1

I have the following task:

match all lines which end with a number and then reverse these numbers

example:

romarana:qwerty12543
asdewfpwk:asdqwe312
asdj:asbd
asdewfpwk:strwtwe129
ooasodo:asbdjahj

should be:

romarana:qwerty34521
asdj:asbd
asdewfpwk:asdqwe213
asdewfpwk:strwtwe921
ooasodo:asbdjahj

What I tried:

sed -r "/[0-9]$/s/[0-9]{1,}$/$(rev <<< &)/" test.txt

NOTE: you can ignore lines that don't end with the number for now.

NOTE: You can use awk,grep or any other tool

5
  • 1
    It's not possible for the command substitution to refer to sed expressions. It's executed before sed runs.
    – Barmar
    Sep 1, 2020 at 5:43
  • 1
    This seems an awful lot like homework. I can't believe this is a real-world task.
    – Barmar
    Sep 1, 2020 at 5:45
  • Thanks for your answer. What do you think is it possible to achieve my goal, even if I chain multiple tools together
    – walt
    Sep 1, 2020 at 5:47
  • 1
    In Ruby it would be simply str.gsub(/\d+(?=$)/) { |s| s.reverse }, which could be executed from the command line, and which no doubt is very similar to how it could be done in PHP, Python and other languages. Sep 1, 2020 at 5:56
  • 1
    with GNU sed you can do sed -E 's/([^0-9]*)([0-9]+)$/echo \1$(echo \2 | rev)/e' but it assumes no other digits in the line and is not a robust solution, for example, single quotes in the input text will cause an error
    – Sundeep
    Sep 1, 2020 at 7:14

5 Answers 5

6

With perl

$ perl -pe 's/\d+$/reverse $&/e' ip.txt
romarana:qwerty34521
asdewfpwk:asdqwe213
asdj:asbd
asdewfpwk:strwtwe921
ooasodo:asbdjahj

The e modifier allows to use Perl code in replacement section. $& contains the matched portion.

2
  • 2
    This is great solution, learnt something new today. May be you could add this in your tutorial site :) if not added already Sep 1, 2020 at 11:14
  • 1
    It is there in perl one-liners
    – Sundeep
    Sep 1, 2020 at 12:20
2

This can also be done with sed alone, by inserting a separator character (let's take the number sign) before the number and then repeatedly moving the line's last digit before the separator:

sed 's/\([0-9]*\)$/#\1/;:b;s/#\([0-9]*\)\([0-9]\)$/\2#\1/;tb;s/#$//'
3
  • 1
    With sed when trying to come up with a magic character that can't be present in the input it's best to use \n (as a starting point at least) since by default that cannot be present in the line that sed is working on. If you pick # or some other character it's just a matter of time before that does show up in the input.
    – Ed Morton
    Sep 1, 2020 at 13:55
  • @Ed Morton - My suggestion works independently of the separator character being present elsewhere in the input line.
    – Armali
    Sep 2, 2020 at 5:44
  • That's fine, I've no idea what the characters in that script are actually doing individually or collectively so I'll take your word for it, but my comment still stands that \n is the best character to use when you're injecting one into a string to match on later.
    – Ed Morton
    Sep 2, 2020 at 15:42
2

You can do this with an awk command, as in the following bash script:

#!/usr/bin/env sh

(   echo romarana:qwerty12543
    echo asdewfpwk:asdqwe312
    echo asdj:asbd
    echo asdewfpwk:strwtwe129
    echo ooasodo:asbdjahj ) | awk '
        /[0-9]+$/ {                             # Lines ending in digits.
            num = txt = $0                      # Divide into text and num.
            gsub("[0-9]+$", "", txt)
            num = substr(num, length(txt)+1)

            revnum = ""                         # Build reversed number bit.
            while (num != "") {
                revnum = substr(num, 1, 1)""revnum
                num = substr(num, 2)
            }

            print txt""revnum" (from "$0")"     # Output text, reversed num.
            next
        }
        { print }                               # Not digits at end.
    '

It's pretty verbose, and could probably be reduced, but it does the job (you can get rid of the from output, that's just there so you can see it's working):

pax:~> ./testprog.sh
romarana:qwerty34521 (from romarana:qwerty12543)
asdewfpwk:asdqwe213 (from asdewfpwk:asdqwe312)
asdj:asbd
asdewfpwk:strwtwe921 (from asdewfpwk:strwtwe129)
ooasodo:asbdjahj
0
2

With GNU awk could you please try following.

awk '
match($0,/[0-9]+$/,a){
  num=split(a[0],arr,"")
  for(i=num;i>0;i--){
    val=val arr[i]
  }
  print substr($0,1,RSTART-1) val
  val=""
  next
}
1
' Input_file

Output will be as follows.

romarana:qwerty34521
asdewfpwk:asdqwe213
asdj:asbd
asdewfpwk:strwtwe921
ooasodo:asbdjahj
2

With GNU awk for the 3rd arg to match() and null FS splitting $0 into chars:

$ awk -v FS= 'match($0,/(.*[^0-9])([0-9]+)$/,a) {
    $0=a[2]; for (i=NF;i>=1;i--) a[1]=a[1] $i; $0=a[1]
} 1' file
romarana:qwerty34521
asdewfpwk:asdqwe213
asdj:asbd
asdewfpwk:strwtwe921
ooasodo:asbdjahj

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