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I am taking multiple screenshots of a view with an animated GIF and then convert the array of screenshots to a video. Although it works sometimes, I often get the error Terminated due to memory issue. Therefore, I am looking for a way that is less heavy on the memory.

Current code

func setUpGIF(postStory: Bool){
    print("setUpGIF \(limit)")
    var frameCount: Int = 0
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.storySize, self.canvasView.isOpaque, 0.0)
    self.canvasView.drawHierarchy(in: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: self.storySize.width, height: self.storySize.height), afterScreenUpdates: false)
    let snapshotImageFromMyView = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
    gifStoryPreview = snapshotImageFromMyView
    while frameCount != limit {
        autoreleasepool {
            frameCount = frameCount + 1
            UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.storySize, self.canvasView.isOpaque, 0.0)
            self.canvasView.drawHierarchy(in: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: self.storySize.width, height: self.storySize.height), afterScreenUpdates: false)
            let snapshotImageFromMyView = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
            UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
            gifImageArray.append(snapshotImageFromMyView!)
        }
    }
    autoreleasepool {
        writeImagesAsMovie(postStory: postStory, allImages: gifImageArray)
    }
}

1 Answer 1

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I'm not sure of the memory impact from creating and ending all of those graphic contexts, but the most obvious cause of excessive memory use here is that you're accumulating a bunch of potentially large images in an array. All of those images are in memory at the same time, so depending on how many there are and how big they are, you may be using a lot of memory just to hold them.

You might consider writing the images to temporary files as soon as you create them, and keep only the file names in an array. That would avoid keeping all of the images in memory at the same time but still keep them available. Then when you call writeImagesAsMovie, you can use the files one by one, again making sure to avoid loading all of the images at once.

For other possibilities you'll need to profile your code and see exactly where the memory is being used. If you put a breakpoint at the start of this code, you can step through it one line at a time. If you compare that to what you see in Xcode's debug navigator, you can see exactly which lines of code cause the extra memory use. It might go up and down, so don't assume the first spike is necessarily the problem. Keep going to get a sense of where the memory use goes up and stays up.

Selecting the memory section of Xcode's debug navigator

If that doesn't help, using Instruments probably will. Learning Instruments is more than can easily be covered in a Stack Overflow answer, but it's a useful skill, not just in this case.

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  • Perfect logic! Thank you!
    – Dekple
    Sep 3, 2020 at 0:29

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