1

I have a derived store like:

const filter = derived([a, b, c, d, e], callback, null);

function callback([$a, $b, $c, $d, $e], set) {
  ....
  set(...);
  return() = {
    ....
  };
};

Is there an easy way to find out which store of [a..e] triggers the callback in the callback besides caching store values. For instance: I like to reset with set(null) if store 'c' updates.

Example code using a closure to cache a store value:

function cache() {
  let cached;
  return ([$a, $b, $c, $d, $e], set) => {
    ....
    set(...);
    return() = {
      if (cached !== $c.value) {
        cached = $c.value;
        set(null);
      };
    };
  };
};

function filterStore() {
  const callback = cache();
  const { subscribe } = derived([a, b, c, d, e], callback, null);
  return {
    subscribe,
  };
};

const filter = filterStore();
0

I don't how you would do that purely with a derived store, but when I hear "tracing back what caused the mutation", my first thought is to look into actions (à la VueX/Mobx).

That means your derived store would effectively be a writable one, and you would write a service/action that updates all the stores accordingly : 

const initMySecondStore =  writable(0)

const mutateCandSecondStore = () => {
  c.set(value)
  mySecondStore.set(null)
}

const mutateAandSecondStore = () => {
 c.set(value)
 mySecondStore.update(updateMeDifferently)
}

And then calling the actions accordingly in your UI.

I wouldn't use a derived store for something that does not purely depend on the state of other stores.

5
  • I do not understand what you mean and I'am not familiair with VueX. My derived store acts as a filter. But when the session changes (which is also a store) I have to reset the filter. The idea is: add the session store (c) to the filter, catch the session update and reset the filter. – voscausa Sep 9 '20 at 15:48
  • And works fine. But to detect the c-store change I have to cache the last c-store value. My question: Maybe there is a easy and better way to detect which store changes in a derived store. – voscausa Sep 9 '20 at 15:54
  • I meant that rather trying to detect if $c changes, you should use a specific function to update both $c and your second store (previously "derived"). This you are sure about what triggered the change. Sorry if it was unclear. – Etienne Sep 10 '20 at 9:50
  • OK Etienne. I used a "specific function". But maybe it could be done within a derived store. A kind of auto reset on ... But I think there is no elagant solution, so I stick with the specific function. – voscausa Sep 10 '20 at 14:12
  • Yep, that's a workaround but not really a proper solution to your specific question. Although I think, in the end it is more mainatable (at least it closer to common patterns) – Etienne Sep 10 '20 at 14:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.