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We are trying to produce a real-time dashboard in plotly-dash that displays live data as it is produced. We are generally following the guidance here (https://dash.plotly.com/live-updates).

We have a callback that gathers a chunk of new data points from the source approximately every second and then appends the data to the graph.

When we do this the update to the graph is choppy because we are generating a new graph object on the callback every second. We want the graph to flow smoothly, even if that means we're a second or two behind the live data.

We are looking at animations (https://plotly.com/python/animations/) but it's not clear how we might apply an animation to a live stream of data being appended to a graph.

6
  • How fast should the graph update be? Is 1s refresh rate sufficient, or should it be faster?
    – emher
    Sep 2 '20 at 14:00
  • @DavidParks Thank you for accepting my answer. How are things running on your end now?
    – vestland
    Sep 2 '20 at 19:08
  • 1
    Fantastic answer, thanks! We are seeing the performance degrade over time when we do the plots in a callback, we're working on figuring out why your code doesn't seem to experience the same because it seems like what we have is doing the same thing, just returning a figure. Sep 2 '20 at 19:16
  • 1
    @DavidParks I see... Well, I can only suggest that you, if it's at possible wrt the data etc, try and put together a reproducible code snippet that replicates the problem and write up another question targeting the performance issues directly.
    – vestland
    Sep 2 '20 at 19:22
  • 1
    Yeah, we've got a minimally reproducible example now, but there are a number of forum posts on the topic we need to follow up on before opening a question specifically on the performance issue. This question has helped us a lot in working out how to structure the process. The piece we're adding to this is that we have a subgraph of 32 traces with a lot more data in each one. The client-side updates may be the answer to that. Sep 2 '20 at 19:36
29
+200

Updating traces of a Graph component without generating a new graph object can be achieved via the extendData property. Here is a small example that appends data each second,

import dash
import dash_html_components as html
import dash_core_components as dcc
import numpy as np

from dash.dependencies import Input, Output

# Example data (a circle).
resolution = 20
t = np.linspace(0, np.pi * 2, resolution)
x, y = np.cos(t), np.sin(t)
# Example app.
figure = dict(data=[{'x': [], 'y': []}], layout=dict(xaxis=dict(range=[-1, 1]), yaxis=dict(range=[-1, 1])))
app = dash.Dash(__name__, update_title=None)  # remove "Updating..." from title
app.layout = html.Div([dcc.Graph(id='graph', figure=figure), dcc.Interval(id="interval")])


@app.callback(Output('graph', 'extendData'), [Input('interval', 'n_intervals')])
def update_data(n_intervals):
    index = n_intervals % resolution
    # tuple is (dict of new data, target trace index, number of points to keep)
    return dict(x=[[x[index]]], y=[[y[index]]]), [0], 10


if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.run_server()

Depending of the network connection between client and server (at each update, a request is exchanged between client and server), this approach works up to a refresh rate of around 1s.

If you need a higher refresh rate, i would suggest doing the graph update using a client side callback. Adopting the previous example, the code would be along the lines of

import dash
import dash_html_components as html
import dash_core_components as dcc
import numpy as np

from dash.dependencies import Input, Output, State

# Example data (a circle).
resolution = 1000
t = np.linspace(0, np.pi * 2, resolution)
x, y = np.cos(t), np.sin(t)
# Example app.
figure = dict(data=[{'x': [], 'y': []}], layout=dict(xaxis=dict(range=[-1, 1]), yaxis=dict(range=[-1, 1])))
app = dash.Dash(__name__, update_title=None)  # remove "Updating..." from title
app.layout = html.Div([
    dcc.Graph(id='graph', figure=dict(figure)), dcc.Interval(id="interval", interval=25),
    dcc.Store(id='offset', data=0), dcc.Store(id='store', data=dict(x=x, y=y, resolution=resolution)),
])
app.clientside_callback(
    """
    function (n_intervals, data, offset) {
        offset = offset % data.x.length;
        const end = Math.min((offset + 10), data.x.length);
        return [[{x: [data.x.slice(offset, end)], y: [data.y.slice(offset, end)]}, [0], 500], end]
    }
    """,
    [Output('graph', 'extendData'), Output('offset', 'data')],
    [Input('interval', 'n_intervals')], [State('store', 'data'), State('offset', 'data')]
)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.run_server()

Client side updates should be fast enough to achieve a smooth update. The gif below shows the above example running with 25 ms refresh rate,

Client side update

Keep in mind that a client side update is only possible if the data is already present client side, i.e. another mechanism is needed to fetch the data from the server. A possible data flow could be

  1. Use a slow Interval component (e.g. 2 s) to trigger a (normal) callback that fetches a chunk of data from the source and places it in a Store component
  2. Use a fast Interval component (e.g. 25 ms) to trigger a client side callback that streams data from the Store component to the Graph component
4
  • 2
    That really turned into a great solution! And a truly deserved theft on "my" acceptance mark...
    – vestland
    Sep 6 '20 at 12:09
  • is ExtendData the same as ExtendTraces?
    – Brethlosze
    May 6 '21 at 20:50
  • I am right, or this example only updates fast, but do not animates?
    – Brethlosze
    May 7 '21 at 0:41
  • Can you demonstrate whether this is faster than @vestland's dataframe method?
    – theo-brown
    Nov 28 '21 at 22:35
8
+100

Edit: Revision 1

You'll find a fully reproducible, albeit minimal code snippet at the end of my suggestion. But beware that it's an example designed to be fired up in JupyterDash.


I'll just have to assume that you're gathering your data stream in one or more pandas dataframes. To simulate what I understand to be your real-world situation, I'll just have to rely on the generation of some random data. In the following revision to my original answer, I will argue that the only thing you'll need to make a smooth animation with real-time data, is

1. df.plot() with pandas plotting backend set to plotly,

2. a dash component like this:

   dcc.Interval(id='interval-component',
                interval=1*1000, # in milliseconds
                n_intervals=0
        )

3. and a callback function like this:

@app.callback(
    Output('graph', 'figure'),
    [Input('interval-component', "n_intervals")]
)

The snippet below contains code that does exactly what you describe in your question:

1. It gathers a chunk of random data in a dataframe df2 every second,

2. adds that to an existing data frame df1, and

3. plots the result.

The initial figure looks like this:

enter image description here

After a few seconds the figure looks like this:

enter image description here

And this may sound too good to be true, but the transitions between the figures look pretty great right out of the box. New points are added gracefully at the end of the lines, and both the x- and y-axis update pretty smoothly.

The updating might seem a bit choppy at first, but after a few thousand runs you'll only see the end of the lines moving:

enter image description here

In the figure above you can see that the starting point is included after a few thousand runs. This is probably obvious, but if you'd like to keep a constant window length after for example 1000 runs, just include replace df3 = df3.cumsum() with df3 = df3.cumsum().tail(1000) to get:

enter image description here

But you don't have to take my word for it. Just fire up the following snippet in JupyterLab and see for yourself:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import plotly.express as px
import plotly.graph_objects as go
from jupyter_dash import JupyterDash
import dash_core_components as dcc
import dash_html_components as html
from dash.dependencies import Input, Output

# code and plot setup
# settings
pd.options.plotting.backend = "plotly"
countdown = 20
#global df

# sample dataframe of a wide format
np.random.seed(4); cols = list('abc')
X = np.random.randn(50,len(cols))  
df=pd.DataFrame(X, columns=cols)
df.iloc[0]=0;

# plotly figure
fig = df.plot(template = 'plotly_dark')

app = JupyterDash(__name__)
app.layout = html.Div([
    html.H1("Streaming of random data"),
            dcc.Interval(
            id='interval-component',
            interval=1*1000, # in milliseconds
            n_intervals=0
        ),
    dcc.Graph(id='graph'),
])

# Define callback to update graph
@app.callback(
    Output('graph', 'figure'),
    [Input('interval-component', "n_intervals")]
)
def streamFig(value):
    
    global df
    
    Y = np.random.randn(1,len(cols))  
    df2 = pd.DataFrame(Y, columns = cols)
    df = df.append(df2, ignore_index=True)#.reset_index()
    df.tail()
    df3=df.copy()
    df3 = df3.cumsum()
    fig = df3.plot(template = 'plotly_dark')
    #fig.show()
    return(fig)

app.run_server(mode='external', port = 8069, dev_tools_ui=True, #debug=True,
              dev_tools_hot_reload =True, threaded=True)

This example is not very elegant, and there's plenty of room for improvement (even a global variable....), but I hope it will be useful to you.

Edit: Revision 2:

After about 6000 runs the chart will look like this:

enter image description here

And now things aren't that fun to look at anymore, although things are running very smoothly. Every update just reveals a tiny movement at the endpoints. So I added some annotations there at the end to make it more clear that things are in fact still running:

Complete code with annotations

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import plotly.express as px
import plotly.graph_objects as go
from jupyter_dash import JupyterDash
import dash_core_components as dcc
import dash_html_components as html
from dash.dependencies import Input, Output

# code and plot setup
# settings
pd.options.plotting.backend = "plotly"
countdown = 20
#global df

# sample dataframe of a wide format
np.random.seed(4); cols = list('abc')
X = np.random.randn(50,len(cols))  
df=pd.DataFrame(X, columns=cols)
df.iloc[0]=0;

# plotly figure
fig = df.plot(template = 'plotly_dark')

app = JupyterDash(__name__)
app.layout = html.Div([
    html.H1("Streaming of random data"),
            dcc.Interval(
            id='interval-component',
            interval=1*1000, # in milliseconds
            n_intervals=0
        ),
    dcc.Graph(id='graph'),
])

# Define callback to update graph
@app.callback(
    Output('graph', 'figure'),
    [Input('interval-component', "n_intervals")]
)
def streamFig(value):
    
    global df
    
    Y = np.random.randn(1,len(cols))  
    df2 = pd.DataFrame(Y, columns = cols)
    df = df.append(df2, ignore_index=True)#.reset_index()
    #df.tail()
    df3=df.copy()
    df3 = df3.cumsum()#.tail(1000)
    fig = df3.plot(template = 'plotly_dark')
    #fig.show()
    
    colors = px.colors.qualitative.Plotly
    for i, col in enumerate(df3.columns):
            fig.add_annotation(x=df3.index[-1], y=df3[col].iloc[-1],
                                   text = str(df3[col].iloc[-1])[:4],
                                   align="right",
                                   arrowcolor = 'rgba(0,0,0,0)',
                                   ax=25,
                                   ay=0,
                                   yanchor = 'middle',
                                   font = dict(color = colors[i]))
    
    return(fig)

app.run_server(mode='external', port = 8069, dev_tools_ui=True, #debug=True,
              dev_tools_hot_reload =True, threaded=True)

Original answer and suggestions

You haven't provided any sample code so I can only offer a general suggestion, and that is to take a closer look at how plotly streams forex data in an example in ther Dash gallery:

enter image description here

I would particularly take a look at how they've set up their callbacks and the function generate_figure_callback(pair) from line 932 in the source:

# Function to update Graph Figure
def generate_figure_callback(pair):
    def chart_fig_callback(n_i, p, t, s, pairs, a, b, old_fig):

        if pairs is None:
            return {"layout": {}, "data": {}}

        pairs = pairs.split(",")
        if pair not in pairs:
            return {"layout": {}, "data": []}

        if old_fig is None or old_fig == {"layout": {}, "data": {}}:
            return get_fig(pair, a, b, t, s, p)

        fig = get_fig(pair, a, b, t, s, p)
        return fig

    return chart_fig_callback

This is all I have for now, but I hope you'll find it useful!

Edit: Just to show that updates are not limited to 5 minutes.

Screen capture at 21:16:29

enter image description here

Screen capture at 21:16:55

enter image description here

What you see in the bid/ask text are just that: bids and offfers. And they change all the time. If I'm 100% right, the line represents closed deals, and that only occurs from time to time. So I think this is only a matter of what data you are displaying here. And I hope the only thing you'll have to do to get what you're after is to replace central parts of this example with your data source. You could also check out the Wind Streaming example. This might even be even easier to implement for your scenario.

enter image description here

6
  • That's a nice demo, thanks. Though it's only running on 5 minute intervals, so it's not going to run into real time performance issues and doesn't need to maintain seamless scrolling. Aug 31 '20 at 20:56
  • 1
    @DavidParks It's actually not only running on 5 minute intervals. I can see why you'd think so though due to the dropdown menu with the [5, 15, 30] options. But those are only to select the time intervals for the candle sticks. Try changing the plot to line by clicking the icon to the very right of EURUSD. Now you'll see that it updates all the time. It's not a perfectly continuous stream, but it's not very far from updating every two seconds or so. I'll see if I can throw in a few screenshots to better illustrate this.
    – vestland
    Aug 31 '20 at 21:12
  • Ah, you're right, the real-time update is changing the bid/ask text, but not a continuously scrolling graph which is the crux for us. Aug 31 '20 at 21:15
  • @DavidParks I made an edit with some points that hopefully shed some light on what's going on in that app.
    – vestland
    Aug 31 '20 at 21:28
  • 1
    @emher Thanks for the feedback! And yeah, I know. That's why I specifically mentioned that as a possible area for improvement.
    – vestland
    Sep 1 '20 at 19:34

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