2
function higherOrderFunction<P extends any[], R>(anyFunction: (...a: P) => R) {
  return (...args: P) => {
    anyFunction(...args); // anyFunction = lowerOrderFunction
  };
}

function lowerOrderFunction(name: string) {
  return '';
}

const higherOrderFunctionWithLowerOrderFunction = higherOrderFunction(lowerOrderFunction);
higherOrderFunctionWithLowerOrderFunction('x');

How to ensure anyFunction will have void type?

This must be for a generic function (generic means "any function" here) passed to higherOrderFunction, not just the example lowerOrderFunction above for which is enough to add :void

0

2 Answers 2

4

TypeScript doesn't want you to do this, see the FAQ. A function that returns a non-void value can be used wherever a void-returning function is needed. In TypeScript, a void return type means "you should not try to use the return value of this function" and not "this function really doesn't return a value". So the most conventional answer to this question is that you should not need to enforce such a restriction; if anyFunction returns a value, it will be ignored, which should be fine.


If you really want to bend the rules so that TypeScript will enforce the restriction, one thing you can do is this:

function higherOrderFunction<P extends any[]>(anyFunction: (...a: P) => undefined | void) {
  return (...args: P) => { anyFunction(...args); };
}

By specifying undefined | void you are saying you'll accept an undefined return value (which should be okay, right?) or otherwise a function that doesn't return (using void in a union seems to circumvent the compiler's "any value is fine" logic here):

higherOrderFunction(() => 1); // error, number is not undefined
higherOrderFunction(() => undefined); // okay
higherOrderFunction(() => console.log("this is void returning")); // okay

Or, if you want to make the compiler reject even undefined-returning functions, you could use a generic signature that infers return type and then makes things not work unless the type it infers is void:

function higherOrderFunction<P extends any[], R>(
  anyFunction: (...a: P) => R & (void extends R ? void : never)
) {
  return (...args: P) => { anyFunction(...args); };
}

The type (void extends R ? void : never) evaluates to void if R is void, and never otherwise. So you get this behavior:

higherOrderFunction(() => 1); // error, number is not never
higherOrderFunction(() => undefined); // error, undefined is not never
higherOrderFunction(() => console.log("this is void returning")); // okay

Those methods "work" in that they enforce the restriction for the example use case, but there are likely to be edge cases. The most obvious edge case is that the following code has nothing to do with higherOrderFunction and will not generate a warning:

const thisIsAllowed: () => void = () => 1; // okay

After all, non-void-returning functions are assignable to void-returning functions. And now the compiler sees thisIsAllowed as a void-returning function; it has forgotten all about the 1.

And so, no matter how higherOrderFunction() is defined so as to "require" a void return, there will be no error here:

higherOrderFunction(thisIsAllowed); // no error

That might be a deal-breaker for you, depending on your use case.


I think the best thing to do here is probably to embrace TypeScript's viewpoint that a void return type means "ignore any value returned" and not "no value is returned", and move on. Maybe the above rule-bending methods will still be of some use to you, but you shouldn't rely on them to prohibit functions that return values.


Okay, hope that helps; good luck!

Playground link

2
  • Very well put. It's worth noting that there is no such thing is a JavaScript function that does not return a value, which I think validates the "should not use" meaning Aug 17, 2020 at 2:53
  • I fully agree with you @jcalz. great explanation!
    – dragonmnl
    Aug 17, 2020 at 12:06
0

just change the return type of anyFunction passed on parameters

function higherOrderFunction<P extends any[], R>(anyFunction: (...a: P) => void) {
    return (...args: P) => {
      anyFunction(...args); // anyFunction = lowerOrderFunction
    };
  }
  
  function lowerOrderFunction(name: string) {
    return '';
  }
  
  const higherOrderFunctionWithLowerOrderFunction = higherOrderFunction(lowerOrderFunction);
  higherOrderFunctionWithLowerOrderFunction('x');
2
  • this won't prevent returning a non-void type from lowerOrderFunction (or any function passed to higherOrderFunction to that regard)
    – dragonmnl
    Aug 17, 2020 at 0:08
  • You cannot check this at run time if that is what you mean. The only thing you can do is not to use the returned value. Aug 17, 2020 at 0:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.