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Tomcat only implements the web container of the Java Enterprise Edition architecture. In contrast, e.g. GlassFish implements a full Java EE stack. This has been discussed a lot on stackoverflow.

However, for a Java EE beginner like me it is hard to imagine what cannot be done with Tomcat. Could you please give some short examples?

3 Answers 3

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From the Apache tomcat documentation:

Is tomcat an EJB server? Can I use EJBs with tomcat?

Tomcat is not an EJB server. Tomcat is not a full J2EE server. Tomcat is a Servlet container. Tomcat does support those parts of the J2EE specification that are required for Servlets, such as a subset of JNDI functionality. Furthermore, you can connect to remote J2EE servers, or run tomcat embedded inside a full J2EE server.

Some of the differences this implies is...

  • Tomcat can only handle WARs, not EARs
  • Tomcat does not support any types of EJBs (like Session Beans, MDBs, Timers, etc.)
  • Tomcat has no JPA support
  • Tomcat has limited JNDI functionality (not sure of the details here)

Tomcat can be used inside of an J2EE conatiner to use as the web conatiner.

Tomcat is much lighter-weight regarding resources and file system foot prints.

If you need J2EE functionality, my suggestion would be to bite the bullet and use Glassfish despite the complexity and resource requirements (compared to tomcat, Glassfish is quite easy to use compared to others like Weblogic, and JBoss). If not, stick with tomcat, it will keep things simple and fast for you. Either way, it isn't hard to switch your project packaging later and swap out containers.

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  • I am trying to understand why tomcat is not an EE container but I am a bit confused. @Jesse Webb You say in your answer that tomcat has no JPA support. Does this means that JPA cannot be used at all with tomcat? because I am pretty sure that in one of my Web Applications deployed in tomcat 6 I have implemented and used JPA2.0 successfully. Thanks
    – NikosDim
    Oct 27, 2014 at 23:29
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    @NikosDim Tomcat does not come with built-in JPA support. This example of using EclipseLink for JPA in Tomcat summarizes it nicely: "Tomcat 6 is not a Java EE 5 compliant server by design as it is a servlet container, however the servlet container is able to run EJB 3.0/JPA applications in application-managed Java SE (stand alone) mode." Basically, you can get it working but it involves a custom deploy in which you put the Java EE libraries on your Tomcat server.
    – Jesse Webb
    Oct 28, 2014 at 3:22
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There are a large number of technologies/capabilities that are part of Java EE. Some of them are available as part of the Tomcat download, others can be added to a Tomcat based environment and some cannot be added to a Tomcat environment.

Deploy an EJB jar onto Tomcat: No.

Call Remote methods of an EJB running in an EJB container: Yes.

Deploy a RAR onto Tomcat: No.

Deploy an EAR onto Tomcat: No.

Deploy an Application Client jar onto Tomcat: No.

Cobble together a way to host a Java Web Startable app that calls Remote methods of an EJB running in an EJB container: Yes

Use JSF as the framework for your app: Yes, but you need to package an implementation in your app or install it onto your server.

Create a program that leverages JSR-88 to manage deployment of war files onto Tomcat: No... not that this is a huge loss.

Use JSR-77 MEJBs to manage your Tomcat server: No... another not huge loss.

Create web apps that provide SOAP web services: Yes... but you will need to get the tools and libraries as part of a separate download and integrate them with your workflow, application and server runtime yourself.

Create web apps that use JPA: Yes... but you will need to the tools and libraries as part of a separate download and integrate them with your workflow, application and server runtime yourself.

Create web apps that use CDI: Yes... but you will need to the tools and libraries as part of a separate download and integrate them with your workflow, application and server runtime yourself.

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EJBs - Stateless Session Beans, Stateful Session beans Message driven beans EJB Timers JPA (EJB3.0)

This is a very basic list. there are many more features that Tomcat doesn't have.

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