1

Consider the following c++ program:

template<typename X>
struct S
{
    X x;
};

template<typename>
void f()
{
    S<void> s;
}

int main()
{
}

When compiled with "-std=c++17 -pedantic-errors" it gives a compilation error with clang, but gives no compilation errors with gcc.

What does the c++ standard say about this program? Is it valid or not? In case it is invalid, does it have undefined behaviour?

If the person that answers this could go ahead and include the relevant parts of the c++ standard in their answer that would be great.

Compiler explorer link to try this out: https://godbolt.org/z/Ke1K7b

1
  • f() is never instantiated. add f<int>(); to main. – Richard Critten Sep 7 '20 at 18:33
7

Your function template makes the program ill-formed, no diagnostic required.

[temp.res]

8 The validity of a template may be checked prior to any instantiation. [ Note: Knowing which names are type names allows the syntax of every template to be checked in this way. — end note ] The program is ill-formed, no diagnostic required, if:

  • no valid specialization can be generated for a template or a substatement of a constexpr if statement within a template and the template is not instantiated, or

Whatever you instantiate f with, it's gonna result in an invalid declaration. So it matches against that paragraph.

Clang checks immediately, GCC doesn't, but both approaches are equally valid. Either way, the problem is with the construct in the template, not with the compiler.

7
  • Thanks for the answer. One followup question: What if I replace S<void> s; with if constexpr (false) { S<void> s; } Still undefined behaviour in that case? – Supremum Sep 7 '20 at 18:43
  • 1
    @Supremum - Yes, I would say so. That if constexpr branch is just like a template that is never instantiated. It's still ill-formed ndr. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Sep 7 '20 at 18:48
  • 4
    @cigien - It doesn't matter that S<void> can be specialized as valid. That specialization still needs to be visible before f, because the type S<void> is not dependent. It isn't visible, so it's just an unconditionally invalid construct for us to plug into [temp.res]/8. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Sep 7 '20 at 19:02
  • 1
    Aah, right, that makes sense, S<void> needs to be dependent as well, not just the if constexpr condition. – cigien Sep 7 '20 at 19:06
  • 1
    @Supremum - [temp.res]/8 has many clauses, I suggest you enter the link and read them if you have any more scenarios in mind. Your latest one already featured in the question LanguageLawyer insisted about, the one that points at timsong-cpp.github.io/cppwp/n4861/temp.res#8.4 – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Sep 8 '20 at 7:52

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