.g. compilers like gcc-4.9.4) and still produces nearly identical assembly to a basic for-loop counterpart.

Note: The iota helper function is just for feature-parity with the C++20 std::views::iota solution; but realistically, you could also directly construct an iota_range{...} instead of calling iota(...). The former just presents an easy upgrade path if a user wishes to switch to C++20 in the future.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    It requires a bit of boilerplate, but it's actually not all that complicated in terms of what it's doing. It's actually just a basic iterator pattern, but wrapping an int, then creating a "range" class to return the begin/end – Human-Compiler Aug 14 at 14:32
  • 1
    Not super important, but I also added a c++11 solution that no one else posted, so you might want to reword the first line of your answer slightly :) – cigien Aug 14 at 15:21
  • I'm not sure who downvoted, but I'd appreciate some feedback if you feel that my answer is unsatisfactory so that I may improve upon it. Downvoting is a great way to show that you feel an answer does not adequately address the question, but in this case there are no existing criticisms or obvious faults in the answer for which I may improve. – Human-Compiler Aug 14 at 16:33
  • @Human-Compiler I got a DV at the same time too, and they didn't comment on why either :( Guess someone doesn't like the range abstractions. I wouldn't worry about it. – cigien Aug 14 at 17:46
  • 1
    "assembly" is a mass noun like "luggage" or "water". The normal phrasing would be "will compile to the same assembly as the C++20 ...". The compiler's asm output for a single function isn't a singular assembly, it's "assembly" (a sequence of assembly-language instructions). – Peter Cordes Aug 14 at 19:07
29

The KISS version...

for (int _i = 0; _i < 10; ++_i) {
    const int i = _i;

    // use i here
}

If your use case is just to prevent accidental modification of the loop index then this should make such a bug obvious. (If you want to prevent intentional modification, well, good luck...)

| improve this answer | |
  • 11
    I think you teach the wrong lesson to use magical identifiers which start with _. And a bit of explanation (e.g. scope) would be helpful. Otherwise, yes, nicely KISSy. – Yunnosch Aug 14 at 6:13
  • 13
    Calling the "hidden" variable i_ would be more compliant. – Yirkha Aug 14 at 13:08
  • 9
    I'm not sure how this answers the question. The loop variable is _i which is still modifiable in the loop. – cigien Aug 14 at 14:57
  • 4
    @cigien: IMO, this partial solution is as far as it's worth going without C++20 std::views::iota for a fully bulletproof way. The text of the answer explains its limitations and how it attempts to answer the question. A bunch of over-complicated C++11 makes the cure worse than the disease in terms of easy to read, easily maintainable, IMO. This is still very easy to read for everyone who knows C++, and seems reasonable as an idiom. (But should avoid leading-underscore names.) – Peter Cordes Aug 14 at 19:11
  • 5
    @Yunnosch only _Uppercase and double__underscore identifiers are reserved. _lowercase identifiers are only reserved in the global scope. – Roman Odaisky Aug 14 at 20:36
13

If you do not have access to , typical makeover using a function

#include <vector>
#include <numeric> // std::iota

std::vector<int> makeRange(const int start, const int end) noexcept
{
   std::vector<int> vecRange(end - start);
   std::iota(vecRange.begin(), vecRange.end(), start);
   return vecRange;
}

now you could

for (const int i : makeRange(0, 10))
{
   std::cout << i << " ";  // ok
   //i = 100;              // error
}

(See a Demo)


Update: Inspired from the @Human-Compiler's comment, I was wondering weather the given answers have any difference in the case of performance. It turn out that, except for this approach, for all other approaches surprisingly have same performance (for the range [0, 10)). The std::vector approach is the worst.

enter image description here

(See Online Quick-Bench)

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Although this works for pre-c++20, this has a pretty large amount of overhead since it requires using vector. If the range is very large, this could be bad. – Human-Compiler Aug 13 at 17:16
  • @Human-Compiler: A std::vector is pretty terrible on a relative scale if the range is small, too, and could be very bad if this was supposed to be a small inner loop that ran many many times. Some compilers (like clang with libc++, but not libstdc++) can optimize away new/delete of an allocation that doesn't escape the function, but otherwise this could easily be the difference between a small fully-unrolled loop vs. a call to new + delete, and maybe actually storing into that memory. – Peter Cordes Aug 14 at 19:00
  • IMO, the minor benefit of const i is simply not worth the overhead for most cases, without C++20 ways that make it cheap. Especially with runtime-variable ranges that make it less likely for the compiler to optimize everything away. – Peter Cordes Aug 14 at 19:03
13

Couldn't you just move some or all the content of your for loop in a function that accepts i as a const?

Its less optimal than some solutions proposed, but if possible this is quite simple to do.

Edit: Just an example as I tend to be unclear.

for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) 
{
   looper( i );
}

void looper ( const int v )
{
    // do your thing here
}
| improve this answer | |
10

And here is a C++11 version:

for (int const i : {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10})
{
    std::cout << i << " ";
    // i = 42; // error
}

Here is live demo

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    This doesn't scale if the max number is decided by a runtime value. – Human-Compiler Aug 13 at 17:13
  • 10
    @Human-Compiler Simply extend the list to the desired value and recompile your entire program dynamically ;) – Monty Thibault Aug 14 at 2:24
  • 5
    You didn't mention what is the case of {..}. You need to include something to get this feature active. For example, your code will break if you do not add proper headers: godbolt.org/z/esbhra. Relaying on <iostream> for other headers is a bad idea! – JeJo Aug 14 at 5:09
6
#include <cstdio>
  
#define protect(var) \
  auto &var ## _ref = var; \
  const auto &var = var ## _ref

int main()
{
  for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) 
  {
    {
      protect(i);
      // do something with i
      //
      printf("%d\n", i);
      i = 42; // error!! remove this and it compiles.
    }
  }
}

Note: we need to nest the scope because of an astonishing stupidity in the language: the variable declared in the for(...) header is considered to be at the same nesting level as variables declared in the {...} compound statement. This means that, for instance:

for (int i = ...)
{
  int i = 42; // error: i redeclared in same scope
}

What? Didn't we just open a curly brace? Moreover, it's inconsistent:

void fun(int i)
{
  int i = 42; // OK
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is easily the best answer. Leveraging C++'s 'variable shadowing' to cause the identifier to resolve to a const ref variable referencing the original step variable, is an elegant solution. Or at least, the most elegant one available. – Max Barraclough Aug 15 at 13:48
4

One simple approach not yet mentioned here that works in any version of C++ is to create a functional wrapper around a range, similar to what std::for_each does to iterators. The user is then responsible for passing in a functional argument as a callback which will be invoked on each iteration.

For example:

// A struct that holds the start and end value of the range
struct numeric_range
{
    int start;
    int end;

    // A simple function that wraps the 'for loop' and calls the function back
    template <typename Fn>
    void for_each(const Fn& fn) const {
        for (auto i = start; i < end; ++i) {
            const auto& const_i = i;
            fn(const_i);
        }
    }
};

Where the use would be:

numeric_range{0, 10}.for_each([](const auto& i){
   std::cout << i << " ";  // ok
   //i = 100;              // error
});

Anything older than C++11 would be stuck passing a strongly-named function pointer into for_each (similar to std::for_each), but it still works.

Here's a demo


Although this may not be idiomatic for for loops in C++, this approach is quite common in other languages. Functional wrappers are really sleek for their composability in complex statements and can be very ergonomic for use.

This code is also simple to write, understand, and maintain.

| improve this answer | |
  • One limitation to be aware of with this approach is that some organizations ban default captures on lambdas (e.g. [&] or [=]) to be compliant with certain safety standards, which may bloat the lambda with each member needing to be captured manually. Not all organizations do this, so I'm only mentioning this as a comment rather than in the answer. – Human-Compiler Aug 20 at 12:49

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