1

ThisAnd thisI am trying to get the things written in a .txt file called CodeHere.txt and here is my main.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;


int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    string line;
    string lines[100];
    ifstream myfile ("CodeHere.txt");
    int i = 0;
    if (myfile.is_open())
    {
      while ( getline (myfile,line) )
      {
          lines[0] = line;
          i++;
          
      }
      myfile.close();
    }

    else cout << "Unable to open file";
    
    cout << lines[0];
    
    myfile.close();

    return 0;
}

And the output is: Writing this to a file.Program ended with exit code: 0

But in my CodeHere.txt it has: hello

I tried saving it, but the result didn't change. I'm not sure whats going on. Can anyone help?

23
  • "And the output is: Writing this to a file...". I don't see how that's possible. Please show the exact code that you're running.
    – cigien
    Aug 23, 2020 at 21:32
  • I put the pictures one is auto showing and for the other click the link. @cigien
    – Omer
    Aug 23, 2020 at 21:38
  • lines[i] = line; cout<<lines; but we are just reading from a file. Aug 23, 2020 at 21:40
  • I can't reproduce. Seems to work fine. Are you sure you're compiling and running the correct program? I don't see where Writing this to a file is could come from.
    – cigien
    Aug 23, 2020 at 21:40
  • 1
    @Omer: yes I believe it is the text file. Try not to copy and paste but type Hello yourself into a new text file, perhaps there is some weird end-of-line invisible symbol your editor inserts into the txt file that ifstream is not able to recognize.
    – Giogre
    Aug 23, 2020 at 22:13

3 Answers 3

1

Are you sure that your .txt file is in the same repertory? To me, it just looks like you entered the path wrong. Try with the absolute path (full one). Another option is that you haven't saved the text file yet, you're just editing it, and so it is in fact empty, that would be why your cout doesn't print anything.

3
  • It was probably reading the wrong file. I was messing around before this and may have created a invisible file which it thought it should read. When i gave the full path it worked
    – Omer
    Aug 23, 2020 at 22:24
  • @Omer: the text file should be in the same folder of the c++ project, if you want to avoid having to give the full path to ifstream
    – Giogre
    Aug 23, 2020 at 22:26
  • @Omer I'm glad you got it figured out! If you want to use a relative path, be carefull. Depending on your IDE, the path may end up relative to your source code (as intended) or relative to the compiled code (probably not in the same directory /!\).
    – Vélimir
    Aug 23, 2020 at 22:28
1

This should work, using a vector<string> to store the lines read from file

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    string line;
    vector<string> lines;
    ifstream myfile ("CodeHere.txt");
    int i = 0;
    if (myfile.is_open())
    {
        while ( getline(myfile, line) )
        {
             lines.push_back(line);
             i++;       
        }
        myfile.close();
    }
    else {
        cout << "Unable to open file";
        return -1;
    }

    cout << lines[0] << '\n';

return 0;
}
6
  • Nope , I think it's a bug, it shows the exact same thing. There must be a problem with the file or xcode. And also did you notice there is a question mark next to the txt file, do you know what that means?
    – Omer
    Aug 23, 2020 at 21:41
  • Test the program with some other text file. It works fine on my computer, reads any first line of any .txt file I tried with success.
    – Giogre
    Aug 23, 2020 at 21:50
  • Both your code and the OP's code will only output the first line that was read in. Aug 23, 2020 at 21:51
  • If you are using std::vector, you don't need the i variable. Aug 23, 2020 at 21:52
  • 1
    @ThomasMatthews: you are right in both instances, the code will output the first line only, and the i is useless, but I am not the author so I don't know whether this will be used in some ways that will require to leave the oddities where they are.
    – Giogre
    Aug 23, 2020 at 21:55
1

Try this:

  vector<string> lines;
  if (file.is_open()) {
    // read all lines from the file
    std::string line;
    while (getline(file, line)) {
      lines.emplace_back(line);
    }
    file.close();
  }
  else {
    cout << "Unable to open file";
    return -1;
  }
  cout << "file has " << lines.size() << " lines." << endl;
  for (auto l : lines) {
    cout << l << endl;
  } 
1
  • file has 1 lines. Writing this to a file. Program ended with exit code: 0 still doesn't work I'm gonna use another IDE i think there is a problem with Xcode
    – Omer
    Aug 23, 2020 at 22:07

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