67

I'm echoing some text in a bash script with a variable in it, and want to pad that variable so it will always have the appropriate ammount of spaces to the right to keep the rest of the text aligned.

Here's an example of what I want:

Echoing random number 1080    [ OK ]
Echoing random number 443     [ OK ]
Echoing random number 34842   [ OK ]

The numerical value would be of varying length (probably no longer than 5 or 6 digits).

I know that printf can do this and right align the variable by doing the following:

printf "Echoing random number %5s   [ OK ]" $RAND_NUM

However, this would format the text like this:

Echoing random number  1080   [ OK ]
Echoing random number   443   [ OK ]
Echoing random number 34842   [ OK ]

And of course just echoing with spaces doens't work:

echo "Echoing random number ${RAND_NUM}   [ OK ]"

Produces this:

Echoing random number 1080   [ OK ]
Echoing random number 443   [ OK ]
Echoing random number 34842   [ OK ]

Is there a way to print the text like my first example?

4 Answers 4

81

Use - to left align a field.

printf "Echoing random number %-5s   [ OK ]" $RAND_NUM

Alternatively, if you're on a Red Hat Linux system there are predefined functions that will print out green OK and red FAILED prompts (the ones you see during bootup):

#!/bin/bash

. /etc/init.d/functions

echo -n "Frobbing widget:"
frob_widget && echo_success || echo_failure
echo
2
  • 1
    Could you add links to definitions of these ok/failed functions in redhat?
    – user1472229
    Commented Jun 3, 2014 at 9:41
  • 4
    @user35186 See /lib/lsb/init-functions on your system, which is the modern cross-distro version of the script. If you have it, you can use log_success_msg, log_failure_msg, and log_warning_msg. Commented Jun 3, 2014 at 20:12
28

Collect all your lines in one var or text file then pipe it through column command. So this (my example file /tmp/columns.txt)

Echoing random number 1080 [ OK ]
Echoing random number 44332356 [ OK ]
Echoing random number 34842 [ OK ]
Echoing random number 342 [ OK ]

became this

Echoing  random  number  1080      [  OK  ]
Echoing  random  number  44332356  [  OK  ]
Echoing  random  number  34842     [  OK  ]
Echoing  random  number  342       [  OK  ]

Example command: cat /tmp/columns.txt | column -t

1
  • 4
    If you concat the strings with a deliminator (I use tilda (~)), you can then call column with the -s param to divide the columns on that character. E.g: echo "Echoing random number 1080~[ OK ]\nEchoing random number 1080~[ OK ]" | column -s'~' gives Echoing random number 1080 [ OK ] Commented Sep 24, 2019 at 13:12
6

Simple standard Bash function ($1: string to pad; $2: integer padding-length, positive for left-padding, negative for right-padding):

function pad () { [ "$#" -gt 1 ] && [ -n "$2" ] && printf "%$2.${2#-}s" "$1"; }

Usage examples:

$ echo "!$(pad "foobar" 9)!"
!   foobar!
$ echo "!$(pad "foobar" -9)!"
!foobar   !
$ echo "!$(pad "foobar" 3)!"
!foo!
2
  • 1
    Is function keyword required here?
    – pmor
    Commented Jul 3, 2023 at 12:25
  • @pmor no, you can omit function , bash function definition works just with: name_of_function () { echo "do something"; }. Do not forget the last ; in case of a one-liner.
    – Pierre
    Commented May 3 at 15:48
5

To expand on sobi3ch's answer: if you concat the strings with a deliminator (I use tilda (~)), you can then call column with the -s param to split the text at that point.

Apologies for the feline abuse:

foo.txt :

Echoing random number 1080~[ OK ]
Echoing random number 1080~[ OK ]
Echoing random number 1080~[ Failed ]

then :

cat foo.txt | column -s'~'

Echoing random number 1080        [ OK ]
Echoing random number 1080        [ OK ]
Echoing random number 1080        [ Failed ]
2
  • 2
    If you don't want to be accused of ailuromancy, then do this: column -s'~' < foo.txt Commented Jun 17, 2020 at 16:50
  • @JesseChisholm Is excessive use of cat verboten in bash script?
    – Lou
    Commented Dec 7, 2023 at 16:19

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