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I have an array of data I'm mapping over, and I want to style a card element one of three colors depending on a comparison of two items of each object in the array. The code looks something like this:

data.map(item => {
 return (
  //some code
  <Card className={
   item.someNumber > item.anotherNumber*1.05 ?
   classes.orange :
   item.someNumber < item.anotherNumber*.95 ?
   classes.blue :
   classes.grey}
   >
  //more code

This seems to work (i.e. all my cards are colored as expected), but my question is, is this "bad code"? I couldn't really find a definitive answer or a solution similar to this (possibly I wasn't asking the right questions); I did try creating functions with if/else statements above the code that gets rendered, but because of how we're mapping through the data and the fact that the color is based on comparisons within each object in the array, I couldn't figure out how to make anything else work.

4
  • 3
    You say. In my opinion, any ternary operator with more than two cases is bad for readability. – Prateek Thapa Sep 7 '20 at 14:15
  • 1
    Why don't you write a method which contains this logic (in a more readable way) and returns the right classname? – André Frings Sep 7 '20 at 14:16
  • @PrateekThapa I'm actually the only one reading this code, so if readability is the only potential issue, then I'm ok with it being the way it is. – Rachel Stevens Sep 8 '20 at 15:16
  • @AndréFrings one of the problems is that I'm returning multiple cards that contain different pieces of data from the array, so trying to write a method the way you suggest becomes tricky (I did try for several hours). – Rachel Stevens Sep 8 '20 at 15:16
1

In this case, I think it comes down to preference and readability. If you're the only one working on this project and you find a nested ternary easy to reason about, I think the code you posted is a concise way of expressing that logic.

Personally, I find nested ternaries difficult to read so, even if it takes a few more lines of code, I would find a different way to express that logic.

Here are a few alternative solutions you may want to consider:

  1. Moving selection logic outside the props
data.map(item => {
 let className = classes.grey;
 if (item.someNumber > item.anotherNumber*1.05) {
  className = classes.orange;
 } else if (item.someNumber < item.anotherNumber*.95) {
  className = classes.blue;
 }

 return (
  //some code
  <Card className={className}>
  //more code
})
  1. Moving selection logic to a function
const getClassName = item => {
 if (item.someNumber > item.anotherNumber*1.05) {
  return classes.orange;
 } else if (item.someNumber < item.anotherNumber*.95) {
  return classes.blue;
 } else {
  return classes.grey;
 }
};

data.map(item => {
 return (
  //some code
  <Card className={getClassName(item)}>
  //more code
})
  1. It seems to me like the 3 cases you have laid out may be mutually exclusive (i.e. it cannot be that both the first two conditions are simultaneously true), in which case you can use a helper library like classnames to perform this logic.
import cx from 'classnames';

data.map(item => {
 const className = {
  [classes.orange]: item.someNumber > item.anotherNumber*1.05,
  [classes.blue]: item.someNumber < item.anotherNumber*.95,
  [classes.grey]: item.someNumber >= item.anotherNumber*.95 && item.someNumber <= item.anotherNumber*1.05
 };

 return (
  //some code
  <Card className={cx(className)}>
  //more code
})

It's up to you to decide if any of these are "better" or more readable than what you currently have. If you're working with teammates, I would ask their opinion as well since you'll all be working to maintain the same code.

1
  • Thank you for all the suggestion! I am the only one working on this code, and, probably because I have a weird brain, I don't find the multiple conditions in the ternary operator difficult to read through. :) But I will look into the other options - mostly, I just wanted to make sure I wasn't writing code that would eventually break something. Thanks again! – Rachel Stevens Sep 8 '20 at 15:19
0

You could also create a function that contains your classNames logic and then call it in the element's className attribute. See example:

const classLogic = () => {
  if (someCondition == true) {
    return "class-1";
  } else {
    return "class-2";
  }
};

<Card className={classLogic()} ></Card>
1
  • This is actually what I initially tried, but I actually have 6 cards that each return different pieces of data and have different styling requirements (I know, annoying ;) ). But thank you for the suggestion! – Rachel Stevens Sep 8 '20 at 15:17
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I use this library for conditionally joining classNames together https://github.com/JedWatson/classnames. Using this you can get rid of boiler plate code(if you create another function that returns className) and you just have to focus on conditions and className.

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