2

Given n, I want to zero out the last n bytes of a __m128i vector.

For instance consider the following __m128i vector:

11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111

After zeroing out the last n = 4 bytes, the vector should look like:

11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000

Is there a SSE intrinsic function that does this (by accepting a __128i vector and n as parameters)?

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  • 1
    I assume, n is not known at compile time? What SSE version are you targeting?
    – chtz
    Aug 25, 2020 at 16:16
  • Clearing can be done with a pair of shifts; can you use two intrinsic functions?
    – Milag
    Aug 25, 2020 at 17:05

2 Answers 2

5

There are various options that don't rely on AVX512. For example:

unaligned load

char mask[32] = { 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
                  0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
                  -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
                  -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1};

__m128i zeroLowestNBytes(__m128i x, uint32_t n)
{
    __m128i m = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i*)&mask[16 - n]);
    return _mm_and_si128(x, m);
}

With AVX, the load can become a memory operand of the vpand. Without AVX it's still fine, with movdqu and pand.

The load being unaligned isn't normally a problem, unless it crosses a 4K boundary. If you can get mask 32-aligned then that problem would go away. The load would still be unaligned, but wouldn't hit that particular edge case.

n is an uint32_t to avoid sign-extension.

broadcast & compare

__m128i zeroLowestNBytes(__m128i x, int n)
{
    __m128i threshold = _mm_set1_epi8(n);
    __m128i index = _mm_set_epi8(15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0);
    return _mm_andnot_si128(_mm_cmpgt_epi8(threshold, index), x);
}

This avoids the unaligned load, but that shouldn't really matter. More importantly, it avoids the "input-dependent load": in the version with the unaligned load, the load depends on n. In this version, the load is independent of n. For example, that allows a compiler to hoist it out of a loop, if this function is inlined. It also allows out-of-order execution more freedom to start the load early, perhaps before n has been computed.

The flipside is, it basically requires AVX2 or SSSE3 for a decent realization of _mm_set1_epi8(n). Also, this normally costs more instructions, which may be worse for throughput. The latency should be better, since there is no load in the "main chain" (there is a load, but it's off to the side, it doesn't add its latency to the latency of the computation).

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  • 4
    alignas(32) char mask[] = {...} is ISO C11 (with #include <stdalign.h> and also standard ISO C++11. Aug 25, 2020 at 20:55
  • 3
    _mm_set1_epi8 is not bad with just SSSE3 for pshufb with an all-0 vector. It just costs 1 extra pxor-zeroing instruction vs. vpbroadcastb. If the critical path is through the __m128i x, not int n, then either way is good. Aug 25, 2020 at 20:56
  • 1
    If the critical path is through n, there's not a huge difference in latency. If runtime variable n starts in an integer register, a load can use n in an addressing mode directly. 128-bit vector load-use is about 5 or 6 cycles avoiding cache-line splits on SnB-family if hot in L1d. So load + PAND latency ~= 6 or 7 cycles from n ready to retval ready. The ALU way costs movd (1c Intel, 3 on Zen, much worse on Bulldozer) + shuffle (1c) + pcmpgt (1c) + pandn (1c) = 4c on Intel best case, 6 on Zen. Bulldozer is mostly irrelevant, but has 2c SIMD ALU latency and much slower MOVD. Aug 26, 2020 at 0:35
  • 1
    So almost always, saving front-end uops with an unaligned load is good. The broadcast way still needs a data load that can cache miss. (Unless this is in a loop and that's hoisted) Aug 26, 2020 at 0:36
  • 1
    @RonakSharma better to write alignas(32) const char mask[] = ... Machine code is the same, but the attributes are specific to gcc/clang, while alignas is in the language standard (will work for all modern compilers).
    – Soonts
    Aug 28, 2020 at 9:26
2

You should be able to achieve the desired result by "broadcasting" zero to the desired bytes at the end of your vector using _mm_mask_set1_epi8 intrinsic:

__m128i _mm_mask_set1_epi8 (__m128i src, __mmask16 k, char a)
  • src is your __m128i vector
  • __mmask16 is constructed from n as (1 << n) - 1, i.e. a mask with n ones at the end
  • char a is zero
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  • 2
    _mm_mask_set1_epi8 requires AVX512, though (not sure if OP has that).
    – chtz
    Aug 25, 2020 at 16:14

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