10

I need to do something like the following

e = []
m = []
p = []
t = []
...and so on for about 10 different arrays

Is there a way to create all these arrays on one line?

20

You can do it using the following:

e,m,p,t... = Array.new(10) { [] }

It turns out

[[]]*10

is not the right way to go, [[]]*10 is for repetition and is just repeating the same object [] 10 times, so all the variables would end up getting assigned to the same object.

  • 2
    The first solution is good (though you can just do Array.new(10) { [] }). However, your second solution has a gotcha. If one of the variables gets modified (eg e << "foo"), then m,p,t etc. get modified as well. – Andrew Grimm Jun 16 '11 at 7:14
  • @Andrew Grimm Yea that's how I started actually, I thought why not just [] instead of Array.new within the block, and then went on to trying to remove the first Array.new as well. But this is weird! I just confirmed what you said, can you perhaps explain why that is the case ? – Dhruva Sagar Jun 16 '11 at 7:18
  • @Dhruva: It's the same array referred to 10 times, rather than 10 distinct arrays. You can find that out by calling object_id on the object. – Andrew Grimm Jun 16 '11 at 7:24
  • @Dhruva: I had a look at the RDoc, and it doesn't make explicitly clear the danger of [[]]*10 (or Array.new(10, [])). – Andrew Grimm Jun 16 '11 at 7:36
  • @Andrew Grimm that is really strange, I am checking with guys @ irc – Dhruva Sagar Jun 16 '11 at 8:33
6

Like multiple variable declaration in one line a1, a2, a3 = 3, 10, 4

e, m, p, t ... = [], [], [], [] ...
5

What all fails

>  p, q, r = v = Array.new(3, [])
 => [[], [], []] 
>  v.map(&:object_id)
 => [70155104393020, 70155104393020, 70155104393020] 
>  p = q = r = []
 => [] 
>  [p, q, r].map(&:object_id)
 => [70155104367380, 70155104367380, 70155104367380] 

What works

>  p, q, r = v = Array.new(3){ [] }
 => [[], [], []] 
>  v.map(&:object_id)
 => [70155104731780, 70155104731760, 70155104731740] 
4

I'm curious at what are those 10 different arrays, because I would suspect they shouldn't be 10 different variables but just one. You don't give any context, so I can only guess, something like the following might better:

whatever = Hash.new{|h, k| h[k] = []}
whatever[:e] # => []
whatever[:m] << 42
whatever[:m] # => [42]
# etc...

Otherwise, as zomboid wrote:

e, m, p, t ... = [], [], [], [] ...
  • Interesting point! They are actually 10 different variables in this case because they are used for completely separate purposes. Thanks for that alternative approach. +1 – sscirrus Jun 16 '11 at 6:21

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