7

I am new to docker and this is just a fascinating tool. However, I can't understand one thing about it. Simple Dockerfile usually begins with OS name and version, like:

FROM ubuntu:xenial
....

But which Linux OS will be used for Dockerfile like

FROM perl
....

or

FROM python:3.6
....

Of course I can find this out by running a container from this image and printing out the OS info, like:

docker run  -it  --rm  perl  bash
# cat /etc/*-release

or

docker run  -it  --rm  python:3.6  bash
# cat /etc/*-release

BTW, In both cases the OS is "Debian GNU/Linux 10 (buster)".

So, my questions are:

  1. How do I find out which OS will be run for a specific docker image without actually creating a docker container from it (the docker inspect command does not provide this info: docker inspect perl | grep -i Debian)

  2. How do I change the OS type for existing docker image. For example, I have an image that uses Ubuntu 14.04, and I want to change it to Ubuntu 18.04..

Thank you for your help:)

3 Answers 3

6

A docker image doesn't need an OS. There's a possibility of extending the scratch image which is purposely empty and the container may only contain one binary or some volume.

Having an entire OS is possible but also misleading: The host shares its kernel with the container. (This is not a virtual machine.)

That means that no matter what "OS" you are running, the same kernel in the container is found:

Both:

docker run --rm -it python:3.6 uname -a
docker run --rm -it python:3.6-alpine uname -a

will report the same kernel of your host machine.

So you have to look into different ways:

docker run --rm -it python:3.6 cat /etc/os-release

or

lsb_release -sirc

or for Cent OS:

cat /etc/issue

In stead of scratch, a lot of images are also alpine-based to avoid the size overhead. An ubuntu base image can easily have 500MB fingerprint whereas alpine uses around 5MB; so I rather check for that as well.

Also avoid the trap of manually installing everything onto one Ubuntu image inside one big Dockerfile. Docker works best if each service is its own container that you link together. (For that check out docker-compose.)

In the end, you as an user shouldn't care about the OS of an image, but rather its size. Only as a developer of the Dockerfile is it relevant to know the OS and that you'll find out either by looking into the Dockerfile the image was built (if it's on docker hub you can read it there).

You basically have to look what was used to create your image an use the appropriate tools for the job. (Debian-based images use apt-get, alpine uses apk, and Fedora uses yum.)

5
  • Thank you for the answer.. But if OS is not important, how do I know which installation tools (e.g. Ubuntu's "apt-get" or CentOS's "yum" etc) should be used in the Docker file that is based on the images like "perl" or "python" etc?
    – Ivan
    Sep 8, 2020 at 0:47
  • 1
    @Ivan If you are using the Dockerfile of different people, there shouldn't be much need to install anything else, you basically should only need the image. If you are building the Dockerfile, the OS is your choice. Can you elaborate why you want to move one image from 14.04 to 18.04?
    – k0pernikus
    Sep 8, 2020 at 0:58
  • Well, I am trying to create a Docker image for a web-app that is based on the Perl's Catalyst framework (+mysql db). I found this catalyst docker image on the github that is based on the Ubuntu 14.04 hub.docker.com/r/rsrchboy/perl-catalyst-latest On the other hand the production server that runs the Catalyst app uses Ubuntu 18.04. So, I just wanted to make the docker image as close as possible to the production server to make sure everything will be working in the same way :)
    – Ivan
    Sep 8, 2020 at 1:02
  • 1
    That image you want to use is both outdates and it had parents and the parent has a parent. You could try copying all three Dockerfiles together in order to have it hold based in ubuntu:bionic.
    – k0pernikus
    Sep 8, 2020 at 1:14
  • Yep, that what I was going to do) Thank you for the help, man)
    – Ivan
    Sep 8, 2020 at 1:23
1

How do I find out which OS will be run for a specific docker image without actually creating a docker container from it

The only way to determine what os is being used is as you have described: spawn a container and print the os information. There is no metadata that says "this image was build using <x>".

In many (but not all) situations, this information may not be especially important.

How do I change the OS type for existing docker image. For example, I have an image that uses Ubuntu 14.04, and I want to change it to Ubuntu 18.04..

If you have access to the Dockerfile used to build the image, you can of course change the base image (the image named in the FROM line) and build a new one, but you may find that this requires a number of other changes due to different software versions in your updated image.

1

You can use "docker cp" to extract the "/etc/os-release" file without starting the container:

$ docker pull ubuntu:latest
Status: Image is up to date for ubuntu:latest

$ docker create ubuntu:latest
2e5da8bf02312870acd0436e0cc4eb28fbcc998f766cd9639c37101f65739553

$ docker cp -L 2e5da8bf02312870acd0436e0cc4eb28fbcc998f766cd9639c37101f65739553:/etc/os-release .

$ docker rm 2e5da8bf02312870acd0436e0cc4eb28fbcc998f766cd9639c37101f65739553

$ cat ./os-release
NAME="Ubuntu"
VERSION="20.04.2 LTS (Focal Fossa)"
ID=ubuntu
ID_LIKE=debian
PRETTY_NAME="Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS"
VERSION_ID="20.04"
HOME_URL="https://www.ubuntu.com/"
SUPPORT_URL="https://help.ubuntu.com/"
BUG_REPORT_URL="https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/"
PRIVACY_POLICY_URL="https://www.ubuntu.com/legal/terms-and-policies/privacy-policy"
VERSION_CODENAME=focal
UBUNTU_CODENAME=focal

Note: I had to use "docker cp -L" because /etc/os-release is a symlink on ubuntu:latest.

Honestly, I find this to be a lot of trouble just to avoid starting the container, and it requires the "/etc/os-release" file to be present. If you're willing to (very) briefly run the container, I find this more convenient, and a little more robust. Note: it's very important to specify --entrypoint="", otherwise the container will start invoking its normal startup routine!

$ docker run --rm -i -a STDOUT --entrypoint="" \
    ubuntu:latest  sh -c 'head -n 1000 /etc/hostname /etc/*[Rr][Ee][Ll]*'

==> /etc/hostname <==
b243ff33e245

==> /etc/lsb-release <==
DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu
DISTRIB_RELEASE=20.04
DISTRIB_CODENAME=focal
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS"

==> /etc/os-release <==
NAME="Ubuntu"
VERSION="20.04.2 LTS (Focal Fossa)"
ID=ubuntu
ID_LIKE=debian
PRETTY_NAME="Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS"
VERSION_ID="20.04"
HOME_URL="https://www.ubuntu.com/"
SUPPORT_URL="https://help.ubuntu.com/"
BUG_REPORT_URL="https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/"
PRIVACY_POLICY_URL="https://www.ubuntu.com/legal/terms-and-policies/privacy-policy"
VERSION_CODENAME=focal
UBUNTU_CODENAME=focal

Here's the same command against "alpine:latest":

docker run --rm -i -a STDOUT --entrypoint="" \
    alpine:latest  'sh' '-c' 'head -n 1000 /etc/hostname /etc/*[Rr][Ee][Ll]*'

==> /etc/hostname <==
a8521c768aeb

==> /etc/alpine-release <==
3.13.4

==> /etc/os-release <==
NAME="Alpine Linux"
ID=alpine
VERSION_ID=3.13.4
PRETTY_NAME="Alpine Linux v3.13"
HOME_URL="https://alpinelinux.org/"
BUG_REPORT_URL="https://bugs.alpinelinux.org/"

Note: I add "/etc/hostname" to the list of files to "head" to make sure it finds 2 or more files, to ensure "head" to uses its "==> file <==" output style. Whereas if it only runs against a single file it doesn't print the filename.

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