140

This is the new error that is coming in typescript code.

I am not able to realize the logic behind it
Documentation

/*When using the delete operator in strictNullChecks, 
the operand must now be any, unknown, never, or be optional 
(in that it contains undefined in the type). Otherwise, use of the delete operator is an error.*/

interface Thing {
  prop: string;
}

function f(x: Thing) {
  delete x.prop; // throws error = The operand of a 'delete' operator must be optional.
}
1
  • 1
    Your question includes the answer... When using the delete operator in strictNullChecks, the operand must now be any, unknown, never, or be optional Sep 2, 2020 at 8:58

6 Answers 6

149

I am not able to realize the logic behind it

The logic as I understand is the following:

Interface Thing is a contract asking to have a (non-null, non-undefined) prop as a string.

If one removes the property, then the contract is not implemented anymore.

If you want it still valid when removed, just declare it as optional with a ?: prop?: string

I'm actually surprised that this was not causing error in earlier versions of TypeScript.

8
  • 4
    This is a false positive in a case where you are using React and want to pass props to a component, but do not want to pass all the props to HTML DOM element as they are not valid and you are using a spread operator to allow consumer to pass all native HTML attributes. Then you make a copy of the props and delete the unnecessary props. Dec 17, 2020 at 17:29
  • 1
    holy cow @toni_lehtimaki that is my EXACT situation... :) Jun 22, 2021 at 3:38
  • It's also a false positive in cases where the prototype chain still includes the property - because the delete statement only works on direct properties, and not on inherited properties. You can do for example delete node.getAttribute on an Element and everything is fine - you may have deleted a property that was hiding the inherited property, but it still inherits getAttribute from the prototype. Oct 26, 2021 at 8:44
  • 1
    @aProgger At first sight I'd say some "clean" approach would be to have two types, the one with all the data, and a "light" version of it. May deserve it's own question with more details, though.
    – Pac0
    Nov 22, 2021 at 19:57
  • 1
    @Pac0 had the same idea and already implemented it. I made a (super-)class function which collects all the data and returns them as the new type.
    – aProgger
    Nov 23, 2021 at 10:18
81

The logic behind of this, is that you need to implement your interface with an optional property like this:

interface Thing {
  prop?: string;
}
// OR
interface Thing {
  prop: string | undefined;
}

function f(x: Thing) {
  delete x.prop; 
}

So the interface's contract won't be broken.

0
10

You could change the type of x to a partial:

function f(x: Partial<Thing>) {
  delete x.prop;
}

But I don't usually like to mutate (modify) objects which have been passed to me from possibly unknown code. So I would usually make a new object instead:

function f(x: Thing) {
  const y = { ...x } as Partial<Thing>;
  delete y.prop;
}

Since Partial makes all the properties optional, this will allow you to delete anything from y.

Recommended

To be more specific, you could use PartialBy (one liner) or SetOptional (from type-fest):

  const y = { ...x } as PartialBy<Thing, 'prop1' | 'prop2'>;

That would make prop1 and prop2 optional but keep all other properties mandatory (required).

9

Another implementation if you want it to exist:

interface Thing {
  prop: string;
}
interface PropoptionalThing {
  prop?: string;
}

function f(x: Thing): PropoptionalThing {
  let tmp: PropoptionalThing = x;
  delete tmp.prop;
  return tmp;
}
5

Maybe this can helpful

const { propToDelete, ...otherProps} = youObject
return otherProps

with that you can use otherProps object without break out

2

The prop property in Thing interface must be mark as optional using ? mark.

then your Thing interface must be like this.

interface Thing {
  prop?: string;
}

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