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Is there a way to get GNAT to ensure all exception cases are handled?

To give an example:

   package IO renames Ada.Text_IO;
   package EIO renames Ada.IO_Exceptions;

   procedure Open_File (File : in out IO.File_Type) is
   begin
      IO.Open (File, IO.In_File, "example.txt");
   exception
      when EIO.Use_Error =>
         IO.Put_Line ("Use!");
      when EIO.Device_Error =>
         IO.Put_Line ("Device!");
   end Open_File;

Open can also raise Name_Error so I would like GNAT to warn that case has not been handled.

I found pragma Restrictions (No_Exception_Propagation) but that seems to apply the check to the standard library calls as well so Open becomes unusable because it propagates exceptions itself. If I apply this to my example, I get:

14:07: warning: pragma Restrictions (No_Exception_Propagation) in effect
14:07: warning: this handler can never be entered, and has been removed
16:07: warning: pragma Restrictions (No_Exception_Propagation) in effect
16:07: warning: this handler can never be entered, and has been removed

For an example of what I want from another language; Nim has a raises pragma to annotate what exceptions a procedure can raise, which the compiler enforces. The list can be empty, ie. raises: [], and the compiler will require that all exceptions will be handled and not propagate. Is there an equivalent to this in Ada?

  • 1
    Using SPARK, you can guarantee all exceptions are handled in SPARK-verified sections of your program, by proving that none will ever be raised... – Brian Drummond Sep 9 at 12:06
4

That is not possible in Ada.

Nim is able to do it because the raises pragma is part of the function signature. Therefore, for any call, it is statically known which exceptions can be raised. This is not the case in Ada.

If you argue that the compiler could implicitly figure out which exceptions can be raised by any subroutine, that is true but does not solve the problem because Ada allows for both dispatching calls and function pointers. For both of these you don't know statically the function which will be called (without a pointer analysis anyway, which is out of scope for most compilers) and therefore can't know the exceptions that could be raised (since they are not part of the signature).

| improve this answer | |
  • It isn’t really true that the compiler can figure out which exceptions could be raised. One of the contributors on c.l.a. points out that it’s always possible for Storage_Error to be raised (f.e. by stack overflow, which I doubt even SPARK can prevent) – Simon Wright Sep 10 at 11:14
  • @SimonWright That would just mean that the compiler tells you that Storage_Error can be raised on any operation that allocates (just like Constraint_Error could be raised by any division operation). This was more of a theoretical remark; the modular compilation model of Ada forbids propagation of such body-derived knowledge anyway since a compilation unit knows only the specification of other units. There are languages (e.g. Zig) that do treat Storage_Error as an error that is inferred and part of the signature. – flyx Sep 10 at 11:30
  • Doesn’t have to be allocation, at least not from the heap: if you declare a string of length Integer’Last, it would be pleasing to get Storage_Error rather than a very obscure memory tramplement. Something like this happened to me because I thought that Unchecked_Conversion merely provided an alternate view of an object rather than creating a copy on the stack (this behaviour might be affected by the optimisation level) – Simon Wright Sep 10 at 14:46
4

If you want to handle all available exceptions, you can use when others in exception section. Your example will look that:

package IO renames Ada.Text_IO;
package EIO renames Ada.IO_Exceptions;

procedure Open_File (File : in out IO.File_Type) is
begin
   IO.Open (File, IO.In_File, "example.txt");
exception
   when An_Exception : others =>
      IO.Put_Line (EIO.Exception_Message(An_Exception));
end Open_File;

If you want to handle each exception in a separated way, then you have to list each of exceptions separately (as in your example). But compiler will not warn you about missing handler of an exception.

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