Here is a interesting java question.

the following simple java program contains static field initialized by a method statically. Actually, I force the method which calculate the intiailize value to raise a NullPointException, When I access such a static field, a NoClassDefFoundError will raised. it seems the VM treat the Class is not complete.

But when I access the Class, it still available;

Does anyone knows why?

class TestClass {
    public static TestClass instance = init();

    public static TestClass init() {
       String a = null;
       a.charAt(0); //force a null point exception;
       return new TestClass();
    }
}

class MainClass {
    static public void main(String[] args) {
       accessStatic(); // a ExceptionInInitializerError raised cause by NullPointer
       accessStatic(); //now a NoClassDefFoundError occurs;

       // But the class of TestClass is still available; why?
       System.out.println("TestClass.class=" + TestClass.class);
    }

    static void accessStatic() {
        TestClass a;

        try {
            a = TestClass.instance; 
        } catch(Throwable e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }   
}
  • This is surprising to me, too! I pinged a friend of mine who might know the answer; we'll see if he replies. – Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 15 '11 at 2:45
  • I think because the class loader fails to load the TestClass because of the exception in the static initializer – Arun P Johny Jun 15 '11 at 2:57
  • @Arun: that part is trivial; I don't think he's even asking about that. The surprising part is the third printout which shows that TestClass.class in MainClass actually holds a reference to a physical Class object. If the class isn't properly initialized, why are we allowed to touch it at all? – Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 15 '11 at 3:02
  • 1
    @Ernest TestClass.class doesn't seem to trigger class loading and looks like it's accessible/available immaterial of whether or not the class has been loaded. – Bala R Jun 15 '11 at 3:07

The answer to such questions is usually buried somewhere in the specs... (§12.4.2)

What happens when classes are initialized:

Steps 1-4 are somewhat unrelated to this question. Step 5 here is what triggers the exception:

5. If the Class object is in an erroneous state, then initialization is not possible. Release the lock on the Class object and throw a NoClassDefFoundError.

6-8 continue the initialization, 8 executes the initializers, and what usually happens is in step 9:

9. If the execution of the initializers completes normally, then lock this Class object, label it fully initialized, notify all waiting threads, release the lock, and complete this procedure normally.

But we got an error in the initializer so:

10. Otherwise, the initializers must have completed abruptly by throwing some exception E. If the class of E is not Error or one of its subclasses, then create a new instance of the class ExceptionInInitializerError, with E as the argument, and use this object in place of E in the following step. But if a new instance of ExceptionInInitializerError cannot be created because an OutOfMemoryError occurs, then instead use an OutOfMemoryError object in place of E in the following step.

Yep, we see an ExceptionInInitializerError b/c of the null pointer exception.

11. Lock the Class object, label it erroneous, notify all waiting threads, release the lock, and complete this procedure abruptly with reason E or its replacement as determined in the previous step. (Due to a flaw in some early implementations, a exception during class initialization was ignored, rather than causing an ExceptionInInitializerError as described here.)

And then the class is marked erroneous which is why we get the exception from step 5 the second time.


The surprising part is the third printout which shows that TestClass.class in MainClass actually holds a reference to a physical Class object.

Probably because TestClass still exists, it's just marked erroneous. It has been already loaded and verified.

  • 1
    +1 excellent answer – Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 15 '11 at 3:32
  • 5
    great. this is the problem of the name "NoClassDefFoundError", one has to read the spec to understand it. neither the name nor the javadoc explains what it is. because so many java gurus don't even understand it after so many years, it's safe to say the name is a complete failure. – irreputable Jun 15 '11 at 4:32
  • 1
    "(Due to a flaw in some early implementations, a exception during class initialization was ignored, rather than causing an ExceptionInInitializerError as described here.)" - In which Java versions is this flaw present? I experienced this in Java 1.8.0_25-b17. A NoClassDefFound error was being thrown on class initialisation but the original exception was being thrown away (causing me many hours of stress trying to figure out what was wrong with my classpath). – Alex Spurling Jan 8 '15 at 14:20

Yes, that's usually why NoClassDefFoundError is raised. It's evilly named, that's all. It should've been named as "class init failed exception" or something.

Becuase of the misleading name, java programmers who got this error wasted hundreds of man years trying to figure out why the class cannot be found.

Whenever you see this exception, you should check the log upwards, and try to find out the root cause when the class failed to init.

  • The class is poorly named, but the problem is largely of the programmer's making. His application shouldn't have tried to recover from the NoClassDefFoundError the first time it was raised. – Stephen C Jun 15 '11 at 3:15
  • 1
    I don't find it poorly named. It's at highest a poor choice of an exception to be thrown during class initialization failure. The NoClassDefFoundError has certainly its use in other circumstances (e.g. class definition is not found in runtime classpath while it was sure that it was available in the compiletime classpath). – BalusC Jun 15 '11 at 3:33
  • @BalusC - you said it better about the naming ... – Stephen C Jun 15 '11 at 3:55
  • @Stephen That's unfair to the programmer. In all applications classes are access by multiple threads. If a class fail to initialize, the first thread accessing it gets an init error, other threads accessing it gets an class def not found error. the error is not just poorly named. it is extremely common that static init fails, it deserves a self explanatory name. "class def", whatever it is, (notice the unusual abbr of def), is a jargon unknown to average java programmers, yet it's named so evilly that sends people the wrong message. A completely cryptic name would be better than this one. – irreputable Jun 15 '11 at 4:23
  • @irreputable - the first thread that gets this error should pull the plug on the entire application instead of quietly dying. Install a default uncaught exception handler to do this. – Stephen C Jun 15 '11 at 6:10

When I access such a static field, a NoClassDefFoundError will raised. it seems the VM treat the Class is not complete.

That is correct ...

But when I access the Class, it still available

Yes.

The class loader has not tried to remove the broken class because:

  • it would be difficult to do,
  • it would be extremely difficult to do safely,
  • it would leave the JVM in a state where an application could easily waste lots of time repeatedly loading and reloading broken code, and
  • the specs say (or at least imply) that it shouldn't; see other answers for details.

To get into a state where this inconsistency is visible, your application has to catch ClassDefNotFoundError (or a superclass) and attempted to recover from it. It is a well documented fact that Error exceptions are generally not recoverable; i.e. if you attempt to recover, the JVM may end up in an inconsistent state. That is what has happened here ... with respect to the classes that were being loaded / initialized.

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