2

I am trying to figure out the best way to show three divs spaced, with the same image flowing behind them.

See image from my sketch file:

3 divs with same background

My first try was one image absolute behind the 3 divs The 3 divs would have an ":after" pseudo element that had the dark background dotted design, so it covers the colorful image that would be seen otherwise.

See image: (pseudo element isnt perfect right now, but im sure you get the idea... i gave the piece a drop-shadow too for easy viewing...)

enter image description here

But the dots wont always match up with the background and I figure there must be a more elegant way to do this. The other option i guess is to somehow use the same image 3 times and somehow position it just right in each of the 3 divs?

Any thoughts? Is there a background-clipping property that would work here?

3
  • Does this help? stackoverflow.com/questions/39233745/… – Jake B. Aug 25 '20 at 17:29
  • interesting although that uses my first try... with a pseduo element idea. But it only works nice when the background behind is a solid color. And my 3 divs have rounded corners... – SaltnPixels Aug 25 '20 at 17:53
  • have you tried getting 3 div boxes and load the same image into the background of the div boxes while you reposition the background image with an offset? Otherwise use a vector graphic not a full image as body background. A black background with a single dot that is repeated infinite horizontally and vertically. Easier to implement that into pseude elemts aswell. – tacoshy Aug 25 '20 at 17:57
1

Here is a trick using pseudo-element and mask where you don't need to handle any offset and it will be responsive. The trick is to apply a pseudo element that you make relative to the container (and not the child elements) then you clip the non needed part with the mask to get the needed result:

.container {
  padding: 20px;
  display: flex;
  position: relative;
}

.container > div {
  margin: 0 10px;
  flex-grow: 1;
  border-radius: 20px;
  height: 250px;
  box-sizing:border-box;
  -webkit-mask: linear-gradient(#fff, #fff);
          mask: linear-gradient(#fff, #fff);
}

.container > div::before {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  z-index:-1;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  background: url(https://picsum.photos/id/107/1000/800) center/cover;
}

.container > div > div {
  height:100%;
  border:2px solid #000;
  border-radius: 20px;
  text-align:center;
  box-sizing:border-box;
}

body {
  background:#f3f3f3;
}
<div class="container">
  <div>
    <div>Some</div>
  </div>
  <div>
    <div>Text</div>
  </div>
  <div>
    <div>here</div>
  </div>
</div>

6
  • This looks very versatile! Now I gotta figure out how mask works... I was looking at css clipping paht stuff but I could not get it working. I started using javascript to calculate the image and background-positions... This looks neater – SaltnPixels Aug 26 '20 at 3:13
  • im trying to understand the voodoo going on. So really the mask is meant to clip the background image? But we arent giving it a transparent gradient so its just showing the entire rounded div... and somehow clipping the pseudo element? – SaltnPixels Aug 26 '20 at 3:18
  • @SaltnPixels the trick is that you have 3 identical pseudo element on the top of each other since I made them relative to the container and not to the child element (you can notice this if you remove the mask). Then the mask will clip each based on the child shape and we have our illusion. 3 image on the top of each other that we cut at different places – Temani Afif Aug 26 '20 at 8:31
  • Yes, I understand the background image part. It's the mask part that confuses me. I guess it's acting like an overflow: hidden on the pseudo element. – SaltnPixels Aug 26 '20 at 13:39
  • 1
    @SaltnPixels yes exactly like overflow:hidden .. overflow will not work in this case because the pseudo element is not relative to the element so it has no effect but the mask will have an effect ;) .. clip-path also can do the job but it will not keep the radius – Temani Afif Aug 26 '20 at 13:43
0

body {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 10px;
  background-color: black;
}

.wrapper {
  display: grid;
  height: 100%;
  width: 320px;
  grid-template-columns: repeat(3, 1fr);
  column-gap: 10px;
  grid-template-columns: auto;
}

.left {
  height: 300px;
  grid-column: 1 / 2;
  grid-row: 1 / 2;
  background-image: url('https://www.tacoshy.de/Images/Yoshi/IMAG0735.jpg');
  background-size: cover;
  border-radius: 10px;
}

.middle {
  height: 300px;
  grid-column: 2 / 3;
  grid-row: 1 / 2;
  background-color: red;
    background-image: url('https://www.tacoshy.de/Images/Yoshi/IMAG0735.jpg');
  background-size: cover;
  background-position: left -110px top 0;
  border-radius: 10px;
}

.right {
  height: 300px;
  grid-column: 3 / 4;
  grid-row: 1 / 2;
  background-color: red;
    background-image: url('https://www.tacoshy.de/Images/Yoshi/IMAG0735.jpg');
  background-size: cover;
  background-position: left -220px top 0;
  border-radius: 10px;
}
  
<body>
  <div class="wrapper">
    <div class="left"></div>
    <div class="middle"></div>
    <div class="right"></div>
  </div>
</body>

use background image offset to do it.

2
  • While this works, it involves knowing exact pixel sizes... – SaltnPixels Aug 26 '20 at 3:10
  • I guess with javascript you can run through the items in the grid and set background positions. – SaltnPixels Aug 26 '20 at 3:20

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