4

I'm using Julia 1.0. Please consider the following code:

using LinearAlgebra
using Distributions

## create random data
const data = rand(Uniform(-1,2), 100000, 2)

function test_function_1(data)
    theta = [1 2]
    coefs = theta * data[:,1:2]'
    res   = coefs' .* data[:,1:2]
    return sum(res, dims = 1)'
end

function test_function_2(data)
    theta   = [1 2]
    sum_all = zeros(2)
    for i = 1:size(data)[1]
        sum_all .= sum_all + (theta * data[i,1:2])[1] *  data[i,1:2]
    end
    return sum_all
end

After running it for the first time, I timed it

julia> @time test_function_1(data)
  0.006292 seconds (16 allocations: 5.341 MiB)
2×1 Adjoint{Float64,Array{Float64,2}}:
 150958.47189289227
 225224.0374366073

julia> @time test_function_2(data)
  0.038112 seconds (500.00 k allocations: 45.777 MiB, 15.61% gc time)
2-element Array{Float64,1}:
 150958.4718928927
 225224.03743660534

test_function_1 is significantly superior, both in allocations and speed, but test_function_1 is not devectorized. I would expect test_function_2 to perform better. Note that both functions do the same.

I have a hunch that it's because in test_function_2, I use sum_all .= sum_all + ..., but I'm not sure why that's a problem. Can I get a hint?

5

So first let me comment how I would write your function if I wanted to use a loop:

function test_function_3(data)
    theta   = (1, 2)
    sum_all = zeros(2)
    for row in eachrow(data)
        sum_all .+= dot(theta, row) .*  row
    end
    return sum_all
end

Next, here is a benchmark comparison of the three options:

julia> @benchmark test_function_1($data)
BenchmarkTools.Trial: 
  memory estimate:  5.34 MiB
  allocs estimate:  16
  --------------
  minimum time:     1.953 ms (0.00% GC)
  median time:      1.986 ms (0.00% GC)
  mean time:        2.122 ms (2.29% GC)
  maximum time:     4.347 ms (8.00% GC)
  --------------
  samples:          2356
  evals/sample:     1

julia> @benchmark test_function_2($data)
BenchmarkTools.Trial: 
  memory estimate:  45.78 MiB
  allocs estimate:  500002
  --------------
  minimum time:     16.316 ms (7.44% GC)
  median time:      16.597 ms (7.63% GC)
  mean time:        16.845 ms (8.01% GC)
  maximum time:     34.050 ms (4.45% GC)
  --------------
  samples:          297
  evals/sample:     1

julia> @benchmark test_function_3($data)
BenchmarkTools.Trial: 
  memory estimate:  96 bytes
  allocs estimate:  1
  --------------
  minimum time:     777.204 μs (0.00% GC)
  median time:      791.458 μs (0.00% GC)
  mean time:        799.505 μs (0.00% GC)
  maximum time:     1.262 ms (0.00% GC)
  --------------
  samples:          6253
  evals/sample:     1

Next you can go a bit faster if you explicitly implement the dot in the loop:

julia> function test_function_4(data)
           theta   = (1, 2)
           sum_all = zeros(2)
           for row in eachrow(data)
               @inbounds sum_all .+= (theta[1]*row[1]+theta[2]*row[2]) .*  row
           end
           return sum_all
       end
test_function_4 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> @benchmark test_function_4($data)
BenchmarkTools.Trial: 
  memory estimate:  96 bytes
  allocs estimate:  1
  --------------
  minimum time:     502.367 μs (0.00% GC)
  median time:      502.547 μs (0.00% GC)
  mean time:        505.446 μs (0.00% GC)
  maximum time:     806.631 μs (0.00% GC)
  --------------
  samples:          9888
  evals/sample:     1

To understand the differences let us have a look at this line of your code:

sum_all .= sum_all + (theta * data[i,1:2])[1] *  data[i,1:2]

Let us count the memory allocations you do in this expression:

sum_all .= 
    sum_all
    + # allocation of a new vector as a result of addition
    (theta
     *  # allocation of a new vector as a result of multiplication
     data[i,1:2] # allocation of a new vector via getindex
    )[1]
    * # allocation of a new vector as a result of multiplication
    data[i,1:2] # allocation of a new vector via getindex

So you can see that in each iteration of the loop you allocate five times. Allocations are expensive. And you can see this in the benchmarks that you have 5000002 allocations in the process:

  • 1 allocation of sum_all
  • 1 allocation of theta
  • 500000 allocations in the loop (5 * 100000)

Additionally you perform indexing like data[i,1:2] which performs bounds checking, which is also a small cost (but marginal in comparison to allocations).

Now in function test_function_3 I use eachrow(data). This time I also get rows of data matrix, but they are returned as views (not new matrices) so no allocation happens inside the loop. Next I use a dot function again to avoid allocation that was earlier caused by a matrix multiplication (I have changed theta to a Tuple from a Matrix as then dot is a bit faster, but this secondary). Finally I write um_all .+= dot(theta, row) .* row and in this case all operations are broadcasted, so Julia can do broadcast fusion (again - no allocations happen).

In test_function_4 I just replace dot by unrolled loop as we know we have two elements to calculate the dot product for. Actually if you fully unroll everything and use @simd it gets even faster:

julia> function test_function_5(data)
          theta   = (1, 2)
          s1 = 0.0
          s2 = 0.0
          @inbounds @simd for i in axes(data, 1)
               r1 = data[i, 1]
               r2 = data[i, 2]
               mul = theta[1]*r1 + theta[2]*r2
               s1 += mul * r1
               s2 += mul * r2
          end
          return [s1, s2]
       end
test_function_5 (generic function with 1 method)

julia> @benchmark test_function_5($data)
BenchmarkTools.Trial: 
  memory estimate:  96 bytes
  allocs estimate:  1
  --------------
  minimum time:     22.721 μs (0.00% GC)
  median time:      23.146 μs (0.00% GC)
  mean time:        24.306 μs (0.00% GC)
  maximum time:     100.109 μs (0.00% GC)
  --------------
  samples:          10000
  evals/sample:     1

So you can see that this way you are around 100x faster than with test_function_1. Still already test_function_3 is relatively fast and it is fully generic so probably normally I would write something like test_function_3 unless I really needed to be super fast and knew that the dimensions of my data are fixed and small.

3
  • Could you explain why your function is superior? – user1691278 Aug 21 '20 at 23:13
  • In test_function_5, instead of eachrow(data), you use indexing, as in r1 = data[i, 1]. Wouldn't that make you allocate? – user1691278 Aug 22 '20 at 1:41
  • 1
    Ah - that is a good question. The difference is that data[i, 1] gets a single cell (a Float64 value) from a Matrix, so it does not allocate. If we have written e.g. data[i, 1:1] we would get a 1-element Vector holding that single cell and then it would allocate. – Bogumił Kamiński Aug 22 '20 at 6:00

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