2

I am seeing inconsistent signaling between two threads with the posix pthread/signaling api.

Here is my test program

#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void *thr_fn(void *arg)
{
    int err, signo;
    sigset_t    mask;

   sigemptyset(&mask);
   sigaddset(&mask,SIGUSR1);
   sigaddset(&mask,SIGUSR2);
   sigaddset(&mask,SIGABRT);

    printf("Thread Checker\n");
    
    while(1) {
        err = sigwait(&mask, &signo);
        if (err != 0)
        {
            printf("sigwait failed %d\n",err);
            exit(1);
        }
        
        switch(signo)
        {
            case SIGUSR1:
                printf("SIGUSR1\n");
                break;
            case SIGUSR2:
                printf("SIGUSR2\n");
                break;
            case SIGABRT:
                printf("SIGABRT\n");
                break;
            default:
                printf("Signal %d\n",signo);
                break;
        }
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    int         err;
    pthread_t   tid;
    sigset_t mask;
    
    sigemptyset(&mask);
    sigaddset(&mask,SIGUSR1);
    sigaddset(&mask,SIGUSR2);
    sigaddset(&mask,SIGABRT);
    pthread_sigmask(SIG_BLOCK,&mask,NULL);
    
    err = pthread_create(&tid, NULL, thr_fn, 0);
    if (err != 0)
    {
        printf("can't create thread %d",err);
        exit(1);
    }

    sleep(1);

    for(int x=0;x<5;x++)
    {
        printf("set %d\n",x);
        usleep(100000);
        // raise(SIGUSR1);
        pthread_kill(tid, SIGUSR1);
        pthread_kill(tid, SIGUSR2);
        pthread_kill(tid, SIGABRT);
        usleep(500000);
        printf("\n");
    }
    
    printf("Done\n");
    exit(0);    
}

What I expect to see is 5 groups of identified signals similar to below:

set 1
SIGUSR1
SIGUSR2
SIGABRT

I expect to see 1 representative for each signal but I suppose it is not reasonable to expect the signals to be in order.

$ cc -pthread main.c
$ ./a.out
Thread Checker
set 0
SIGUSR1
SIGABRT
SIGUSR2

set 1
SIGUSR2
SIGABRT
SIGUSR2

set 2
SIGUSR1
SIGABRT
SIGUSR2

set 3
SIGUSR1
SIGABRT
SIGUSR2

set 4
SIGUSR1
SIGABRT
SIGUSR2

Done
Program ended with exit code: 0

Note that set 1 has 2 SIGUSR2's in it. Each time I run the program I frequently a different number of signals. Using the commented out raise(SIGUSR1) in place of pthread_kill(tid,SIGUSR1) does not help.

So the questions is what is happening with SIGWAIT? Why is it possible to for signals to change type, or get duplicated in the signal queue. Why is this not consistent behavior? We see this work 100% in Linux but it also behaves badly in WSL.

3
  • I tested that on my MacOS running Mojave and compiling with clang version 11.0.0 and I actually got Signal 0 in the first set there, I also see duplicate SIGUSR1 but SIGABRT seems to work pretty consistently - weird.
    – Cobusve
    Sep 3, 2020 at 20:13
  • I wonder if OS X threads use SIGUSRn signals for things like the old LinuxThreads implementation did?
    – Shawn
    Sep 3, 2020 at 20:19
  • We have also been seeing signal 0 in the first set. That is very strange as it is not in the SIGxxx list. Sep 3, 2020 at 21:48

2 Answers 2

2

I added:

void dummy(int sig) {
    dprintf(1, "Dummy %d\n", sig);
}

and:

signal(SIGUSR1, dummy);
signal(SIGUSR2, dummy);
signal(SIGABRT, dummy);

near the top of main; and it works as expected, and dummy is never invoked. In man sigwait:

The signals specified by set should be blocked, but not ignored, at the time of the call to sigwait().

update: if you change this to fork into thr_fn instead of pthread_create, it works without establishing the dummy params; which leads to a hypothoguess: macos diddles the SIG_DFL when a thread is created. This isn't inconsistent with the mess that pthreads+signals are. If you are planning to use both of these paradigms, you might want to hit pause....

3
  • I will give this a try. To be clear, registering the signal handler ensures the signal is not ignored, per the man page? We are using the signals and pthreads to write a RTOS simulation. This maps somewhat well with pthreads and is very different with fork. Sep 5, 2020 at 13:30
  • I was able to add a signal handler and then block all the signals. The sigwait still occasionally produces strange results. Sep 8, 2020 at 20:47
  • I used signal near the beginning of main, as you show, instead of sigaction and it seems to be working correctly. Sep 8, 2020 at 21:01
0

My best guess is that you're running the program under debugger on macOS when you observe the odd behavior. Try running it directly from terminal without debugger.

1
  • Sadly, we tested on the terminal and saw the incorrect behavior. Sep 5, 2020 at 13:29

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