16

I built a script that works great with small data sets (<1 M rows) and performs very poorly with large datasets. I've heard of data table as being more performant than tibbles. I'm interested to know about other speed optimizations in addition to learn about data tables.

I'll share a couple of commands in the script for examples. In each of the examples, the datasets are 10 to 15 million rows and 10 to 15 columns.

  1. Getting the lowest date for a dataframe grouped by nine variables
      dataframe %>% 
      group_by(key_a, key_b, key_c,
               key_d, key_e, key_f,
               key_g, key_h, key_i) %>%
      summarize(min_date = min(date)) %>% 
      ungroup()
  1. Doing a left join on two dataframes to add an additional column
      merge(dataframe, 
          dataframe_two, 
          by = c("key_a", "key_b", "key_c",
               "key_d", "key_e", "key_f",
               "key_g", "key_h", "key_i"),
          all.x = T) %>% 
      as_tibble()
  1. Joining two dataframes on the closest date
      dataframe %>%
      left_join(dataframe_two, 
                  by = "key_a") %>%
      group_by(key_a, date.x) %>%
      summarise(key_z = key_z[which.min(abs(date.x - date.y))]) %>%
      arrange(date.x) %>%
      rename(day = date.x)

What best practices can I apply and, in particular, what can I do to make these types of functions optimized for large datasets?

--

This is an example dataset

set.seed(1010)
library("conflicted")
conflict_prefer("days", "lubridate")
bigint <- rep(
  sample(1238794320934:19082323109, 1*10^7)
)

key_a <-
  rep(c("green", "blue", "orange"), 1*10^7/2)

key_b <-
  rep(c("yellow", "purple", "red"), 1*10^7/2)

key_c <-
  rep(c("hazel", "pink", "lilac"), 1*10^7/2)

key_d <-
  rep(c("A", "B", "C"), 1*10^7/2)

key_e <-
  rep(c("D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I"), 1*10^7/5)

key_f <-
  rep(c("Z", "M", "Q", "T", "X", "B"), 1*10^7/5)

key_g <-
  rep(c("Z", "M", "Q", "T", "X", "B"), 1*10^7/5)

key_h <-
  rep(c("tree", "plant", "animal", "forest"), 1*10^7/3)

key_i <-
  rep(c("up", "up", "left", "left", "right", "right"), 1*10^7/5)

sequence <- 
  seq(ymd("2010-01-01"), ymd("2020-01-01"), by = "1 day")

date_sequence <-
  rep(sequence, 1*10^7/(length(sequence) - 1))

dataframe <-
  data.frame(
    bigint,
    date = date_sequence[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_a = key_a[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_b = key_b[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_c = key_c[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_d = key_d[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_e = key_e[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_f = key_f[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_g = key_g[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_h = key_h[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_i = key_i[1:(1*10^7)]
  )

dataframe_two <-
  dataframe %>%
      mutate(date_sequence = ymd(date_sequence) + days(1))

sequence_sixdays <-
  seq(ymd("2010-01-01"), ymd("2020-01-01"), by = "6 days")

date_sequence <-
  rep(sequence_sixdays, 3*10^6/(length(sequence_sixdays) - 1))

key_z <-
  sample(1:10000000, 3*10^6)

dataframe_three <-
  data.frame(
    key_a = sample(key_a, 3*10^6),
    date = date_sequence[1:(3*10^6)],
    key_z = key_z[1:(3*10^6)]
  )
8
  • 2
    data.table could be well suited to your needs. Could you supply a script to create fake data to test this with microbenchmark?
    – Waldi
    Commented Sep 7, 2020 at 9:24
  • 1
    Check out the tidyft::parse_fst where you read fst file.
    – akrun
    Commented Sep 7, 2020 at 22:27
  • 2
    Yes, but the difference seems to be not so big: iyarlin.github.io/2020/05/26/dtplyr_benchmarks As this link explains, you can do it even faster by imposing dataframe to be a data.table
    – iago
    Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 14:02
  • 3
    This list by Dirk Eddelbuettel has lots of tools for working with large datasets cran.r-project.org/web/views/HighPerformanceComputing.html
    – Cauder
    Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 14:18
  • 2
    You should including loading lubridate package in your example, it uses ymd function. Question in general could be improved to be fully reproducible, that would be useful for answers to provide working code.
    – jangorecki
    Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 15:41

3 Answers 3

11
+100

What best practices can I apply and, in particular, what can I do to make these types of functions optimized for large datasets?

use data.table package

library(data.table)
d1 = as.data.table(dataframe)
d2 = as.data.table(dataframe_two)

1

grouping by many columns is something that data.table is excellent at
see barchart at the very bottom of the second plot for comparison against dplyr spark and others for exactly this kind of grouping
https://h2oai.github.io/db-benchmark

by_cols = paste("key", c("a","b","c","d","e","f","g","h","i"), sep="_")
a1 = d1[, .(min_date = min(date_sequence)), by=by_cols]

note I changed date to date_sequence, I think you meant that as a column name

2

it is unclear on what fields you want to merge tables, dataframe_two does not have specified fields so the query is invalid
please clarify

3

data.table has very useful type of join called rolling join, which does exactly what you need

a3 = d2[d1, on=c("key_a","date_sequence"), roll="nearest"]
# Error in vecseq(f__, len__, if (allow.cartesian || notjoin || #!anyDuplicated(f__,  : 
#  Join results in more than 2^31 rows (internal vecseq reached #physical limit). Very likely misspecified join. Check for #duplicate key values in i each of which join to the same group in #x over and over again. If that's ok, try by=.EACHI to run j for #each group to avoid the large allocation. Otherwise, please search #for this error message in the FAQ, Wiki, Stack Overflow and #data.table issue tracker for advice.

It results an error. Error is in fact very useful. On your real data it may work perfectly fine, as the reason behind the error (cardinality of matching rows) may be related to process of generating sample data. It is very tricky to have good dummy data for joining. If you are getting the same error on your real data you may want to review design of that query as it attempts to make row explosion by doing many-to-many join. Even after already considering only single date_sequence identity (taking roll into account). I don't see this kind of question to be valid for that data (cadrinalities of join fields strictly speaking). You may want to introduce data quality checks layer in your workflow to ensure there are no duplicates on key_a and date_sequence combined.

7
  • 2
    This is a great article about how rolling joins work gormanalysis.com/blog/r-data-table-rolling-joins
    – Cauder
    Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 15:45
  • point 2 still needs clarification. Your merge call specify columns to join on that don't exist in both tables which is an invalid usage. If I would know on which columns you want to merge those tables I could try to provide ready-to-use code.
    – jangorecki
    Commented Sep 13, 2020 at 17:25
  • Can you also mention that values of setting keys in joins with data tables?
    – Cauder
    Commented Sep 13, 2020 at 17:36
  • Unfortunately I am trying to reproduce your code and getting dataframe_two <- + dataframe %>% + mutate(date_sequence = date_sequence + days(1)) ✖ Input date_sequence` can't be recycled to size 10000000. ℹ Input date_sequence is date_sequence + days(1). ℹ Input date_sequence must be size 10000000 or 1, not 10001914. Run rlang::last_error() to see where the error occurred.`
    – jangorecki
    Commented Sep 13, 2020 at 17:38
  • I'll use dput maybe that'll be easier. Can you please try again with library(conflicted) and conflict_prefer("days", "lubridate"). data tables and lubridate both have a function called days and can you wrap date_sequence with ymd(). I'll update the description
    – Cauder
    Commented Sep 13, 2020 at 17:38
5

Expanding on @jangorecki's answer.

Data:

library(lubridate)
library(dplyr)
library(conflicted)
library(data.table)

dataframe = data.frame(bigint,
    date_sequence = date_sequence[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_a = key_a[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_b = key_b[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_c = key_c[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_d = key_d[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_e = key_e[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_f = key_f[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_g = key_g[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_h = key_h[1:(1*10^7)],
    key_i = key_i[1:(1*10^7)])

dataframe_two = dataframe %>% mutate(date_sequence1 = ymd(date_sequence) + days(1))

dataframe_two$date_sequence = NULL

Benchmarks:

1.

dplyr result of 2 runs: 2.2639 secs; 2.2205 secs
st = Sys.time()
a1 = dataframe %>% 
  group_by(key_a, key_b, key_c,
           key_d, key_e, key_f,
           key_g, key_h, key_i) %>%
  summarize(min_date = min(date_sequence)) %>% ungroup()
Sys.time() - st
data.table results: 1.0987 secs; 0.9825 secs
setDT(dataframe)
by_cols = paste("key", c("a","b","c","d","e","f","g","h","i"), sep="_")
st = Sys.time()
a2 = dataframe[, .(min_date = min(date_sequence)), by=by_cols]
Sys.time() - st

2.

dplyr

setDF(dataframe)
st = Sys.time()
df3 = merge(dataframe, 
      dataframe_two, 
      by = c("key_a", "key_b", "key_c",
             "key_d", "key_e", "key_f",
             "key_g", "key_h", "key_i"),
      all.x = T) %>% as_tibble()
Sys.time() - st
# Error in merge.data.frame(dataframe, dataframe_two, by = c("key_a", "key_b",  : 
#  negative length vectors are not allowed

data.table

setDT(dataframe)
setDT(dataframe_two)
st = Sys.time()
df3 = merge(dataframe, 
            dataframe_two, 
            by = c("key_a", "key_b", "key_c",
                   "key_d", "key_e", "key_f",
                   "key_g", "key_h", "key_i"),
            all.x = T)
Sys.time() - st
# Error in vecseq(f__, len__, if (allow.cartesian || notjoin || !anyDuplicated(f__,  # : 
#  Join results in more than 2^31 rows (internal vecseq reached physical limit). 
# Very likely misspecified join. Check for duplicate key values in i each of which 
# join to the same group in x over and over again. If that's ok, try by=.EACHI to 
# run j for each group to avoid the large allocation. Otherwise, please search for 
# this error message in the FAQ, Wiki, Stack Overflow and data.table issue tracker 
# for advice.

This error is helpful and running the following:

uniqueN(dataframe_two, by = c("key_a", "key_b", "key_c",
                                    "key_d", "key_e", "key_f",
                                    "key_g", "key_h", "key_i"))

gives

12

When I am working with datasets containing about 10 million rows and 15 columns, I convert strings to factors before merging and have seen performance gains from approx. 30 secs to 10 secs for an inner join. To my surprise, setkey() was not as effective as converting strings to factors in that particular case.

EDIT: Reproducible example of data.table merge in 3 flavours (on character column, setkey, strings to factors)

Create tables:

x = 1e6
ids = x:(2*x-1)
chrs = rep(LETTERS[1:10], x)
quant_1 = sample(ids, x, replace = T)
quant_2 = sample(ids, x, replace = T)

ids_c = paste0(chrs, as.character(ids))

dt1 = data.table(unique(ids_c), quant_1)
dt2 = data.table(unique(ids_c), quant_2)

(i) on character column

system.time({result_chr = merge(dt1, dt2, by = 'V1')})
#   user  system elapsed 
#  10.66    5.18   18.64 

(ii) using setkey

system.time(setkey(dt1, V1))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   3.37    1.55    5.66 
system.time(setkey(dt2, V1))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   3.42    1.67    5.85  
system.time({result_setkey = merge(dt1, dt2, by = 'V1')})
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.17    0.00    0.16

(iii) strings to factors

dt3 = data.table(unique(ids_c), quant_1)
dt4 = data.table(unique(ids_c), quant_2)

system.time({dt3[, V1 := as.factor(V1)]})
#   user  system elapsed 
#   8.16    0.00    8.20 
system.time({dt4[, V1 := as.factor(V1)]})
#   user  system elapsed 
#   8.04    0.00    8.06 
system.time({result_fac = merge(dt3, dt4, by = 'V1')})
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.32    0.01    0.28 

In this case, setkey is overall the fastest with total 11.67 seconds. However, if data is ingested with strings to factors as true then no need to use setkey.

Example 2: In case your data comes in one file with rows separated by an attribute, for example date, and you need to separate them first, then do a join.

Data:

dt5 = data.table(date = '202009', id = unique(ids_c), quant = quant_1)
dt6 = data.table(date = '202010', id = unique(ids_c), quant = quant_2)
# Original data comes combined
dt = rbindlist(list(dt5, dt6))

(i) setkey

system.time(setkey(dt, id))
#  user  system elapsed 
#  5.78    3.39   10.78 
dt5 = dt[date == '202009']
dt6 = dt[date == '202010']
system.time({result_setkey = merge(dt5, dt6, by = 'id')})
# user  system elapsed 
# 0.17    0.00    0.17 

(ii) strings as factors

dt5 = data.table(date = '202009', id = unique(ids_c), quant = quant_1)
dt6 = data.table(date = '202010', id = unique(ids_c), quant = quant_2)
dt = rbindlist(list(dt5, dt6))
system.time({dt[, id := as.factor(id)]})
#   user  system elapsed 
#   8.17    0.00    8.20  
dt5 = dt[date == '202009']
dt6 = dt[date == '202010']
system.time({result_fac = merge(dt5, dt6, by = 'id')})
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.34    0.00    0.33 

In this case, strings to factors is faster at 8.53 seconds vs 10.95. However, when shuffling the keys before creating the tables ids_c = sample(ids_c, replace = F), setkey performs 2x faster.

Also, note that not every function in data.table is faster than combination of base functions. For example:

# data.table    
system.time(uniqueN(ids_c))
#   user  system elapsed 
#  10.63    4.21   16.88 

# base R
system.time(length(unique(ids_c)))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.78    0.08    0.94 

Important to note that uniqueN() consumes 4x less memory, so would be better to use if RAM size is a constraint. I've used profvis package for this flame graph (from a different run than above): flame graph

Finally, if working with datasets larger than RAM, have a look at disk.frame.

3

By default, R works with data in memory. When your data gets significantly larger R can throw out-of-memory errors, or depending on your setup use the pagefile (see here) but the pagefiles is slow as it involves reading and writing to disk.

1. batching

From just a computation perspective, you may find improvements by batching your processing. Your examples include summarising the dataset down, so presumably your summarised dataset is much smaller than your input (if not, it would be worth considering other approaches to producing the same final dataset). This means that you can batch by your grouping variables.

I often do this by taking modulo of a numeric index:

num_batches = 50
output = list()

for(i in 0:(num_batches-1)){
  subset = df %>% filter(numeric_key %% num_batches == i)

  this_summary = subset %>%
    group_by(numeric_key, other_keys) %>%
    summarise(result = min(col)

  output[[i]] = this_summary
}
final_output = bind_rows(output)

You can develop a similar approach for text-based keys.

2. reduce data size

Storing text requires more memory than storing numeric data. An easy option here is to replace strings with numeric codes, or store strings as factors. This will use less memory, and hence the computer has less information to read when grouping/joining.

Note that depending on your version of R, stringsAsFactors may default to TRUE or FALSE. So probably best to set it explicitly. (discussed here)

3. move to disk

Beyond some size it is worth having data on disk and letting R manage reading to and from disk. This is part of the idea behind several existing R packages including bigmemory, ff and ffbase, and a host of parallelisation packages.

Beyond just depending on R, you can push tasks to a database. While a database will never perform as quickly as in-memory data, they are designed for handling large quantities of data. PostgreSQL is free and open source (getting started guide here), and you can run this on the same machine as R - it does not have to be a dedicated server. R also has a package specifically for PostgreSQL (RPostgreSQL). There are also several other packages designed for working with databases including dbplyr, DBI, RODBC if you want other options for interacting with databases.

While there is some overhead setting up a database, dplyr and dbplyr will translate your R code into SQL for you, so you don't have to learn a new language. The downside is that you are limited to core dplyr commands as translations from R to SQL are only defined for the standard procedures.

6
  • Can I spin up the PostgreSQL db from within my R instance or terminal?
    – Cauder
    Commented Sep 10, 2020 at 21:32
  • R can pass commands to the cmd prompt, and (almost) anything you can do with a mouse & keyboard interactively you could do from the terminal. So if you're very determined then I am sure you'd find a way. But I don't have a way to do this, and the tutorials I've found online involve some setup outside of R. Note that once a database is setup on the computer, you can access it and load data into it from within R.
    – Simon.S.A.
    Commented Sep 11, 2020 at 2:02
  • 2
    For your point 2, R uses a global string pool so storing strings as factors shouldn't bring any additional benefit.
    – Alexlok
    Commented Sep 11, 2020 at 21:20
  • @Alexlok makes a good point if working within R. If reading/writing to disk or a database then this still is worth considering.
    – Simon.S.A.
    Commented Sep 12, 2020 at 7:55
  • Adding to @Alexlok factors are in general memory inefficient in R when compared to character vectors. One of the main points why stringAsFactors was changed to default to FALSE in ´R-4.0.0`.
    – Oliver
    Commented Sep 12, 2020 at 9:59

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