116

Forgive me for this is a very simple script in Bash. Here's the code:

#!/bin/bash
# june 2011

if [ $# -lt 3 -o $# -gt 3 ]; then
   echo "Error... Usage: $0 host database username"
   exit 0
fi

after running sh file.sh:

syntax error: unexpected end of file

0

19 Answers 19

156

I think file.sh is with CRLF line terminators.

run

dos2unix file.sh

then the problem will be fixed.

You can install dos2unix in ubuntu with this:

sudo apt-get install dos2unix
7
  • Whats the reason behind this problem? I usually work on Windows but need to transfer scripts to unix systems. – CMCDragonkai Nov 2 '13 at 16:06
  • Newline in windows is "\r\n", while in linux is "\n". – clyfish Nov 4 '13 at 3:12
  • 8
    @KeesdeKooter I wouldn't say just because something didn't work for you that you should downvote it, clearly it worked for the 28 upvotes. A simple it didn't work for me suffices. That's why SO allowed multiple answers to a question because there can be multiple solutions to a problem. – Jeff Wilbert Jul 27 '15 at 15:33
  • 2
    Using notepad++ editor Edit>EOL Conversion>Old Mac Format solved it for me. – raktale Jan 22 '16 at 12:15
  • 1
    Before installing maybe try (in vim) ':set fileformat=unix'. This worked for me in the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). – Jay Killeen Mar 12 '18 at 1:23
145

Another thing to check (just occured to me):

  • terminate bodies of single-line functions with semicolon

I.e. this innocent-looking snippet will cause the same error:

die () { test -n "$@" && echo "$@"; exit 1 }

To make the dumb parser happy:

die () { test -n "$@" && echo "$@"; exit 1; }
3
  • 6
    +1 Also applies to code snippets with brackets like so: [[ "$#" == 1 ]] && [[ "$arg" == [1,2,3,4] ]] && printf "%s\n" "blah" || { printf "%s\n" "blahblah"; usage; } ............ Note that semicolon inside the squiggly brackets, just after calling some previously defined function 'usage'. Forgetting that will get you the same syntax error: unexpected eof. – Cbhihe Jun 19 '15 at 8:45
  • you nailed it. Actually the simple thing is the ; Every statement is being expected to end with ; so put that at the end eg: if [ -f ~/.git-completion.bash ]; then . ~/.git-completion.bash fi will produce that error, whereas if [ -f ~/.git-completion.bash ]; then . ~/.git-completion.bash; fi; will not... notice the little semi-colons at the end, ie: after .bash and fi. – Emmanuel Mahuni Aug 27 '18 at 7:51
  • 1
    I had this in a script shared with me from a zsh user. The former does work in zsh but not in sh nor bash. Wish I was 4 people so I could give this 4 upvotes – Davos Jan 4 '19 at 0:41
51

i also just got this error message by using the wrong syntax in an if clause

  • else if (syntax error: unexpected end of file)
  • elif (correct syntax)

i debugged it by commenting bits out until it worked

1
  • Thank you soo much.. someone please give this guy a medal – Happiehappie Mar 25 '20 at 1:14
24

an un-closed if => fi clause will raise this as well

tip: use trap to debug, if your script is huge...

e.g.

set -x
trap read debug
3
  • 1
    I exactly forgot the "fi"! Thanks :) If you could, for the benefit of everyone, elaborate a bit on your tip of using trap. – Carles Alcolea Oct 25 '17 at 21:38
  • 3
    sorry for the delay, my friend. 'the 'trap' command is a way to debug your scripts by esentially breaking after every line. a fuller discussion is here: stackoverflow.com/questions/9080431/… – theRiley Dec 13 '17 at 1:14
  • 1
    That was useful thanks a lot. Note that the unexpected end of file error will occur as soon as the fi is hit. – Stephane B. May 19 '18 at 19:53
10

I got this answer from this similar problem on StackOverflow

Open the file in Vim and try

:set fileformat=unix

Convert eh line endings to unix endings and see if that solves the issue. If editing in Vim, enter the command :set fileformat=unix and save the file. Several other editors have the ability to convert line endings, such as Notepad++ or Atom

Thanks @lemongrassnginger

1
  • These are just alternative ways to do dos2unix as the accepted answer advises. – ulidtko Nov 19 '19 at 10:05
10

I had the problem when I wrote "if - fi" statement in one line:

if [ -f ~/.git-completion.bash ]; then . ~/.git-completion.bash fi

Write multiline solved my problem:

if [ -f ~/.git-completion.bash ]; then 
    . ~/.git-completion.bash
 fi
1
  • 1
    You can also keep it as one line like this: if [ -f ~/.git-completion.bash ]; then . ~/.git-completion.bash; fi (note the ; near the end). – YorSubs Jan 29 at 16:09
7

on cygwin I needed:-

 export SHELLOPTS
 set -o igncr

in .bash_profile . This way I didn't need to run unix2dos

0
7

So I found this post and the answers did not help me but i was able to figure out why it gave me the error. I had a

cat > temp.txt < EOF
some content
EOF

The issue was that i copied the above code to be in a function and inadvertently tabbed the code. Need to make sure the last EOF is not tabbed.

1
  • 2
    This was exactly my case. I had EOF indented by four spaces and bash didn't parse it because of that. Removing spaces fixed the issue. – aexl Nov 13 '16 at 12:56
5

This was happening for me when I was trying to call a function using parens, e.g.

run() {
  echo hello
}

run()

should be:

run() {
  echo hello
}

run
0
3

Missing a closing brace on a function definition will cause this error as I just discovered.

function whoIsAnIidiot() {
    echo "you are for forgetting the closing brace just below this line !"

Which of course should be like this...

function whoIsAnIidiot() {
    echo "not you for sure"
}
2

FOR WINDOWS:

In my case, I was working on Windows OS and I got the same error while running autoconf.

  • I simply open configure.ac file with my NOTEPAD++ IDE.
  • Then I converted the File with EOL conversion into Windows (CR LF) as follows:

    EDIT -> EOL CONVERSION -> WINDOWS (CR LF)

2

In my case, there is a redundant \ in the like following:

function foo() {
    python tools/run_net.py \
                           --cfg configs/Kinetics/X3D_8x8_R50.yaml \
                           NUM_GPUS 1 \
                           TRAIN.BATCH_SIZE 8 \
                           SOLVER.BASE_LR 0.0125 \
                           DATA.PATH_TO_DATA_DIR ./afs/kinetics400 \
                           DATA.PATH_PREFIX  ./afs/kinetics400  \  # Error
}

There is NOT a \ at the end of DATA.PATH_PREFIX ./afs/kinetics400

1

I was able to cut and paste your code into a file and it ran correctly. If you execute it like this it should work:

Your "file.sh":

#!/bin/bash
# june 2011

if [ $# -lt 3 -o $# -gt 3 ]; then
   echo "Error... Usage: $0 host database username"
   exit 0
fi

The command:

$ ./file.sh arg1 arg2 arg3

Note that "file.sh" must be executable:

$ chmod +x file.sh

You may be getting that error b/c of how you're doing input (w/ a pipe, carrot, etc.). You could also try splitting the condition into two:

if [ $# -lt 3 ] || [ $# -gt 3 ]; then
   echo "Error... Usage: $0 host database username"
   exit 0
fi

Or, since you're using bash, you could use built-in syntax:

if [[ $# -lt 3 || $# -gt 3 ]]; then
   echo "Error... Usage: $0 host database username"
   exit 0
fi

And, finally, you could of course just check if 3 arguments were given (clean, maintains POSIX shell compatibility):

if [ $# -ne 3 ]; then
   echo "Error... Usage: $0 host database username"
   exit 0
fi
2
  • i still got the same error. im not exactly sure where the code goes wrong – markcruz Jun 16 '11 at 2:43
  • weird, i cut and pasted your code and it worked as expected. was there any more error output? a lot of time bash will list a line number. also, what system are you running? (Linux, MacOS, BSD, distro, etc) – aaronstacy Jun 16 '11 at 2:47
0

I just cut-and-pasted your example into a file; it ran fine under bash. I don't see any problems with it.

For good measure you may want to ensure it ends with a newline, though bash shouldn't care. (It runs for me both with and without the final newline.)

You'll sometimes see strange errors if you've accidentally embedded a control character in the file. Since it's a short script, try creating a new script by pasting it from your question here on StackOverflow, or by simply re-typing it.

What version of bash are you using? (bash --version)

Good luck!

0

Make sure the name of the directory in which the .sh file is present does not have a space character. e.g: Say if it is in a folder called 'New Folder', you're bound to come across the error that you've cited. Instead just name it as 'New_Folder'. I hope this helps.

0

Apparently, some versions of the shell can also emit this message when the final line of your script lacks a newline.

0

In Ubuntu:

$ gedit ~/.profile

Then, File -> Save as and set end line to Unix/Linux

0

I know I am too late to the party. Hope this may help someone.

Check your .bashrc file. Perhaps rename or move it.

Discussion here: Unable to source a simple bash script

0

For people using MacOS:

If you received a file with Windows format and wanted to run on MacOS and seeing this error, run these commands.

brew install dos2unix
sh <file.sh>

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