6

I'm learning about scopes in Powershell and have some questions:

  1. About the "Local scope": From what i read, the local scope is always the current scope. So, by default, when we create an item (without scope modifier), e.g. a variable, in some scope, let it be script or global, the scope will be script/global accordingly. So my question is: when will we need to explicitly specify the local modifier?
  2. MSDN says:

You can create a new scope by running a script or function, by creating a session, or by starting a new instance of PowerShell. When you create a new scope, the result is a parent scope (the original scope) and a child scope (the scope that you created). ...
Unless you explicitly make the items private, the items in the parent scope are available to the child scope. However, items that you create and change in the child scope do not affect the parent scope, unless you explicitly specify the scope when you create the items.

But when i try the following:

PS> $Name = "John"
PS> Powershell.exe
PS>echo $Name  // No Output

It seems from the quote above that the "starting a new instance of powershell" is a child scope, so all the items in the parent scope should be visible there. Can someone explain?

1
  • Sessions (Enter-PSSession) won't inherit the variables either... I think the help is old and/or incorrect there...
    – T-Me
    Aug 24, 2020 at 7:30

2 Answers 2

4

Starting with the latter question:

Scopes come in play with functions and invoked scripts(cmdlets), like:

Function Test {
    $Test++
    Write-Host 'Local:' $Test
}
$Test = 5
Test
Write-Host 'Global:' $Test

Returns:

Local: 6
Global: 5

And:

Function Test {
    $Global:Test++
    Write-Host 'Local:' $Test
}
$Test = 5
Test
Write-Host 'Global:' $Test

Returns:

Local: 6
Global: 6

Or if you put the function in a script (e.g. MyScript.ps1):

$Test = 5
.\MyScript.ps1
Write-Host $Test # $Test is unaffected unless you use the $Global scope in your script

Which will return basically the same results as above, unless you Dot-Source your script where it will run in the current scope:

$Test = 5
. .\MyScript.ps1
Write-Host $Test # $Test might be affected by MyScript.ps1 if you just use $Test

For what you are doing:
You are creating a complete new PowerShell session (with Powershell.exe) which will start with a fresh list of variables.
Note here that you will see the initial variables again if you exit from the new session:

PS C:\> $Name = "John"
PS C:\> Powershell.exe
Windows PowerShell
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Try the new cross-platform PowerShell https://aka.ms/pscore6

PS C:\> Write-Host 'New session' $Name
New session
PS C:\> Exit
PS C:\> Write-Host 'Initial session' $Name
Initial session John

Which regards to the first question, I don't think that there are many applications where you need to explicitly refer to the $Local scope, but to give you an example where you might use it:

$Test = 5
Function Test {
    Write-Host ($Local:Test++)
}
Test

In the above example the unary increment operator will start with 0 if you explicitly use the $Local scope (in fact you starting with an empty local variable which will cast to 0) and with 5 if you omit the $Local scope where you will inherit a copy of the $Test variable out of the parent scope.

3
  • "You are creating a complete new PowerShell session (with Powershell.exe) which will start with a fresh list of variables." I Know, but MSDN says that a new instance of powershell is considered a "child scope", which should be able to read variables of parent scope. I'm just trying to figure out if i'm missing something or that statement is just wrong..
    – YoavKlein
    Aug 24, 2020 at 9:15
  • 2
    "[...] MSDN says that a new instance of powershell is considered a "child scope"" can you provide a link to where it says that? Sounds like the docs need an update Aug 24, 2020 at 10:45
  • 1
    @MathiasR.Jessen Please see github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/issues/6541
    – mklement0
    Aug 24, 2020 at 16:28
2

To complement iRon's helpful answer:

  1. [...] when will we need to explicitly specify the local modifier?

$local: is rarely required, because the local scope is implied in the absence of a scope specifier.

However, that only applies if the referenced variable actually exists as a local variable, given that PowerShell's dynamic scoping makes variables from ancestral (parent) scopes visible to descendant (child) scopes as well (see this answer for more information):

  • For example, say you have $foo = 'bar' declared in the global scope, then referring to $foo in a script would look for a local $foo instance first; if there is none, a $foo defined in an ancestral (parent) scope is used, if any, which would be the global $foo in this example, and 'bar' would be returned.

  • By contrast, if, in your script, you use $local:foo, without a local $foo variable being defined, you either get $null by default or, if Set-StrictMode -Version 2 or higher is in effect, a statement-terminating error occurs.


  1. MSDN says: [...] by creating a session, or by starting a new instance of PowerShell [...] the result is a parent scope (the original scope) and a child scope (the scope that you created).

The documentation is incorrect in this regard as of this writing (a GitHub issue has been filed):

  • Ancestral (parent-child) relationships between scopes exist only in the context of a given session (runspace).

    • That is, dynamic scoping - the visibility of variables and other definitions from ancestral scopes - only applies to scopes within a given session.

    • A notable exception is that functions from a module do not run in a child scope of the calling scope - except if the that calling scope happens to be the global scope; modules have their own scope domains (technically called session states) that are linked to the global scope only - see this GitHub docs issue for a discussion.

  • Therefore, no child scope of the calling scope is created in the following scenarios, where the newly launched code knows nothing of the variables (and other definitions) in the calling scope:

    • Starting a new session via PowerShell remoting (e.g., with Enter-PSSession) or Invoke-Command -Computer

    • Starting a background [thread] job with Start-Job or Start-ThreadJob or running threads in parallel with ForEach-Object -Parallel in v7.0+

    • Starting a new PowerShell instance (process), using the PowerShell CLI (pwsh for PowerShell [Core], powershell.exe for Windows PowerShell).

    • To communicate values from the calling scope to the newly launched code in these scenarios, explicit action is required:

      • When calling the CLI or using Start-Job, where a child process on the same machine is created, only environment variables defined in the calling process become automatically available to the child process.
      • Otherwise, values from the caller must be passed as arguments or - except when using the CLI - via the $using: scope - see this answer.

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