75

I have to detect if a user has clicked back button or not. For this I am using

window.onbeforeunload = function (e) {
}

It works if a user clicks back button. But this event is also fired if a user click F5 or reload button of browser. How do I fix this?

3
66

So as far as AJAX is concerned...

Pressing back while using most web-apps that use AJAX to navigate specific parts of a page is a HUGE issue. I don't accept that 'having to disable the button means you're doing something wrong' and in fact developers in different facets have long run into this problem. Here's my solution:

window.onload = function () {
    if (typeof history.pushState === "function") {
        history.pushState("jibberish", null, null);
        window.onpopstate = function () {
            history.pushState('newjibberish', null, null);
            // Handle the back (or forward) buttons here
            // Will NOT handle refresh, use onbeforeunload for this.
        };
    }
    else {
        var ignoreHashChange = true;
        window.onhashchange = function () {
            if (!ignoreHashChange) {
                ignoreHashChange = true;
                window.location.hash = Math.random();
                // Detect and redirect change here
                // Works in older FF and IE9
                // * it does mess with your hash symbol (anchor?) pound sign
                // delimiter on the end of the URL
            }
            else {
                ignoreHashChange = false;   
            }
        };
    }
}

As far as Ive been able to tell this works across chrome, firefox, haven't tested IE yet.

12
  • This uses the History API not supported everywhere. You can add a shim though, but you'd have to change a little bit your code. – Florian Margaine Apr 7 '12 at 1:13
  • 1
    You're totally right. I looked it up and I can get older FF and IE working with this model.. (edited above) Look at this guy's post: adequatelygood.com/2010/7/Saner-HTML5-History-Management – Gus Crawford Apr 7 '12 at 3:39
  • My solution is a bit too simple your link references a great cross-platform solution i beleive based on the same hashchange event. – Gus Crawford Apr 7 '12 at 3:52
  • 1
    1. You should add history.go(-2); inside the window.onpopstate event if you wish to only catch the event but keep the original back button behavior. 2. I think window.onhashchange would work only if URL contains "#" anchor – BornToCode Mar 8 '15 at 12:46
  • 1
    This would not be worked in IE9 if there is no hash in the address (onhashchange event never fire). Dont forget to add a default hash before register the event. – Wittaya Apr 24 '15 at 8:17
61

Please try this (if the browser does not support "onbeforeunload"):

jQuery(document).ready(function($) {

  if (window.history && window.history.pushState) {

    $(window).on('popstate', function() {
      var hashLocation = location.hash;
      var hashSplit = hashLocation.split("#!/");
      var hashName = hashSplit[1];

      if (hashName !== '') {
        var hash = window.location.hash;
        if (hash === '') {
          alert('Back button was pressed.');
        }
      }
    });

    window.history.pushState('forward', null, './#forward');
  }

});
5
  • The function window.history.pushState is a child / a method of the object window.history. Would it not suffice to test for the function only? – Oliver Schafeld Apr 11 '16 at 12:45
  • 1
    @OliverSchafeld testing window.history.pushState only (or first) could throw Cannot read property 'pushState' of undefined if the browser doesn't implement the history API. So the two tests are needed, in this particular order. – Nico Prat Apr 28 '16 at 14:21
  • @Nico Prat : Ah, of course, thanks. Testing for a nonexistent property like this !!window.history.madeupproperty results false. So I was guessingif(!!window.history.pushState) might do. Couldn't get my hands on an IE9 (caniuse.com/#feat=history) for proper testing. But simply checking !!window.notexistent.madeup throws 'Cannot read property...' error. So if (window.history && window.history.pushState) is truly required and in that order as well. – Oliver Schafeld May 7 '16 at 9:34
  • Works for me in Chrome, FF & IE11 – Greg Trevellick Jul 5 '17 at 14:10
  • 2
    Very usefull code, but, as @Portekoi pointed out, not block twice the back button. To achieve the full blocking feature, I added the last line window.history.pushState('forward', null, './#forward') after alert('...') row. This did the trick... no refresh or any noticiable effect on backbutton click. – Nowdeen Jul 10 '17 at 19:54
9

best way I know

         window.onbeforeunload = function (e) {
            var e = e || window.event;
            var msg = "Do you really want to leave this page?"

            // For IE and Firefox
            if (e) {
                e.returnValue = msg;
            }

            // For Safari / chrome
            return msg;
         };
3
  • 1
    This is not working in chrome. – Riz Dec 3 '16 at 12:38
  • 1
    This will not disable the back button as much as it blocks any browsing (back, forward, refreshing) and allows the user to stop it with a prompt that is out of your control. – Gus Crawford Mar 30 '17 at 16:56
  • This disables navigating away from the page - including closing the page, back, and forward and does not answer the question. – Danger Jun 12 '18 at 16:07
6

I'm detecting the back button by this way:

window.onload = function () {
if (typeof history.pushState === "function") {
    history.pushState("jibberish", null, null);
    window.onpopstate = function () {
        history.pushState('newjibberish', null, null);
        // Handle the back (or forward) buttons here
        // Will NOT handle refresh, use onbeforeunload for this.
    };
}

It works but I have to create a cookie in Chrome to detect that i'm in the page on first time because when i enter in the page without control by cookie, the browser do the back action without click in any back button.

if (typeof history.pushState === "function"){
history.pushState("jibberish", null, null); 
window.onpopstate = function () {
    if ( ((x=usera.indexOf("Chrome"))!=-1) && readCookie('cookieChrome')==null ) 
    {
        addCookie('cookieChrome',1, 1440);      
    } 
    else 
    {
        history.pushState('newjibberish', null, null);  
    }
};

}

AND VERY IMPORTANT, history.pushState("jibberish", null, null); duplicates the browser history.

Some one knows who can i fix it?

4

Since the back button is a function of the browser, it can be difficult to change the default functionality. There are some work arounds though. Take a look at this article:

http://www.irt.org/script/311.htm

Typically, the need to disable the back button is a good indicator of a programming issue/flaw. I would look for an alternative method like setting a session variable or a cookie that stores whether the form has already been submitted.

1
  • 13
    If you do anything remotely modern, the back button's default action is not appropriate. This is because the back button is a workaround for the impracticality of the web before ajax. – Morg. Oct 22 '13 at 11:59
3

I'm assuming that you're trying to deal with Ajax navigation and not trying to prevent your users from using the back button, which violates just about every tenet of UI development ever.

Here's some possible solutions: JQuery History Salajax A Better Ajax Back Button

4
  • No, actually i have a form and after submitting the form i am redirecting user to another page.SO , here i do not want to user to click back button and go to form page. – facebook Jun 15 '11 at 14:35
  • 3
    @ibh: Perhaps the Post/Redirect/Get (PRG) pattern suits your needs. – Marcel Korpel Jun 15 '11 at 14:44
  • 3
    Wouldn't it be easier if you just let them go to the page but upon clicking the button you set a variable (or a session, or cookie) that tells the app not to present the form any more? You could simply hide the form and offer another "thanks for already filling out the form page" Or, redirect automatically if that variable has been set. It would prevent them from navigating in the way that they originally came as well. – bpeterson76 Jun 15 '11 at 14:44
  • @ibh: Or send the form using Ajax (with a normal, non-JavaScript fallback), so you can let the form disappear after success, without adding a new page to the browser history. – Marcel Korpel Jun 15 '11 at 14:55

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