198

How can I get the date of next Tuesday?

In PHP, it's as simple as strtotime('next tuesday');.

How can I achieve something similar in .NET

5
  • 15
    ASP.NET is a set of web technologies. C# is a language. You really need to think of this in terms of plain .NET. Now, for "next Tuesday" - is that "the first Tuesday after today"? If it were Monday and someone said "see you next Tuesday" I'd expect that to mean 8 days time rather than 1. What about if today is a Tuesday? What time of day do you need?
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:35
  • If today is tuesday, you want to find the date when is next tuesday? Or today is monday, you want to find the 2nd tuesday from monday?
    – FIre Panda
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:35
  • The closest tuesday going forward to which ever particular day it is.
    – brenjt
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:37
  • 2
    @brenjtL: And if it's already Tuesday?
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:38
  • If already Tuesday then that same day
    – brenjt
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:39

11 Answers 11

469

As I've mentioned in the comments, there are various things you could mean by "next Tuesday", but this code gives you "the next Tuesday to occur, or today if it's already Tuesday":

DateTime today = DateTime.Today;
// The (... + 7) % 7 ensures we end up with a value in the range [0, 6]
int daysUntilTuesday = ((int) DayOfWeek.Tuesday - (int) today.DayOfWeek + 7) % 7;
DateTime nextTuesday = today.AddDays(daysUntilTuesday);

If you want to give "a week's time" if it's already Tuesday, you can use:

// This finds the next Monday (or today if it's Monday) and then adds a day... so the
// result is in the range [1-7]
int daysUntilTuesday = (((int) DayOfWeek.Monday - (int) today.DayOfWeek + 7) % 7) + 1;

... or you could use the original formula, but from tomorrow:

DateTime tomorrow = DateTime.Today.AddDays(1);
// The (... + 7) % 7 ensures we end up with a value in the range [0, 6]
int daysUntilTuesday = ((int) DayOfWeek.Tuesday - (int) tomorrow.DayOfWeek + 7) % 7;
DateTime nextTuesday = tomorrow.AddDays(daysUntilTuesday);

EDIT: Just to make this nice and versatile:

public static DateTime GetNextWeekday(DateTime start, DayOfWeek day)
{
    // The (... + 7) % 7 ensures we end up with a value in the range [0, 6]
    int daysToAdd = ((int) day - (int) start.DayOfWeek + 7) % 7;
    return start.AddDays(daysToAdd);
}

So to get the value for "today or in the next 6 days":

DateTime nextTuesday = GetNextWeekday(DateTime.Today, DayOfWeek.Tuesday);

To get the value for "the next Tuesday excluding today":

DateTime nextTuesday = GetNextWeekday(DateTime.Today.AddDays(1), DayOfWeek.Tuesday);
8
  • Wow, I was just wondering on how I could get nth days til the next tuesday and you then updated your answer with an example Nice. Thanks
    – brenjt
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:43
  • It was hard to choose the correct answer. But yours seems to be the most versatile and you made it easy to understand. Thanks for you help.
    – brenjt
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:46
  • 1
    @brenjt: Actually I'd say that Sven's is more versatile, as you can specify the day of week, but it's your call :) (I've now edited mine to give a more generalized version.)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:48
  • 2
    The +7)%7 solution is pretty nice though. Although the reason I didn't use that is because it's a bit of a micro-optimization and too easy to get wrong (as well as sacrificing some readability), imho of course.
    – Sven
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:52
  • A unit test: [TestMethod] public void ShouldGetNextSaturday() { var now = DateTime.Now; var test = GetNextWeekday(DateTime.Today, DayOfWeek.Saturday); Assert.IsTrue(now.Day < test.Day, "The expected month day is not here."); Assert.IsTrue(test.DayOfWeek == DayOfWeek.Saturday, "The expected week day is not here."); Assert.IsTrue((test.Day - now.Day) < 7, "The expected day interval is not here."); }
    – rasx
    Commented Jan 11, 2012 at 0:54
82

This should do the trick:

static DateTime GetNextWeekday(DayOfWeek day)
{
    DateTime result = DateTime.Now.AddDays(1);
    while( result.DayOfWeek != day )
        result = result.AddDays(1);
    return result;
}
2
  • Great response, if today is Tuesday (which it is ha) will this return today or the next tuesday?
    – brenjt
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:42
  • 4
    This will return the next Tuesday. If you want it to return today, just remove the .AddDays(1) from the first line, that way it will also check DateTime.Now itself.
    – Sven
    Commented Jun 14, 2011 at 15:45
9

There are less verbose and more clever/elegant solutions to this problem, but the following C# function works really well for a number of situations.

/// <summary>
/// Find the closest weekday to the given date
/// </summary>
/// <param name="includeStartDate">if the supplied date is on the specified day of the week, return that date or continue to the next date</param>
/// <param name="searchForward">search forward or backward from the supplied date. if a null parameter is given, the closest weekday (ie in either direction) is returned</param>
public static DateTime ClosestWeekDay(this DateTime date, DayOfWeek weekday, bool includeStartDate = true, bool? searchForward=true)
{
    if (!searchForward.HasValue && !includeStartDate) 
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("if searching in both directions, start date must be a valid result");
    }
    var day = date.DayOfWeek;
    int add = ((int)weekday - (int)day);
    if (searchForward.HasValue)
    {
        if (add < 0 && searchForward.Value)
        {
            add += 7;
        }
        else if (add > 0 && !searchForward.Value)
        {
            add -= 7;
        }
        else if (add == 0 && !includeStartDate)
        {
            add = searchForward.Value ? 7 : -7;
        }
    }
    else if (add < -3) 
    {
        add += 7; 
    }
    else if (add > 3)
    {
        add -= 7;
    }
    return date.AddDays(add);
}
1
  • 1
    The only answer that implements as extension to DateTime. While the other solutions all work, having it as an extension method produces the easiest to use code. Commented Nov 6, 2018 at 16:13
7

@Jon Skeet good answer.

For previous Day:

private DateTime GetPrevWeekday(DateTime start, DayOfWeek day) {
    // The (... - 7) % 7 ensures we end up with a value in the range [0, 6]
    int daysToRemove = ((int) day - (int) start.DayOfWeek - 7) % 7;
    return start.AddDays(daysToRemove);
}

Thanks!!

1
  • 3
    Note that this solution involves negative numbers handed to the modulo operator. The Wikipedia article about the modulo operator says that "When either a or n is negative, the naive definition breaks down and programming languages differ in how these values are defined." While this probably works in C#, a mathematically more 'solid' solution to get the same result would be to swap the DayOfWeek values like this: int daysToSubtract = -(((int)dateTime.DayOfWeek - (int)day + 7) % 7);
    – Andre
    Commented May 9, 2016 at 9:35
6
DateTime nextTuesday = DateTime.Today.AddDays(((int)DateTime.Today.DayOfWeek - (int)DayOfWeek.Tuesday) + 7);
1
  • If today is Monday, the answer that you provided would yield a week from Tuesday, rather than tomorrow.
    – Tony
    Commented Nov 1, 2014 at 6:40
5

Very simple sample to include or exclude current date, you specify the date and the day the week you are interested in.

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the next date.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="date">The date to inspected.</param>
    /// <param name="dayOfWeek">The day of week you want to get.</param>
    /// <param name="exclDate">if set to <c>true</c> the current date will be excluded and include next occurrence.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static DateTime GetNextDate(this DateTime date, DayOfWeek dayOfWeek, bool exclDate = true)
    {
        //note: first we need to check if the date wants to move back by date - Today, + diff might move it forward or backwards to Today
        //eg: date - Today = 0 - 1 = -1, so have to move it forward
        var diff = dayOfWeek - date.DayOfWeek;
        var ddiff = date.Date.Subtract(DateTime.Today).Days + diff;

        //note: ddiff < 0 : date calculates to past, so move forward, even if the date is really old, it will just move 7 days from date passed in
        //note: ddiff >= (exclDate ? 6 : 7) && diff < 0 : date is into the future, so calculated future weekday, based on date
        if (ddiff < 0 || ddiff >= (exclDate ? 6 : 7) && diff < 0)
            diff += 7; 

        //note: now we can get safe values between 0 - 6, especially if past dates is being used
        diff = diff % 7;

        //note: if diff is 0 and we are excluding the date passed, we will add 7 days, eg: 1 week
        diff += diff == 0 & exclDate ? 7 : 0;

        return date.AddDays(diff);
    }
}

some test cases

[TestMethod]
    public void TestNextDate()
    {
        var date = new DateTime(2013, 7, 15);
        var start = date;
        //testing same month - forwardOnly
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Tuesday)); //16
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Wednesday)); //17
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Thursday)); //18
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Friday)); //19
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Saturday)); //20
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Sunday)); //21
        Assert.AreEqual(start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Monday)); //22

        //testing same month - include date
        Assert.AreEqual(start = date, date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Monday, false)); //15
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Tuesday, false)); //16
        Assert.AreEqual(start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Wednesday, false)); //17

        //testing month change - forwardOnly
        date = new DateTime(2013, 7, 29);
        start = date;
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Tuesday)); //30
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Wednesday)); //31
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Thursday)); //2013/09/01-month increased
        Assert.AreEqual(start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Friday)); //02

        //testing year change
        date = new DateTime(2013, 12, 30);
        start = date;
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Tuesday)); //31
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Wednesday)); //2014/01/01 - year increased
        Assert.AreEqual(start = start.AddDays(1), date.GetNextDate(DayOfWeek.Thursday)); //02
    }
1
  • 2
    I have made additional changes from the original answer after some extensive testing. This will now safely calculate the next day based on the date used, past, present and future. All the previous examples where great, but failed under certain conditions. I did not make it a one-liner statement, so that additional comments could be made to what the calculations are doing. The positive case by Jon Skeet was great, although the case I had was to move 1 day back from a date, but still greater than Today, and what if it moves to today or to yesterday ... this solved it.
    – AJB
    Commented Mar 13, 2019 at 14:44
4
DateTime nexttuesday=DateTime.Today.AddDays(1);

while(nexttuesday.DayOfWeek!=DayOfWeek.Tuesday)
   nexttuesday = nexttuesday.AddDays(1);
0
3

Now in oneliner flavor - in case you need to pass it as parameter into some mechanism.

DateTime.Now.AddDays(((int)yourDate.DayOfWeek - (int)DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek + 7) % 7).Day

In this specific case:

DateTime.Now.AddDays(((int)DayOfWeek.Tuesday - (int)DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek + 7) % 7).Day
2

It could be an extension also, it all depends

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<DateTime> Next(this DateTime date, DayOfWeek day)
    {
        // This loop feels expensive and useless, but the point is IEnumerable
        while(true)
        {
            if (date.DayOfWeek == day)
            {
                yield return date;
            }
            date = date.AddDays(1);
        }
    }
}

Usage

    var today = DateTime.Today;
    foreach(var monday in today.Next(DayOfWeek.Monday))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(monday);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
1
  • A yield return in a loop without an exit clause seems a little risky.
    – stritch000
    Commented Jul 15, 2021 at 0:32
0

I want to get next day from this time include today also I want it to be at 12:00 AM

  public static DateTime GetNextWeekday(DateTime start, DayOfWeek day , bool includetoday = false) {
        if (includetoday && start.DayOfWeek == day) return start.Date;
        int daysToAdd = ((int)day - (int)start.DayOfWeek + 7) % 7;
        return start.Date.AddDays(daysToAdd);
    }
5
  • 1
    But this would also return the same day even if includeToday = false
    – lukger
    Commented Jan 31, 2023 at 8:40
  • i use this code in my app... for sure ... u can check last line and if date was the same add 7 days more Commented Jan 31, 2023 at 14:20
  • 1
    Yes but this makes the first line if (includetoday && ... obsolete
    – lukger
    Commented Feb 1, 2023 at 7:51
  • if it is Monday and u want next Monday includetoday should be false ... if it is Monday and u want nearest Monday includetoday should be true ... like now it is 2:00 Am And want to get 9:00 Am in next Monday ( Today ) Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 18:04
  • there is should be check of Clock too .. if time was pass .. add 7 day more ... and this can be added in first line Commented Feb 2, 2023 at 18:12
-6

Objective C Version:

+(NSInteger) daysUntilNextWeekday: (NSDate*)startDate withTargetWeekday: (NSInteger) targetWeekday
{
    NSInteger startWeekday = [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] component:NSCalendarUnitWeekday fromDate:startDate];
    return (targetWeekday - startWeekday + 7) % 7;
}
1
  • 6
    Cool answer, but the original question asked about .NET.
    – Adam Davis
    Commented Nov 15, 2017 at 17:19

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