34

I have read somewhere that the C++ standard does not allow something like enum an_enum { a, b, c, };, while later versions of C (I think from mid-90s) do allow such declarations with trailing commas. If C++ is supposed to have backwards compatibility with C, how come this feature is forbidden? Any special reason?

I also read that such trailing commas are actually good, so that just adds to the confusion.

  • 6
    Trailing commas are good for the lazy programmer. And laziness is good :) – pmg Jun 16 '11 at 13:39
  • 3
    Trailing commas as especially good if you have one value per line as it makes all lines similar, very useful for computer (or macro) generated values. – chqrlie Jan 31 '17 at 8:03
  • Easy to auto-generate code by printing a, b, c, in a for loop without needing to somehow handle the last case separately like in a, b, c. – Olli Niemitalo Jun 1 at 3:49
61

C++03 (which is a fairly minor update of C++98) bases its C compatibility on C89 (also known as C90, depending on whether you're ANSI or ISO). C89 doesn't allow the trailing comma. C99 does allow it. C++11 does allow it (7.2/1 has the grammar for an enum declaration).

In fact C++ isn't entirely backward-compatible even with C89, although this is the kind of thing that if had it been in C89, you'd expect C++ to permit it.

The key advantage to me of the trailing comma is when you write this:

enum Channel {
    RED,
    GREEN,
    BLUE,
};

and then later change it to this:

enum Channel {
    RED,
    GREEN,
    BLUE,
    ALPHA,
};

It's nice that only one line is changed when you diff the versions. To get the same effect when there's no trailing comma allowed, you could write:

enum Channel {
    RED
   ,GREEN
   ,BLUE
};

But (a) that's crazy talk, and (b) it doesn't help in the (admittedly rare) case that you want to add the new value at the beginning.

  • There's a school of thought that states: if you can't handle a two-line diff as easily as a one-line diff, you've no business running diffs :-) – paxdiablo Jan 31 '17 at 7:19
  • I use the "crazy talk" version , but with the comma at the start of the line and then the tab. It does cause multi-line diff if you add a new value at the start, but that's relatively rare. – M.M Jan 31 '17 at 7:33
  • 3
    ,GREEN looks like a lisp macro replacement... ;-) – chqrlie Jan 31 '17 at 8:06
6

Looking at the latest draft for C++0x it looks like you can use trailing commas:

enum-specifier:
enum-head { enumerator-list opt}
enum-head { enumerator-list , }

enumerator-list:
enumerator-definition
enumerator-list , enumerator-definition
1

For one thing, the last C standard was in 1999. The last (complete) C++ standard was 98 (2003 was an update). After that, not all of C99 is going into C++11.

1

Trailing comma in enum was introduced in C99 as a feature. It does not exist in C90 nor C++ versions that were based on a pre-C99 baseline.

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