8

Consider the following code:

template <typename T>
struct S 
{
    template <typename = void>
    static constexpr bool B = true;

    template <std::enable_if_t<S<T>::template B<>, int> = 0>
    void f();
};

template <typename T>
template <std::enable_if_t<S<T>::template B<>, int>>
void S<T>::f() {}

gcc accepts this, but clang rejects it with:

error: out-of-line definition of 'f' does not match any declaration in 'S<T>'

This has been asked about before, but there is no answer there.


On the other hand, if B is not a template, and I write this code:

template <typename T>
struct S 
{
    static constexpr bool B = true;

    template <std::enable_if_t<S<T>::B, int> = 0>
    void f();
};

template <typename T>
template <std::enable_if_t<S<T>::B, int>>
void S<T>::f() {}

clang accepts this, but gcc rejects the code with:

error: no declaration matches 'void S<T>::f()'

So are either of these snippets valid?

1
  • Is it allowed to access S<T>::B. I would say no because S<T> is incomplete at that point. – Bernd Aug 29 '20 at 11:29
2

During the definition of S<X> it is an incomplete type. And the class member access operator requires a complete type.

But you could solve the situation with the following code:

#include <type_traits>

template <typename T>
struct S {

    template <typename = void>
    static constexpr bool B = true;

    template <
        typename TX = T,
        std::enable_if_t<S<TX>::template B<>, int> = 0>
    void f();
};

template <typename T>
template <typename TX, std::enable_if_t<S<TX>::template B<>, int>>
void S<T>::f() {}

//-----------

template <typename T>
struct S2 {

    static constexpr bool B = true;

    template <
        typename TX = T,
        std::enable_if_t<S2<TX>::B, int> = 0>
    void f();
};

template <typename T>
template <typename TX, std::enable_if_t<S2<TX>::B, int>>
void S2<T>::f() {}
5
  • So your claim is template <std::enable_if_t<S<T>::B, int> = 0> void f(); is the problem? Is it an ill-formed program, no diagnostic required, or are the compilers failing to provide a diagnostic? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 29 '20 at 12:52
  • Yes it is. But even if it would be allowed it would not work because the enable_if_t expression does not depend on a deduced type. If B would be false it would cause a compile time error (enable_if<...> has no member type...). – Bernd Aug 29 '20 at 14:06
  • 2
    Can you point out where in the standard it is defined as "ill-formed program, no diagnostic required"? (there are, I think, less than a dozen times that is invoked in the standard). I ask because this is a language-lawyer question. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 29 '20 at 15:11
  • I'm not sure that this is correct. S<TX> seems as incomplete or not, as S<T>. Regardless, could you point to the rules that say the snippets in the question are wrong? – cigien Sep 13 '20 at 18:08
  • 1
    If S<T>::B was the problem then this wouldn't compile. Yet, S<T>::B doesn't compile only out-of-class, when S is complete. Also inside S you can replace S<T>::B with B for the same effect. Anyway, the rules are pretty simple (see temp.type). Looks like a gcc bug to me. – rustyx May 1 at 14:57

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