4

Say I have an array that looks like this:

$array = ['xl', 's', '1', '10', '3', 'xs', 'm', '3T', 'xxl', 'xxs', 'one size'];

I want to sort the array to look like this:

$sortedArray = ['1', '3', '3T', '10', 'one size', 'xxs', 'xs', 's', 'm', 'xl', 'xxl'];

How could I possibly sort this array in javascript?

I can spot a pattern so that helps me get on the right track, but I can't figure out the sort function. A pattern being all sizes that start with a number are first, ordered numerically (but not sure how '3T' handles that). And then we show 'one size', and then we sort the rest (XXS, XS, S, M, L, XL, XXL) based on a predefined order.

3
  • can there be more things in the array than "things that are numbers or start with numbers", "one size" and the normal sizes? like how general does this need to be? why is "one size" where it is?
    – bryan60
    Aug 19, 2020 at 16:25
  • first number (eventually with char after it), than one size, xxs -xxl. Is this right?
    – Sascha
    Aug 19, 2020 at 16:27
  • you can have a look here, for example. Aug 19, 2020 at 16:32

5 Answers 5

4

Using sort with userdefined sort algorithm: I parse both both to compare to an Int. Than I look if only one of them is a number than this is before. If both are numbers than I look if both are equal. If so than I take the rest from the string (which is not part of the Int) and compare them alphabetically. Otherwise I compare both Integers.
If none of abouve cases is true than I have my ORDER-array with the confection sizes and I sort for the indexOf this. If there are missing any, you can easily add them.

Extended: Because the sizes are sometimes xxl or XXL I convert them for sorting to lowercases so they are sorted as desired.

Extended 2: Because 2XL would be sorted to the beginning to the numbers I make another trick: After parsing to integer I look if the string is one out of the ORDER-array. If so I set the parsed integer to NaN like there stnds a string. By this the comparison for the keywords takes place for this entry.

Extended 3: Sorting of 0 was false, I added it to the begin (like OP's proposal).

array = ['XL', 's', '1', '10', '2xl', '3', '0', 'xs', 'm', '3T', 'xxl', 'xxs', 'one size'];
const ORDER = ['one size', 'xxs', 'xs', 's', 'm', 'xl', '2xl', 'xxl'];

array.sort((a,b) => {
    a = a.toLowerCase();
    b = b.toLowerCase();
    
    let nra = parseInt(a);
    let nrb = parseInt(b);
    
    if ((ORDER.indexOf(a)!=-1)) nra = NaN;
    if ((ORDER.indexOf(b)!=-1)) nrb = NaN;
  
    if (nrb===0) return 1;
    if (nra&&!nrb || nra===0) return -1;
    if (!nra&&nrb) return 1;
    if (nra && nrb) {
        if (nra==nrb) {
            return (a.substr((''+nra).length)).localeCompare((a.substr((''+nra).length)));
        } else {
            return nra-nrb;
        }
    } else {
        return ORDER.indexOf(a) - ORDER.indexOf(b);
    }
});

console.log(array);

9
  • This looks promising. Is there any way to ignore case? Your lowercase array it's sorting correctly, but something like XL, XXL, etc does not. It shouldn't be case sensitive.
    – Corey
    Aug 19, 2020 at 17:33
  • Also, if there is any way to add something like 4XL to the ORDER array, and have the original numerical sort disregard any sizes in the ORDER array, that would be great. That way a size like '4XL' would appear at the end.
    – Corey
    Aug 19, 2020 at 17:39
  • I was faster than you told me: I began with the second just after I posted my first solution, It was a little tricky, the first with upper/lowercases was easy.
    – Sascha
    Aug 19, 2020 at 17:55
  • thanks, I will keep an eye out for the updated answer.
    – Corey
    Aug 19, 2020 at 17:58
  • 1
    I added it to the code. By the way, for customer it's probably intuitiver if you use toUpperCase and change the ORDER-array because if there is be added anything later it's more likely to use XXXXL than xxxxl. Best way would be to use const ORDER = ['xxl', ..].map(el => el.toUpperCase());, so both is possible.
    – Sascha
    Aug 19, 2020 at 19:05
2

You can define the weights of each size, and then sort according to it:

let array = ['xl', 's', '1', '10', '3', 'xs', 'm', '3T', 'xxl', 'xxs', 'one size'];
let weights = {
  '1':1, 
  '3':2, 
  '3T':3, 
  '10':4, 
  'one size':5, 
  'xxs':6, 
  'xs':7, 
  's':8, 
  'm':9, 
  'xl':10, 
  'xxl':11
};
let sortedArray = array.sort((a,b)=>weights[a]-weights[b]);
console.log(sortedArray)

Another way to think about this, would be comparing the values normally if both are numeric, and rely on weights comparison otherwise:

let array = ['xl', 's', '1', '10', '3', 'xs', 'm', '3T', 'xxl', 'xxs', 'one size'];
let weights = {
  '1':1, 
  '3':2, 
  '3T':3, 
  '10':4, 
  'one size':5, 
  'xxs':6, 
  'xs':7, 
  's':8, 
  'm':9, 
  'xl':10, 
  'xxl':11
};
let sortedArray = array.sort((a,b)=>{
     if(typeof(a)=="number" && typeof(b)=="number")
          return a-b;
     else
          return weights[a]-weights[b]
});
console.log(sortedArray)

10
  • 1
    This is definitely the easiest approach, compared to a real sort function which, while not that hard, is significantly harder than this. Aug 19, 2020 at 16:29
  • This seems right, except that it sounds like there can be arbitrary numeric values that should just be sorted numerically, rather than having to be listed specifically in weights.
    – Barmar
    Aug 19, 2020 at 16:30
  • @Barmar does this mean that the first comparison should be on the values if both are numeric, and then on the weights otherwise? Aug 19, 2020 at 16:32
  • 1
    You may also have to handle numeric-vs-nonnumeric first.
    – Barmar
    Aug 19, 2020 at 16:34
  • 1
    You can try using this: stackoverflow.com/a/54110617/7486313 . And take a look at this library if you're using npm: npmjs.com/package/apparel-sorter Aug 19, 2020 at 16:58
2

I would avoid predefined weights and orders, and simply set s = -1; m = 0; l = 1 and let preceeding xes be multipliers. Additionally, sort numbers before strings, as there's no point in mixing different grading systems.

function sortArrayOfGradings(array) {
    function parseGradingOrder(grading) {
        let order;
        if (grading.includes('s'))
            order = -1;
        else if (grading.includes('m'))
            order = 0;
        else if (grading.includes('l'))
            order = 1;
        const n = Number(grading.match(/\d+(?!X)/))
        const numXes = grading.match(/x*/)[0].length
        const mul = n ? n : numXes + 1
        return order * mul;
    }
    return array.sort((a, b) => {
        if (!isNaN(a) && !isNaN(b))
              return a-b;
        if (!isNaN(a) && isNaN(b))
            return -1
        if (isNaN(a) && !isNaN(b))
            return 1
        if (isNaN(a) && isNaN(b)) {
            let aOrder = parseGradingOrder(a.toLowerCase());
            let bOrder = parseGradingOrder(b.toLowerCase());
            return aOrder-bOrder;
        }
    });
}

Then you could sort any thing like 'XXXl' and '2xl' together (not case sensitive):

sortArrayOfGradings(['xxxxl', '2xl', 'l'])
// returns ['l', '2xl', 'xxxxl']

And:

sortArrayOfGradings(['xxxxl', '5xl', 'l'])
// returns ['l', 'xxxxl', '5xl']

But you could also throw numbers in there:

sortArrayOfGradings([2, 2, 1, 4, 'XL', '2xl', 'xs'])
// returns [1, 2, 2, 4, 'xs', 'XL', '2xl']
0

Well. Let us have an HTML-elements with text inside. Like this:

<div class="sizes">
    <div class="size">
        <label for="size-s">S</label>
        <input type="radio" name="size" value="s" id="size-s">
    </div>
    <div class="size">
        <label for="size-xl">XL</label>
        <input type="radio" name="size" value="xl" id="size-xl">
    </div>
    <div class="size">
        <label for="size-3xl">3XL</label>
        <input type="radio" name="size" value="3xl" id="size-3xl">
    </div>
<div>

First of all - prepare common variables and constants;

  const sizesBlock = document.querySelector('.sizes');
  const sizes = sizesBlock.querySelectorAll('.size');
  const sizesMap = new Map();
  const order = [
    '2xs',
    'xxs',
    'xs',
    's',
    'm',
    'l',
    'xl',
    '2xl',
    'xxl',
    '3xl',
    'xxxl', 
    '4xl',
    'xxxxl',
    'os'
  ];
  const sizesArraySorted = [];

We need to fill the "sizesArraySorted" with "null"s, it will help us in the future...

  while(order.length > sizesArraySorted.length) {
    sizesArraySorted[sizesArraySorted.length] = null;
  }

Fill "sizesMap":

    sizes.forEach(size => {
      if (size  && typeof size !== 'undefined') {
      let sizeName = size.querySelector('label').innerText;
        if (sizeName) {
          sizesMap.set(sizeName, size);
        }
      }
    });

Arrange elements from "sizesMap" by positions from "order" and fill "sizesArraySorted":

    for (let pair of sizesMap.entries()) {
      let key = pair[0].toLowerCase();
      let element = pair[1];
      let position = order.indexOf(key);
      if (position > -1) {
        sizesArraySorted.splice(position, 0, element);
      }
    }

And refresh HTML block with elements:

    sizesBlock.innerHTML = '';
    sizesArraySorted.forEach(element => {
      if (element) {
        // console.log(element);
        sizesBlock.appendChild(element);
      }
    });

Full JS:

{
  const sizesBlock = document.querySelector('.sizes');
  const sizes = sizesBlock.querySelectorAll('.size');
  const sizesMap = new Map();
  const order = [
    '2xs',
    'xxs',
    'xs',
    's',
    'm',
    'l',
    'xl',
    '2xl',
    'xxl',
    '3xl',
    'xxxl', 
    '4xl',
    'xxxxl',
    'os'
  ];
  const sizesArraySorted = [];
  while(order.length > sizesArraySorted.length) {
    sizesArraySorted[sizesArraySorted.length] = null;
  }

  if (sizes && sizesBlock) {
    sizes.forEach(size => {
      if (size  && typeof size !== 'undefined') {
      let sizeName = size.querySelector('label').innerText;
        if (sizeName) {
          sizesMap.set(sizeName, size);
        }
      }
    });

    for (let pair of sizesMap.entries()) {
      let key = pair[0].toLowerCase();
      let element = pair[1];
      let position = order.indexOf(key);
      if (position > -1) {
        sizesArraySorted.splice(position, 0, element);
      }
    }
  
    sizesBlock.innerHTML = '';
    sizesArraySorted.forEach(element => {
      if (element) {
        // console.log(element);
        sizesBlock.appendChild(element);
      }
    });
  }
}
-2

The short answer is: you don't.

I am assuming that what you really want to do is to be able to sort other things based on their size, where the order is determined by some (as far as Javascript is concerned, arbitrary) ordering specified by a list. So you would do just that: write a sort routine that would compare items by their size's relative position in that list.

Or just look at @MajedBadawi's answer.

12
  • Seems to me like wanting this in a sorted order makes perfect sense, e.g., presenting them in a logical order in a drop-down list. Aug 19, 2020 at 16:28
  • 1
    It also seems like the sorted version of this list is what he would use to sort other things that refer to it.
    – Barmar
    Aug 19, 2020 at 16:28
  • I think it's a mix of an actual sort and an arbitrary sort. ie, things that are numbers or start with numbers get sorted logically, everything else comes after and is in an arbitrary order
    – bryan60
    Aug 19, 2020 at 16:29
  • 2
    is it though? becasue @MajedBadawi's answer probably isn't robust enough as you can't or don't want to try and weight every numerical item. to me, this problem is dividing the array into two groups, one that can be sorted logically and one arbitrary, then sorting them separately, and then putting them back together.
    – bryan60
    Aug 19, 2020 at 16:31
  • 1
    @DaveNewton I'm reading between the lines a little on the question. I think OP wants something that can handle anything numeric (or semi numeric) plus an arbitrary sort, even though they aren't saying so explicity... i could be wrong
    – bryan60
    Aug 19, 2020 at 16:35

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