0
/* --- PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY macro's --- */
#define PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT8 " %c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c"
#define PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT8(i)    \
    (((i) & 0x80ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x40ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x20ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x10ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x08ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x04ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x02ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x01ll) ? '1' : '0')

#define PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT16 \
    PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT8              PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT8
#define PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT16(i) \
    PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT8((i) >> 8),   PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT8(i)
#define PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT32 \
    PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT16             PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT16
#define PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT32(i) \
    PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT16((i) >> 16), PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT16(i)
#define PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT64    \
    PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT32             PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT32
#define PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT64(i) \
    PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT32((i) >> 32), PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT32(i)
/* --- end macros --- */

I got the above code from BitField.cpp.

When I use the cc compiler to compile the code, I got the following warning.

warning: shift count >= width of type [-Wshift-count-overflow] PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT64(n));

The warning is generated from " PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT32((i) >> 32), PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT32(i)". If you change ">> 32" to ">> 31" or any number less than 32, the warning disappears. However, I need to right shift 32 bits and the result is correct. Just the warning is quite annoying. I wonder that there may be some way to fix the codes so that the warning will go away.

Any idea to circumvent this warning besides turning off and ignoring the warning?

3
  • What about casting i to an appropriate 64-bit type? Sep 3 '20 at 23:44
  • The warning is probably accurate and the code probably really is incorrect. What’s the type of n?
    – Ry-
    Sep 3 '20 at 23:59
  • As PJ suggested, casting to appropriate type will get rid of the warning. Adding my two cents, I would suggest to cast to uint64_t if you don't care about signed or unsigned value. Using uint64_t will give you the raw binary pattern.
    – Tony
    Sep 4 '20 at 1:08
1

Simply add casts. It will make this macro even worse than it is.

/* --- PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY macro's --- */

#define PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT8 " %c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c"
#define PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT8(i)    \
    (((i) & 0x80ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x40ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x20ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x10ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x08ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x04ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x02ll) ? '1' : '0'), \
    (((i) & 0x01ll) ? '1' : '0')

#define PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT16 \
    PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT8              PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT8
#define PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT16(i) \
    PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT8((int16_t)(i) >> 8),   PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT8(i)
#define PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT32 \
    PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT16             PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT16
#define PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT32(i) \
    PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT16((int32_t)(i) >> 16), PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT16(i)
#define PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT64    \
    PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT32             PRINTF_BINARY_PATTERN_INT32
#define PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT64(i) \
    PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT32((int64_t)(i) >> 32), PRINTF_BYTE_TO_BINARY_INT32(i)
1
  • Doing shifts on potentially negative numbers is a bad idea. This might end up as arithmetic or logical shift and you can't portably tell which one applies. Cast to unsigned types if anything.
    – Lundin
    Sep 4 '20 at 9:10
0

These macros have the following problems:

  • They are doing shift on signed types. A signed type may hold negative values and then the result of right shift is implementation-defined: it could either be arithmetic or logical shift depending on compiler. Always use unsigned types when working with raw binary.
  • It doesn't make sense to shift a 32 bit type 32 bits or more, hence the warning. This is formally an undefined behavior bug - the C standard says "If the value of the right operand is negative or is greater than or equal to the width of the promoted left operand, the behavior is undefined."
  • The macros are inefficient like anything, since it boils down to 8 branches of ?: checking, for something that could be pre-computed in compile time. It isn't necessary to print this character-by-character.
  • The macros have non-existent type safety, like any old C macro.

For fixing the algorithm itself, a 8 bit look-up table would be ideal, but means storing 256 strings. A reasonable speed vs size compromise is often to use a 4 bit nibble look-up instead. Example:

static const char* BINSTR_NIBBLE [16] = 
{
  [0x00] = "0000", [0x01] = "0001", [0x02] = "0010", [0x03] = "0011",
  [0x04] = "0100", [0x05] = "0101", [0x06] = "0110", [0x07] = "0111",
  [0x08] = "1000", [0x09] = "1001", [0x0A] = "1010", [0x0B] = "1011",
  [0x0C] = "1100", [0x0D] = "1101", [0x0E] = "1110", [0x0F] = "1111",
};

Nibbles might be a good choice if we want to print a space between them too, as is custom.

Type safety and icky signed types can be fixed with C standard _Generic and by casting to a type which is guaranteed not to be a small integer type (that risk getting implicitly promoted to signed).

Full example that solves all the mentioned problems:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

static const char* BINSTR_NIBBLE [16] = 
{
  [0x00] = "0000", [0x01] = "0001", [0x02] = "0010", [0x03] = "0011",
  [0x04] = "0100", [0x05] = "0101", [0x06] = "0110", [0x07] = "0111",
  [0x08] = "1000", [0x09] = "1001", [0x0A] = "1010", [0x0B] = "1011",
  [0x0C] = "1100", [0x0D] = "1101", [0x0E] = "1110", [0x0F] = "1111",
};

#define print_bin(i) _Generic((i),                                 \
    int8_t:   printf( "%s %s\n",                                   \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >>  4 & 0xFu],   \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >>  0 & 0xFu] ), \
    uint8_t:  printf( "%s %s\n",                                   \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >>  4 & 0xFu],   \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >>  0 & 0xFu] ), \
    int16_t:  printf( "%s %s %s %s\n",                             \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >> 12 & 0xFu],   \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >>  8 & 0xFu],   \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >>  4 & 0xFu],   \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >>  0 & 0xFu] ), \
    uint16_t: printf( "%s %s %s %s\n",                             \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >> 12 & 0xFu],   \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >>  8 & 0xFu],   \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >>  4 & 0xFu],   \
                      BINSTR_NIBBLE[(uint32_t)(i) >>  0 & 0xFu] ) )


int main (void)
{
  uint8_t u8 = 0xAB;
  int16_t i16 = -1;
  
  print_bin(u8);
  print_bin(i16);

  return 0;
}

Output

1010 1011
1111 1111 1111 1111

And so on - expanding to 32 or 64 bit type support should be trivial. This can get further optimized too, but it's already multiple times faster and safer than your original macros. gcc x86 disassembly of the above boils down to a bit of branch-free string shovelling (with string pooling to save memory):

.LC0:
        .string "1011"
.LC1:
        .string "1010"
.LC2:
        .string "%s %s\n"
.LC3:
        .string "1111"
.LC4:
        .string "%s %s %s %s\n"
main:
        sub     rsp, 8
        mov     edx, OFFSET FLAT:.LC0
        mov     esi, OFFSET FLAT:.LC1
        xor     eax, eax
        mov     edi, OFFSET FLAT:.LC2
        call    printf
        mov     r8d, OFFSET FLAT:.LC3
        mov     edi, OFFSET FLAT:.LC4
        xor     eax, eax
        mov     rcx, r8
        mov     rdx, r8
        mov     rsi, r8
        call    printf
        xor     eax, eax
        add     rsp, 8
        ret

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