0
const btn = document.querySelector('button')
let x = 0

const load = ()=>{
    btn.addEventListener('click',()=>{
        console.log(x++)
        load()
    })
}
load()

first click : 0
second click : 1, 2
third click: 3, 4, 5, 6
fourth click : 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

Please help how to make my output into this:
first click : 0
second click : 1
third click : 2
fourth click: 3

2
  • 3
    Cause you add one more listener each time when you call load – Darth Aug 18 '20 at 9:50
  • 1
    load registers an event handler, which calls load, which registers an event handler, which calls load, which registers .... – Felix Kling Aug 18 '20 at 9:51
1

Inside your event listener, you are invoking the load function, which registers the listener again. First time, you have 1 listener. When you press the button, your listener increases x and logs it, and invokes load which registers the listener for a second time. Next time you press the button, ...

2
  • Thank you but why does it happens? is there any way I can make it work? – Cathy Aug 18 '20 at 9:58
  • 1
    Don't invoke the load function within the listener (i.e., remove load() after the console.log(...) statement). – Tom Aug 18 '20 at 10:02
2

load registers an event handler. If the event handler calls load again it will add yet another event handler, etc.

Just don't call load inside the event handler. There isn't even a reason to define load at all:

const btn = document.querySelector('button');
let x = 0;

btn.addEventListener('click',() => {
  console.log(x++)
});
2
  • but I want it that way, is there no way I can make it work aside from your code? – Cathy Aug 18 '20 at 9:57
  • 1
    You can have keep the load function if you want to. Just don't call it again inside the event handler. – Felix Kling Aug 18 '20 at 10:02

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