3

I've defined those two data structures as types:

typedef struct {
    float x,y,z;
} location3d;

typedef struct {
    location3d location;
    float radius; 
} particle3d;

My question is: can I create a constant location3d or a constant particle3d? I searched about constants but all I found is how to define constant integers or chars... etc.

8
  • 1
    typedef struct is c. Do you need to support c or are you able to use modern c++ – drescherjm Aug 17 '20 at 19:00
  • This should be of use: stackoverflow.com/q/388242/2079303 – eerorika Aug 17 '20 at 19:01
  • 1
    C or C++, choose one. Recommendations are likely to differ substantially depending on that choice. – John Bollinger Aug 17 '20 at 19:10
  • 1
    I'm using C, I put both of them in the tags expecting they will be similar. I'll edit the question. – moamen Aug 17 '20 at 19:15
  • 2
    c and c++ are different languages. As time goes on they drift further apart. – drescherjm Aug 17 '20 at 19:18
6

You use const with user-defined types exactly the same way as with built-in types. And as with other constants, you need to initialize it.

const particle3d my_particle = { {10.0, 21.5, 3}, 1.23};

You can also use designated initializers.

const particle3d my_particle = {.radius = 1.23, .location = {.x = 10.0, .y = 21.5, .z = 3}};
2
  • Do you know if the internal initialization does this based on where the members are declared. Like in order of the class initialization? I feel like this is a horrible way, as the class gets adjusted with new members, etc. then developers would add these members in various areas, and could mess up the initialization this way. Feel like a created constructor is safer and more readable of what is being passed in etc. – Omid CompSCI Aug 17 '20 at 19:08
  • 2
    Yes, you can use designated initializers, just like non-const structures. – Barmar Aug 17 '20 at 19:13
5

You can use const the same way as with the built-in types.

Have a look at the following implementation:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    float x,y,z;
} location3d;

typedef struct {
    location3d location;
    float radius; 
} particle3d;

int main(){

    const particle3d particle = {{1, 2, 3}, 8.9};
    
    printf("%f %f %f\n", particle.location.x, particle.location.y, particle.location.z);

    printf("%f\n", particle.radius);
    
    return 0;
}

Output:

1.000000 2.000000 3.000000
8.900000

PS: Author recently removed the C++ tag. Removed C++ code and shifted to C.

0

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