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My editor (TextMate) shows id in another colour (when used as variable name) than my usual variable names. Is it a keyword? I don't want to shade any keyword...

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4 Answers 4

104

id is not a keyword in Python, but it is the name of a built-in function.

The keywords are:

and       del       from      not       while
as        elif      global    or        with
assert    else      if        pass      yield
break     except    import    print
class     exec      in        raise
continue  finally   is        return
def       for       lambda    try

Keywords are invalid variable names. The following would be a syntax error:

if = 1

On the other hand, built-in functions like id or type or str can be shadowed:

str = "hello"    # don't do this
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  • 1
    Thanks for the quick reply. I assume using id as an attribute in a class is same as bad? myobject = myclass(); myobject.id = 123; Would this shade the built-in function, too?
    – Aufwind
    Jun 14, 2011 at 22:27
  • 9
    @Aufwind: Using id as a class attribute is not as bad, because in Python you always have to qualify it with something (this.id or foo.id), so it always follows a .. Your editor may not understand this distinction. Jun 14, 2011 at 22:30
  • 2
    I couldn't come up with a synonyme that is as short as id. Good to hear, that, as an attribute, it has no sideeffects. :-)
    – Aufwind
    Jun 14, 2011 at 22:33
  • 5
    I'm utterly guilty of using id even as a local variable sometimes. It's so easy not to care when it's so rarely needed... Jun 14, 2011 at 22:37
  • @Aufwind: in case of models, pk is a good substitute for id Jun 1, 2021 at 12:20
23

You can also get help from python:

>>> help(id)
Help on built-in function id in module __builtin__:

id(...)
    id(object) -> integer

    Return the identity of an object.  This is guaranteed to be unique among
    simultaneously existing objects.  (Hint: it's the object's memory address.)

or alternatively you can question IPython

IPython 0.10.2   [on Py 2.6.6]
[C:/]|1> id??
Type:           builtin_function_or_method
Base Class:     <type 'builtin_function_or_method'>
String Form:    <built-in function id>
Namespace:      Python builtin
Docstring [source file open failed]:
    id(object) -> integer

Return the identity of an object.  This is guaranteed to be unique among
simultaneously existing objects.  (Hint: it's the object's memory address.)
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  • Thanks, I simply forgot about (the powerful) docu in python. :-)
    – Aufwind
    Jun 14, 2011 at 22:36
  • Can I use help(somecommand) everytime I am not sure, if somecommand could be a keyword or a python built-in function to be sure?
    – Aufwind
    Jun 16, 2011 at 18:01
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    @Aufwind yes, you can. For keywords you must, however, use a string for example for the if statement you must do help('if').
    – joaquin
    Jun 16, 2011 at 22:31
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Just for reference purposes:

Check if something is a keyword in Python:

>>> import keyword  
>>> keyword.iskeyword('id')
False

Check all the keywords in Python:

>>> keyword.kwlist
['and', 'as', 'assert', 'break', 'class', 'continue', 'def', 'del', 'elif',
 'else', 'except', 'exec', 'finally', 'for', 'from', 'global', 'if', 'import',
 'in', 'is', 'lambda', 'not', 'or', 'pass', 'print', 'raise', 'return', 'try',
 'while', 'with', 'yield']
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It's a built in function:

id(...)
    id(object) -> integer

    Return the identity of an object.  This is guaranteed to be unique among
    simultaneously existing objects.  (Hint: it's the object's memory address.)

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