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I want to force a type object to satisfy a type pattern like so:

type Color = string
type Intent = 'primary' | 'secondary' | 'error'

// This doesn't work
type IntentColors: Record<Intent, Color> = {
  primary: '#fff' | 'white';
  secondary: '#000' | 'black';
  error: '#ff0000' | 'pink';
}

1 Answer 1

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Since Record<Intent, Color> is a named object type whose keys are statically known at compile time, you can have an interface extend it:

interface IntentColors extends Record<Intent, Color> {
  primary: '#fff' | 'white';
  secondary: '#000' | 'black';
  error: '#ff0000' | 'pink';
}

This is concise, and it will warn if you try to narrow one of the existing properties with a bad value type, like:

interface BadIntentColors extends Record<Intent, Color> { // error!
  primary: '#fff' | 'white';
  secondary: number;  // oops
  error: '#ff0000' | 'pink';
}

If you don't mention primary, secondary, or error in the declaration, they will stay string, because that's how interface extension works (interface Bar extends Foo {} means that Bar has the same properties as Foo). This could be a problem if you misspell a property, since the compiler will just add it as a new property, without warning:

interface UncaughtIntentColors extends Record<Intent, Color> {
  primairy: '#fff' | 'white';
  secondery: '#000' | 'black';
  erorr: '#ff0000' | 'pink';
} // no errors

It's up to you to decide whether the conciseness of interface extension is worth this possible stumbling point.


A different approach is to add a helper type alias you can use to verify your constraint:

type Extends<T, U extends T> = void;

The Extends type doesn't evaluate to anything interesting (it's always void), but if you write Extends<A, B> then there will be an error if B is not assignable to A.

So you can first define IntentColors without mentioning Record<Intent, Color>:

type IntentColors = {
  primary: '#fff' | 'white';
  secondary: '#000' | 'black';
  error: '#ff0000' | 'pink';
}

and then check it using Extends:

type TestIntentColors = Extends<Record<Intent, Color>, IntentColors>; // no error

If you make any kind of mistake:

type BadIntentColors = {
  primary: '#fff' | 'white';
  secondery: '#000' | 'black'; // oops
  error: '#ff0000' | 'pink';
}

It should be caught:

type TestBadIntentColors = Extends<Record<Intent, Color>, BadIntentColors>; // error!
// -----------------------------------------------------> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
//  Property 'secondary' is missing in type 'BadIntentColors' 
// but required in type 'Record<Intent, string>'.

This might be closer to the behavior you're looking for, but again it's up to you to decide if this behavior is worth the verbosity of adding a helper type alias and an separate "check" line of code.


Okay, hope one of those helps. Good luck!

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