0

Currently I've this approach in my app:

ViewState(one viewState to each screen)

sealed class CategoriesViewState {
    object Loading : CategoriesViewState()

    data class Error(
        val errorMessage: String,
        val messageType: UIComponentType
    ) : CategoriesViewState()

    data class CategoryList(
        val categories: List<Category>
    ) : CategoriesViewState()
}

And I observe this state in my fragments/activites using live data:

  viewModel.viewState.observe(viewLifecycleOwner, Observer {
            when (it) {
                is CategoriesViewState.Loading -> {
                progress_bar.visibility = View.VISIBLE

                    Log.d(TAG, "LOADING")
                }

                is CategoriesViewState.Error -> {
                progress_bar.visibility = View.GONE

                    Log.d(TAG, "ERROR")

                }

                is CategoriesViewState.CategoryList -> {
                progress_bar.visibility = View.GONE

                    Log.d(TAG, "DATA")

                }
            }
        })

And it is working fine.

BUT it seems to me inefficient as the app grows.

Let's say I've 20 screens in my app: I'll need 20 viewStates, I'll need to write the same when statement in every screen, I'll need to write this ugly Visible/Gone in every screen(not to mention I need to set Loading state in every call)

Maybe I'm totally wrong and it's common approach, But to me it seems like A LOT of code duplication.

I haven't a specific question, I Just wanna know if it is common approach in Android Development and if not, what am I doing wrong in my code?

1
  • Your question seems too broad to me, but I know the exact solution that you need. You need to create an abstract activity and fragment that all your other pages (Activity/Fragments) would eventually inherit. For your States on every page, I'll post answer to that. Sep 10 '20 at 7:24
5

Regarding your states for different activites, you don't need to make it every time you make new screen. You can follow approach like below and modify accordingly:

sealed class UIState<out T> where T : Any? {

    object Loading : UIState<Nothing>()

    data class Success<T>(val data: T) : UIState<T>()

    data class Failure(val errorMessage: String, val messageType: UIComponentType) : UIState<Nothing>()
}

So, now your CategoriesViewState can be represented as UiState<List<Category>>.

I'd also created some extension functions to make things easier on observe:

infix fun <T> UIState<T>.takeIfSuccess(onSuccess: UIState.Success<T>.() -> Unit): UIState<T> {
    return when (this) {
        is UIState.Success -> {
            onSuccess(this)
            this
        }
        else -> {
            this
        }
    }
}

infix fun <T> UIState<T>.takeIfError(onError: UIState.Failure.() -> Unit): UIState<T> {
    return when (this) {
        is UIState.Failure -> {
            onError(this)
            this
        }
        else -> {
            this
        }
    }
}

And during observe method of live data:

viewModel.viewState.observe(viewLifecycleOwner) { state ->
    state takeIfSuccess {
        // Here's the success state
    } takeIfError {
        // Here's the error state
    }
}
3
  • Awesome. Do you have some example project you use this?
    – pantos27
    Jan 20 at 14:36
  • @pantos27 Classes I shared above are generic, so you can put them in your project & then let's say you have to display list of items on one activity, your viewState would look like this: UIState<List<Products>> Jan 20 at 14:43
  • 1
    One thing to note here is I hate diamond braces while typing generics so I use type alias in kotlin, you can do the same. Jan 20 at 14:44

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