2

I'm using a library (Constate) which contains types that I'd like to improve upon. It maps an array of functions to a different array of functions. Both arrays of functions share the same return types.

I.e. with objects, I can do:

const obj = {
  a: arg => 123,
  b: arg => 'str',
};

type T = { [k in keyof typeof obj]: () => ReturnType<typeof obj[k]> }
/*
T is {
  a: () => number;
  b: () => string;
}
*/

With arrays, this doesn't work:

const arr = [
  arg => 123,
  arg => 'str',
] as const;

type t2 = { [k in keyof typeof arr]: () => ReturnType<typeof arr[k]> }
/*
Type 'readonly [(_: any) => number, (_: any) => string][k]' does not satisfy the constraint '(...args: any) => any'.
  Type '((_: any) => number) | ((_: any) => string) | 2 | (() => string) | (() => string) | { (...items: ConcatArray<((_: any) => number) | ((_: any) => string)>[]): (((_: any) => number) | ((_: any) => string))[]; (...items: (((_: any) => number) | ... 1 more ... | ConcatArray<...>)[]): (((_: any) => number) | ((_: any) =>...' is not assignable to type '(...args: any) => any'.
    Type '2' is not assignable to type '(...args: any) => any'.
*/

I'm assuming Type '2' in the error comes from .length.

Is there a way to get only the array indices and use it with an index signature?

3 Answers 3

2

TypeScript will map arrays/tuples to arrays/tuples as of TypeScript 3.1, but this only works when doing a homomorphic mapping of the form {[K in keyof T]: ...} where T is a type parameter, as mentioned in this comment in the issue @basarat linked, microsoft/TypeScript#27995. For now one way around this is to introduce indirection to turn your concrete type typeof arr into a type parameter:

type T2 = typeof arr extends infer A ? { [K in keyof A]: () => RT<A[K]> } : never;

Also note (as mentioned in microsoft/TypeScript#27351) that the compiler refuses to understand that you're mapping over just the numeric indices, and so it will not believe that A[K] will always be a function... and so ReturnType<A[K]> will give an error. My workaround here is to define my own ReturnType (called RT) which does not care if its argument is a function:

type RT<T> = T extends (...args: any) => infer R ? R : never;

Given those, the type T2 will evaluate to:

// type T2 = readonly [() => number, () => string]

which is presumably what you're trying to achieve here.

Hope that helps; good luck!

Playground link

1
  • That's really cool! Could you explain what typeof arr extends infer A is doing? I read the docs on infer a few times. In this case, is infer A basically getting the subset of A that doesn't include stuff in Array.prototype?
    – Leo Jiang
    Aug 17, 2020 at 7:05
2

short answer

To get the indices of a tuple, use:

type IdxOf<T> = { [idx in keyof T]: idx }[any]

instead of

keyof

because...

const arr = [(_arg: any) => 123, (_arg: any) => 'str'] as const

// the issue is that `keyof typeof arr` is not just  "0" | "1"
type keyofArr = keyof typeof arr
// keyofArr is "0" | "1" | "length" | "toString" | ...

// IdxOf<T> fixes this:
type IdxOfArr = IdxOf<typeof arr>
// IdxOfArr is "0" | "1"

type t2 = { [k in IdxOf<typeof arr>]: () => ReturnType<typeof arr[k]> }
// t2 is { 0: () => number; 1: () => string; }
1

The issues is that using mapped types over tuples lists over methods as well (More details on this issue).

Quick Fix

List the keys manually if you must:

const obj = {
  a: () => 123,
  b: () => 'str',
};

type TObj = { [Key in keyof typeof obj]: () => ReturnType<typeof obj[Key]> }
/*
TOjb is {
  a: () => number;
  b: () => string;
}
*/

const arr = [
  () => 123,
  () => 'str',
] as const;

// type Keys = keyof typeof arr; // Instead of 
type Keys = '0' | '1'; // Use names 

type TArr = { [Key in Keys]: () => ReturnType<typeof arr[Key]> }
/*
  All good
*/

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