0

if I have a field in class like below,

class MyClass {
public:
    shared_ptr<map<int, int>> my_map;
}

The default map<int,int>'s comparison function is less<int>, but I would like to initialize my_map as

my_map = make_shared<map<int, int, greater<int>>>();

sometimes,

This doesnt compile, what other way I can have a shared_ptr<map<int, int>> that in two different object of MyClass, one has less<int> and the other have greater<int> so that the my_map in each object is sorted differently?

  • You should include the error message from your compiler, verbatim. That would point our your typo. – Eljay Aug 22 at 14:37
  • 1
    What error do you get, maybe you just need to separate the two > brackets (if you are compiling against a standard < c++17). – M.A Aug 22 at 14:37
  • Can you stick your whole code in the question? Makes it easier to see what might be wrong. – Carlos Aug 22 at 14:40
  • May I ask why do you need to shared_ptr<> your map? – Tanveer Badar Aug 22 at 15:00
2

what other way I can have a shared_ptr<map<int, int>> that in two different object of MyClass, one has less<int> and the other have greater<int> so that the my_map in each object is sorted differently?

You can specify std::function as the template argument for comparator as

std::shared_ptr<std::map<int, int, std::function<bool(int,int)>>> my_map;

and initialize it with std::less<int>

my_map = std::make_shared<std::map<int, int, std::function<bool(int,int)>>>(std::less<int>{});

or std::greater<int>.

my_map = std::make_shared<std::map<int, int, std::function<bool(int,int)>>>(std::greater<int>{});
| improve this answer | |
  • It woukd be expensive to do std::function<bool(int,int)>, where it fits with just uing functionPointer = bool(*)(int)(int). – Const Aug 22 at 19:20
  • @Const But std::less and std::greater can't be used with function pointer. – songyuanyao Aug 23 at 1:15
  • thanks for this answer, i have tested, it works, just a further question, I believe you are refering to this constructor explicit map (const key_compare& comp, const allocator_type& alloc = allocator_type()); here cplusplus.com/reference/map/map/map ? How did you know that the return type is std::map<int, int, std::function<bool(int,int)>>? I cant find this anywhere in the official doc. – tesla1060 Aug 24 at 1:43
  • @tesla1060 Yes, that constructor is used. The type, i.e. std::map<int, int, std::function<bool(int,int)>> is specified as the template argument when calling std::make_shared, then we'll get a shared_ptr pointing to std::map<int, int, std::function<bool(int,int)>>. – songyuanyao Aug 24 at 1:47
2

You can use a custom comparator, something like:

struct my_comparator {

     bool the_other_way=false;

     my_comparator(bool flag) : the_other_way{flag} {}

     bool operator()(int a, int b) const
     {
         return the_other_way ? a > b: a < b;
     }
};

And construct a std::map<int, int, my_comparator>.

std::map has an overloaded constructor that takes an instance of the comparator object as a parameter. You can simply construct each individual map, accordingly.

typedef std::map<int, int, my_comparator> my_map;

my_map m1{my_comparator{false}};

my_map m2{my_comparator{true}};
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1

If you want to customize the internal map with a different comparator for different objects, you can template the class to accept a comparison object, like this:

template<typename Compare = std::less<int>>
class MyClass 
{
  public:
    std::shared_ptr<std::map<int, int, Compare>> my_map;
};

and then create different objects:

int main()
{
    MyClass<> a;   // std::less<int> by default
    MyClass<std::greater<int>> b;
}

Here's a demo.

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0

The comparator is part of the type declaration, so your member would need to include the comparator type:

class MyClass {
public:
    shared_ptr<map<int, int, greater<int>>> my_map;
}

Also, you are missing a '>' in the assignment. It should be:

my_map = make_shared<map<int, int, greater<int>>>();

See cigien's answer if you want to templatize your class to use different comparators (as the question implies).

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