27

I'm new to React and I'm learning about the React component lifecycle with the latest version of React. My "super" call of the partial code below is flagged with the deprecated warning shown. I've had trouble understanding this one, as a lot of documentation out there still uses "super", and I'm not sure what the successor is, even from the full article linked in the feedback. Any ideas? Thanks.

class App extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
  }
}

Here is the warning:

constructor React.Component<any, any, any>(props: any, context?: any): React:Component<any, any, any> (+1 overload)
@deprecated
@see - https://reactjs.org/docs/legacy-context.html
'(props: any, context?: any): Component<any, any, any>' is deprecated ts(6385)
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6

It looks like the optional context parameter is deprecated because it refers to the legacy React context (pre v16.3). What version of React are you using?

https://reactjs.org/docs/legacy-context.html

I have not used React with TypeScript. Maybe React mappings are out of date.

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  • 1
    I'm using React 16.13.1. The thing that confuses me, is that I'm not even using that optional parameter. – Steven Sep 12 at 5:11
  • 1
    What would the successor to constructor(props, context) be? – Steven Sep 12 at 5:12
  • 2
    Looks like I can just call super() instead of super(props). I got the idea from here: stackoverflow.com/questions/30571875/… – Steven Sep 12 at 5:42
  • That should be fine unless you need to use this.props inside the constructor. The successor is defined outside the component. reactjs.org/docs/context.html – Dmitry S. Sep 14 at 12:53
11

You need super(props); only if you gonna use this.props in the constructor. Otherwise you can use super(); If you use super(); in the constructor it is not a problem that outside of the constructor you will call this.props. You can read about it in the following link: https://overreacted.io/why-do-we-write-super-props/

class Button extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(); //we forgot to pass props
    console.log(props); //{}
    console.log(this.props); //undefined
  }
  // ...
}

It can be even more challenging if this happens in some method that's called from the constructor. And that's why I recommend always passing down super(props), even through it isn't necessary.

class Button extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props); //we passed props
    console.log(props); //{}
    console.log(this.props); //{}
  }
  // ...
}
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4

I think this is a bug in jslint. The code obviously isn't using the context parameter.

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