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I have a generic function that looks like this:

function joinBy<T, U, K>(data1: Array<T>, data2: Array<U>, key: K) {
  return data2.map( datum2 => {
    return data1.find( datum1 => datum1[key] === datum2[key] )
  })
}

What I would like to do is constrain K to strings that are properties common to both T and U. For example, given the following types:

type Customer = {
  customerId: number,
  name: string,
  email?: string
}

type Order = {
  customerId: number,
  orderId: number,
  items: Array<Item>
}

The only valid value of K should be customerId, since it is common to both types. If both types had another field in common, e.g. foo, then K should be the union 'customerId' | 'foo'.

If I modify the function signature to the following:

function joinBy<T, U, K extends keyof T & keyof U>(data1: Array<T>, data2: Array<U>, key: K) {
  return data2.map( datum2 => {
    return data1.find( datum1 => datum1[key] === datum2[key] )
  })
}

Typescript errors on datum1[key] === datum2[key], saying that types T[K] and U[K] have no overlap. From this Github issue I know that sometimes this error can be a false positive, but I'm not sure if this is one of them or if there's a better way to build the type constraint for K.

Is there a better way to do this, or am I just seeing a false positive? Thanks!

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  • 1
    It's not just that K should be present in keyof T and keyof U, but that T[K] and U[K] should be comparable to each other; if T is Tree with a bark property of type string, and U is Dog with a bark property of type ()=>void, then you don't want to be able to call joinBy(trees, dogs, "bark"), do you? Is the intent that joinBy() will return (T | undefined)[]? – jcalz Aug 21 at 16:31
  • 1
    Does this suffice? If not, pls elaborate. – jcalz Aug 21 at 16:44
  • You're right, typeof T[K] should be the same as typeof U[K]. – diekunstderfuge Aug 21 at 16:47
  • I think your TS Playground linked example gets what I need; if you post as an answer I'll accept. I'm used to Java-style nominal typing; still getting used to TS structural typing. Conceptually, I find constraining K and raising the error there makes more sense, but it's functionally equivalent to the sample you posted. – diekunstderfuge Aug 21 at 18:44
1

In order for your operation to be type safe, you need to make sure not just that K is in both keyof T and keyof U, but that T[K] and U[K] are of the same type (really, that they are comparable via ===). Otherwise you might find yourself accepting this sort of thing:

interface Tree {
  name: string;
  age: number;
  bark: string;
}
interface Dog {
  name: string;
  age: number;
  bark(): void;
}
declare const trees: Tree[];
declare const dogs: Dog[];

joinBy(trees, dogs, "bark"); 

Both a Tree and a Dog have a property named bark, but they are not comparable.

There are ways to tighten the signature up to require that T[K] and U[K] are compatible... multiple ways, in fact.

A big caveat with TS in general is that there are situations, especially with unspecified generic type parameters (like T, U, and K inside the implementation of joinBy()), where a human being can see that something is type safe but the compiler cannot, because the compiler does not perform the right kind of "higher order" reasoning about generic types.

So part of the art of coming up with type signatures for functions like this is getting not only the right constraints, but one that the compiler can actually verify type safety of inside the function implementation. This is not always possible, so sometimes you have to resort to type assertions or the like inside the implementation.

For your function, though, there's a "compiler-friendly" typing:

function joinBy<T, K extends keyof T>(data1: T[], data2: (Pick<T, K>)[], key: K) {
  return data2.map(datum2 => {
    return data1.find(datum1 => datum1[key] === datum2[key])
  })
}

Here, the compiler only needs to care about the element type T of the data1 array, and that the type K of key is one of its known keys. Then, the constraint on data2 is that it must be an array of some type assignable to Pick<T, K>: that is, a type with a K property that is compatible with that of T. We don't really care what specific type data2's elements are, since we're only paying attention to its key property; we don't return any values of that element type, so we don't need to spend any effort inferring a type parameter U for it.

And the compiler is happy to allow datum1[key] === datum2[key] since it sees both of them as type T[K] (or Pick<T, K>[K], which is luckily seen as compatible).

Let's make sure it works:

declare const customers: Customer[];
declare const orders: Order[];
joinBy(customers, orders, "customerId"); // ok
joinBy(customers, orders, "name"); // error!
// -------------> ~~~~~~
// 'name' is missing in Order

joinBy(trees, dogs, "age"); // ok
joinBy(trees, dogs, "bark"); // error! 
// ---------> ~~~~
// 'bark' property incompatible

So that's great.


But, as you mentioned in the comments, it feels like the error on the call signature is in the wrong place. You'd presumably want to see "name" and/or "bark" be the source of the error and not orders or dogs. This is achievable, but (probably) not in a way that the compiler can understand inside the implementation. To get this to happen, I will use something equivalent to a type assertion: a single call-signature overload: let the call signature be a good one for callers, and the implementation signature be a good one for the implementation:

type CompatibleKeys<T, U> = {
  [K in keyof T & keyof U]: U[K] extends T[K] ? K : T[K] extends U[K] ? K : never
}[keyof T & keyof U];

function joinBy<T, U, K extends CompatibleKeys<T, U>>(
  data1: T[],
  data2: U[],
  key: K
): (T | undefined)[];
function joinBy(data1: any[], data2: any[], key: PropertyKey) {
  return data2.map(datum2 => {
    return data1.find(datum1 => datum1[key] === datum2[key])
  })
}

The implementation signature is intentionally full of any there; you can keep the original one with T and K if you want, but in some sense it doesn't matter once you're willing to separate the call side from the implementation side: do whatever you want in the implementation, make sure you are personally convinced of its type safety, and then give the call side a signature that behaves how you want.

Let's see how it behaves now:

joinBy(customers, orders, "name"); // error!
// ---------------------> ~~~~~~
// Argument of type '"name"' is not assignable to parameter of type '"customerId"'.

joinBy(trees, dogs, "bark"); // error! 
// ---------------> ~~~~~~
// Argument of type '"bark"' is not assignable to parameter of type 'CompatibleKeys<Tree, Dog>'

Now the errors appear on the key parameter and they tell you more or less what the problem is. Yay.

Not sure what you want to do about the situation where there is actually no overlap between T and U at all, though. The following should be an error, but what error?

joinBy(orders, trees, "name"); // error!
// -----------------> ~~~~~~
// Argument of type 'string' is not assignable to parameter of type 'never'.

It really feels to me like trees is the mistake here, since there's no valid key you can write. To make that happen you can start adding even more complexity to the joinBy() signature... maybe something like:

type SomeCompatibleType<T> = { [K in keyof T]: Pick<T, K> }[keyof T]

function joinBy<T, U extends SomeCompatibleType<T>, K extends CompatibleKeys<T, U>>(
  data1: T[],
  data2: U[],
  key: K
): (T | undefined)[];
// impl elided

And now you get errors on key unless there's no overlap, in which case there are errors on data2:

joinBy(orders, trees, "name"); // error!
// ----------> ~~~~~
// Argument of type 'Tree[]' is not assignable to parameter of type 'SomeCompatibleType<Order>[]'.

Yay again. Or maybe not... by now the code is so complicated that I'd hesitate from putting it anywhere important. There could be weird edge cases and lots of people won't be able to see what it's doing. So backing up, the compiler-friendly signature is probably what I'd suggest for real.


Okay, hope that helps; good luck!

Playground link

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  • This is a fantastic answer; thank you so much! – diekunstderfuge Aug 24 at 18:01

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