9

My ASP.NET MVC site connects to a WCF service to get data. The WCF service returns a data contract like this:

[DataContract]
public class Person
{
    [DataMember]
    public string First { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public string Last { get; set; }
}

The view model in my MVC project looks like this:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public string SomeExtraField1 { get; set; }
    public string SomeExtraField2 { get; set; }
    public string SomeExtraField3 { get; set; }

    public Person Person { set; set; }
}

Should my view model be referencing the "Person" data contract that is returned from the data service? Or should I create a new "Person" class in my MVC project that mirrors the properties on the "Person" data contract?

The WCF service call is hidden behind an interface. It seems to be that having the interface reference the data contract makes my interface a leaky abstraction. However, I have a few people that believe creating an additional "Person" class in my MVC project that mirrors the data contract is code bloat.

What are are the best practices surrounding this type of layering/decoupling?

17

Should my view model be referencing the "Person" data contract that is returned from the data service?

No, avoid this, it's giving developers the false impression that they are using view models. I quite often see code like this when doing code reviews:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public SomeDomainModel1 Model1 { get; set; }
    public SomeDomainModel2 Model2 { get; set; }
    ...
}

and that's just wrong. When I critique them for not using view models they show me this and tell me: "Darin, look, I am using view models", unfortunately that's not how view models are supposed to work. They are not wrappers around domain models.

Or should I create a new "Person" class in my MVC project that mirrors the properties on the "Person" data contract?

Yes, you could create a PersonViewModel and include only the properties that your view needs of course.

Or if the particular view you are designing this view model for needs only some properties you could also make it look like this:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public string SomeExtraField1 { get; set; }
    public string SomeExtraField2 { get; set; }
    public string SomeExtraField3 { get; set; }

    // this would be for example the concatenation of your domain model 
    // first name and last name as that's what this particular view needs to 
    // display
    public string PersonFullName { set; set; }
}

As far as the conversion between your domain models and view models is concerned, AutoMapper is simply put: excellent.

6
  • Is it ok to pass the domain object to the view model via the constructor and use he domain object privately? – Fixer Feb 18 '12 at 10:18
  • @Fixer, no, the default model binder will choke on that. – Darin Dimitrov Feb 18 '12 at 10:19
  • @Darin, +1 for introducing AutoMapper – Amir Rezvani Feb 21 '12 at 12:41
  • What if the domain models only have the stuff the views need, and nothing extra? What would be the disadvantage then? – kbmax Aug 18 '12 at 0:37
  • @kbmax, I haven't yet encountered such case. There are always some specific requirements for the views, be it for display, editing or validation purposes. But of course if you think that view models do not bring any additional benefit for your scenario feel absolutely free not to use them. – Darin Dimitrov Aug 18 '12 at 6:53
3

I'd say create a Mapper layer that would convert between the WCF Person class and the "mirror" Person class. That way you are tying your MVC implementation to a POCO and not directly to WCF. This adds the ability to swap out WCF with another service without touching MyViewModel in the future if need be (looser coupling).

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