3

what's the best way to define a concept with a nested concept requirements for a data member of the type? Something along these lines:

template<typename T>
concept MyConcept = requires(T a) {    
    {a.something} -> std::integral;
};

This doesn't work because a.something is picked up as a reference (delctype((a.something))). The best I came up with that works is something like this that forces an rvalue:

constexpr auto copy = [](auto value) { return value; };

template<typename T>
concept MyConcept = requires(T a) {    
    {copy(a.something)} -> std::integral;
};

Do I have any better options?

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5

The downside of copy is that it can create false positives for you. A reference member will decay to a value. The only way to ensure the actual type of the member is analyzed, is to write an explicit nested requirement.

template<typename T>
concept MyConcept = requires(T a) {    
    requires std::integral<decltype(a.something)>;
};
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  • What about just template<typename T> concept MyConcept = std::is_integral_v<decltype( T().something )>;? Does the T() cause any issues or does this amount to the same? – non-user38741 Aug 29 at 13:54
  • 1
    @non-user38741 - It checks more than just the member access. You sneaked the ability to value initialize T into there (and being able to destroy the temporary, but that's less of an issue). std::declval was created to avoid the problem, but honestly, the requires expression syntax is just way more readable. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Aug 29 at 16:24
  • Right. Looking for the simplest version, what about leaving out the second requires?Seems fine to me. – non-user38741 Aug 29 at 16:50
  • 1
    @non-user38741 - Then it no longer checks that a.something is of an integral type. It doesn't verify the std::integral concept is satisfied. All if checks is that std::integral<decltype(a.something)> is a valid expression. So it will fail if T doesn't have something at all, but it will pass even if something is not an integer type. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Aug 29 at 16:53
  • Now, that's surprising, but right again, thanks. Always have to be on guard. – non-user38741 Aug 29 at 17:04
0

For cases like this, it'd be pretty easy to create a concept specifically for references to integral:

template<typename T>
concept integral_ref = std::is_reference_v<T> && std::integral<std::remove_reference_t<T>>;

You can then use integral_ref directly.

Indeed, you can even create generic a reference_trait that works for any unary, boolean type traits that expect object types:

template<typename T, template<typename> class Trait>
concept reference_trait = std::is_reference_v<T> && Trait<std::remove_reference_t<T>>::value;

template<typename T>
concept MyConcept = requires(T a) {    
    {a.something} -> reference_trait<std::is_integral>;
};
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  • In my case I really wanted to check it's a plain integral value. If I use your solution I won't distinguish between int something and int& something. – dcmm88 Aug 27 at 16:23
  • @dcmm88: Why should you care? If the user of your interface wants to have a reference member, why should that matter to you or any code you write with respect to your concept? Don't be so controlling over the user's implementation. – Nicol Bolas Aug 27 at 16:46
  • In my use case I need the struct to be trivially copyable. – dcmm88 Aug 27 at 16:53
  • @dcmm88: Then is_trivially_copyable_v should be part of your requirements at some point. And you would be stopping it, not because it has a reference member, but because it isn't trivially copyable. This would also catch other things that prevent trivial copyability. – Nicol Bolas Aug 27 at 16:55
  • Sure, in my own use case I do have the requirement of trivially copyable, but I didn't included in my question because originally I didn't think it's relevant. Still, you can see how your suggested solution would be a bit odd for my use case. Going through all the trouble to deal with references when I don't even want those to be allowed. – dcmm88 Aug 27 at 17:08

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